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Best eyepiece for Lunt 60

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#1 bulletdodger

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 08:00 AM

This is not specific to an actual eyepiece but more about the magnification and FOV that best suits being able to view the Sun in it's entirety with as much magnification as possible.
For example my 7mm Axiom LX with an 82° was obviously too much to view the entire disk. Hopefully there is a magic number for the 60mm keeping in mind I have the B600 BF not the B1200.

Thanks for any info!

Bob

#2 spacemunkee

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 08:42 AM

Have same scope with B600. I like using the Baader IV zoom with it. Allows me to get full disk view and a good zoom in on proms.

#3 Eddgie

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 08:50 AM

I too recommend a good zoom eyepiece. The Hyperion Matt recommends or the Lunt zoom are both great choices.  While at 60mm, seeing is not as frequently limited by seeing as with larger scopes, but often the view will be better at lower power than at higher power, and the zoom makes it easy to go between the two.

 

I use a pair of inexpensive zooms on the sun (I binoview) and get fantastic results.

 

Also this.. For looking at the faintest prominences, I think it is actually beneficial to have a lot of the sun's disk out of the field because without the added brightness in the field, the really faint extensions seem easier to see.  But that is me and a personal preference. If you want to see the full disk, I recommend the Hyperion zoom as well. 

 

I think your concern though is that the apparent field seems small for the eyepiece, and that is a function of the BF600.  At the focal plane of the BF600, the solar disk is only 4.6mm across, and the rear openening in the BF600 is only 6mm across.  This only fully illuminates about a 5mm image circle, and outside of this, the illumination falls off until you get to the hard vignetting caused by the rear aperture of the BF600.  This means that while you should have even been able to get the full disk in your 7mm Axiom (and I was kind of curious as to why you could not) it would have been a tight fit because while the Axiom has a 10mm fields stop, it was peering into a hole only 6mm across. 


Edited by Eddgie, 02 January 2020 - 08:53 AM.


#4 MalVeauX

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 09:12 AM

Heya,

 

I generally use my Lunt 7-21 zoom for viewing. I like zooms to be able to quickly look at something at higher magnification as I find things and back out to wide FOV to scan around. Otherwise, I binoview with a pair of longer focal length plossls (32mm to 20mm) and just choose a power and scan around.

 

Very best,


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#5 PhotonJohn

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 02:42 PM

I also have a Lunt 7-21 zoom on my Lunt 60 mm. This eyepiece also works well for lunar and planetary observing.



#6 sunnyday

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 02:43 PM

read my signature 



#7 bulletdodger

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 08:48 AM

Thanks to all of you for your knowledge and experience. Together you folks make a great advertising campaign for the Lunt 7-21 zoom. While I understand any zoom will work I am going to purchase the Lunt based upon your collective agreement.
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#8 descott12

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 10:02 AM

Thanks to all of you for your knowledge and experience. Together you folks make a great advertising campaign for the Lunt 7-21 zoom. While I understand any zoom will work I am going to purchase the Lunt based upon your collective agreement.

Yep, I have the Lunt zoom and it is great quality and good bang for the buck.


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#9 Mariner@sg

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 10:47 AM

This is not specific to an actual eyepiece but more about the magnification and FOV that best suits being able to view the Sun in it's entirety with as much magnification as possible.
For example my 7mm Axiom LX with an 82° was obviously too much to view the entire disk. Hopefully there is a magic number for the 60mm keeping in mind I have the B600 BF not the B1200.

Thanks for any info!

Bob

Bob. I jave the 60 as well as the B600 configuration. I use a 7XW to view the full disc nicely in the FOV. I'm curious why the Axiom 7mm 82° did not work for you.



#10 Don W

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 12:14 PM

I have a high quality Vixen zoom. Sometimes I'll use that to determine what magnification gives a good image that day and switch it out with a fixed eyepiece like a Plossl.



#11 bigdob24

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 01:08 PM

I have a high quality Vixen zoom. Sometimes I'll use that to determine what magnification gives a good image that day and switch it out with a fixed eyepiece like a Plossl.

