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Best eyeglasses lenses for stargazing (& night driving).

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#1 25585

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 10:30 AM

Time for new night use eyeglasses, #1 purpose stargazing. So I'm particuarly looking for special lens material types with no astigmatism and field curvature.

 

My optician does these https://www.zeiss.co...afe-lenses.html but I am uncertain if they are that much better than standard high quality.

 

Does anyone have any recommendations for types, brands, makes etc. #2 purpose is night driving.


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#2 sg6

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 11:14 AM

I ended up with Zeiss glass in my glasses, waste of time. They seem to get dirty quicker. I was sort of "conned" into it at the time.

 

I said the basic glass, so they put in the basic Zeiss glass. I was happy with BK7, but they cost less. Complained to the optician chain - never went anywhere.

 

These days they are almost certainly going to be plastic. I had glass but opticians steer away from it now, plastic is I suppose easier and cheaper. When I asked for glass I was told "Not sure our glaziers can handle that", my reply was "Then they are not glaziers then are they?"

 

Mine are best described as close to useless for the sky. Eventually worked out why.

 

They will measure your eyes and determine the new lens required, usually for infinity.

Then they add in an amount for "close" use - TV, PC screens etc.

But that close use detracts from the initial which is/was for infinity - or a few lightyears distance.

 

The idiot on mine added in far too much, so detail of far stuff is lost. You do notbwant to know what M45 looks like to me at this time.

 

The added thing is termed "Reading Addition".

A previous precription added in 1.5, the last one added in 2.5 and 2.5 is way too much.

So if you want the sky that Reading Addition needs to be low or lowish.

The 2.5 they threw in for mine means I cannot clearly read a number plate at more the 75 feet - that is where it becomes hard work. Utterly stupid bunch. And to add insult to injury to read I do not wear my glasses as for close work I don't need them. So I read a book without glasses at the eyes rest point and all is comfortable. I use this laptop without glasses also. So what reading addiition?

 

Guess the fun at my next eye test. Which will have to be soon also.

 

You may want to think of something that passed through my mind: Get a good test and presecription for what you want, get an inexpensive set made, or expensive, then via the internet visit the Glasses Direct site and purchase a set or two from them.

 

Idea is that if the prescription is good then 2 sets from them can be used for the night sky. That way you have extra sets. My thought being splatting plastic lens on to eyepiece rubber has to damage them eventually. So a couple of almost "throw away" sets makes possible sense. But you need to get the prescription right first, and that means something on your nose to look through.


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#3 hallelujah

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 11:21 AM

https://www.costco.com/optical.html


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#4 hoof

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 11:43 AM

I’m in the middle of a multi year project to slowly walk my myopic eyes back to 20/20 (astronomical), and thus am going through about 24 sets of glasses.

I used to get the $400 high end ones, but that is prohibitive when I’m stepping down every 3-4 months. I’d rather spend that money on eyepieces! :). Now I get cheap Zenni’s with the simplest polycarb glasses with AR coatings, about $15/pair. And they seem to be as good as my older expensive types. Better yet, polycarb lenses have the best chromatic abberation due to their low refractive index (leads to thicker lenses).

Still, if your prescription is simple, it’s easy to get high quality glasses for little money. That said, I haven’t prices the cost of adding cylinder for astigmatism, so I don’t know how much that would be. The other issue is you don’t have a person involved in helping to pick the pescription.
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#5 rockethead26

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 11:46 AM

If you go to a real ophthalmologist and not a chain store, you can get the doctor to spend time with you, learn what you want and take the proper measurements for the glasses that function the way that you want them to. There is no reason to allow an optician to decide what will work for you. Finding a good ophthalmologist is worth the effort. 


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#6 garret

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 12:09 PM

Rodenstock:  https://www.rodensto...ye-scanner.html

Zeiss: https://www.zeiss.co...technology.html

 

Both do eye measurements when eyepupil is large.

Both incorporate how the frame fit on your face in the final prescription.

Both cost you an arm and a leg.

 

No matter what you do choose always glass, my own el cheapo glasses are made from plastic and are tinted... absorbing about 20% of the light and they scratch also very easily.  


Edited by garret, 02 January 2020 - 12:19 PM.

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#7 hallelujah

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 12:14 PM

If you go to a real ophthalmologist and not a chain store, you can get the doctor to spend time with you,

learn what you want and take the proper measurements for the glasses that function the way that you

want them to.

Finding a good ophthalmologist is worth the effort. 

At Costco the Doctor of Optometry has a separate office.

He does the exam & you can shop where ever you like.

Either way, the prices are reasonable & the products are high quality.

 

https://clark.com/he...buy-eyeglasses/

 

Stan


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#8 BFaucett

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 01:13 PM



At Costco the Doctor of Optometry has a separate office.

He does the exam & you can shop where ever you like.

Either way, the prices are reasonable & the products are high quality.

 

https://clark.com/he...buy-eyeglasses/

 

Stan

 

There is a difference between an optometrist and an ophthalmologist. I go to an an ophthalmologist.

 

https://www.healthli...ophthalmologist

 

Cheers! Bob F. smile.gif


Edited by BFaucett, 02 January 2020 - 01:18 PM.

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#9 StevenYood

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 02:17 PM

I got the Nikon lenses because the properly corrected area was larger on them than on the mainline or the Zeiss lenses.  You are absolutely correct that the stock prescription for everyday lenses is useless under the stars.  Myopia is worse with a fully dialated pupil, so one needs an extra -0.5 to -1.0 diopter to compensate.  My ophthalmologist was willing to check me dark adapted to get the right prescription.  I did not get progressive lenses for my Astro Glasses so that I would get the full field of view when looking up.  I have to carry a magnifying glass in my pocket, anyhow, to read my charts and lists.  The indignities of aging never end, do