Don

Ive been kicking around a zoom eyepiece but it sounds like your opinion would be a fixed Plossl provides a better image than a “quality zoom”

I all most always use a set of Binos and was looking at a zoom for mono.  
‘Should I reconsider?

Just courious

BD 



#12 Highburymark

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Posted 04 January 2020 - 01:06 PM

I’ve used many eyepieces for solar ha viewing, and the best remain the Pentax XF 6.5-19.5mm zoom and TeleVue 11/15/20/25mm Plossls, followed by Leica ASPH zoom, various orthos, and TV Delites. The Lunt zoom isn’t a long way behind the XF, but the XF delivers slightly sharper and brighter views. And here in the UK at least, it can be picked up for only about $30-40 more than the Lunt - though the Lunt is really overpriced here.

#13 Eddgie

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 09:58 AM

Don

Ive been kicking around a zoom eyepiece but it sounds like your opinion would be a fixed Plossl provides a better image than a “quality zoom”

I all most always use a set of Binos and was looking at a zoom for mono.  
‘Should I reconsider?

Just courious

BD 

I use binoviewers and even with cheap zooms, I find the views far better than I can get with a single focal length eyepiece of any quality.

 

Binoviewing is to me like "stack and a half" viewing.  Surface features show up far better when I use both eyes.   Easily better than the best fixed focal lenght eyepieces I use.

 

Now some might laugh at the $40 apiece zooms I use, but they compare well to my Nikon zooms, with the major difference being that the apparent field is far smaller in the inexpensive zooms, though even with the very small apparent field at the 21mm setting, I can still fit the entire solar disk into the field.  Otherwise, in terms of the amount of detail I can see, I find very little difference between the cheap zooms and the Nikons.  I prefer the cheap zooms because the tops don't rotate when zooming making the use of winged eye guards possible. 

 

I like the zooms because it makes it easy to ramp power up and down to match the ever changing seeing conditions.   I can go from 21mm setting (I am working at 1.5x with my GPC so the power is 1.5x what the 21 would give without it) to the 9mm (about the most I feel comforatble with using the BVs due to dimming) in about 10 seconds.   

 

Just about every session, I will go back and forth between powers many times as I use the low power to find interesting details then zoom in for close study, or when I have moments where I can see the limb has gone dead steady and I can immediately go back to some prom to study it structure at high mags.

 

I started using binoviewers with zoom on the sun about seven years ago, and every now and then, I think maybe I am missing something and try a single eyepiece, and that lasts only a few seconds before I go back to my cheap binoviewers and cheap zooms.

 

For solar white light using my wedge and 106mm Apo, the cheap zooms allow me to see amazing structure in side the umbra of sunspots and recently I saw my first light bridge of the new cycle using BVs with my cheap zooms, so I don't feel like I am sacrificing anything.

Binocular summation is powerful stuff.  If you are one of those people that can go to the eye doctor and read the same small line with one eye as you can with both eyes, then maybe BVs are not necessary for you to get the most detail, but for anyone that can see that small line more cleary when they open both eyes than they can using either the right or the left eye, how could they think that monoviewing at the telescope would be better than using both eyes at the telescope???

 

At the doctors office, I see 20/25 with my left eye and 20/20 with my right eye, but when I use both eyes, I can read the 20/15 line.  It is exactly the same thing for me at the telescope. Why would I penalize myself by denying the use of one eye?   The question for you is if you get the same outcome at the doctors office (reading a smaller line or reading a line more easily with both eyes) why would you want to go from your binoviewers to using one eye?   


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#14 Peterroth108

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Posted 11 January 2020 - 10:53 PM

I have a Lunt 60 tilt tuned and I use binoviewers with 20mm plossl eyepieces. Binoviewing is so much better than one eyed. Image contrast is greatly increased, and using two eyes creates a 3-d effect. The view is better than double stacking which I don’t like because it dims the image too much. Prior to using binoviewers I liked using a 17mm Plossl. Always seemed to give the best magnification under most conditions. Even during solar minimum when there is not a lot of dramatic action on the solar surface the binoviewers make the image pop because the amazing texture of the surface is always there.
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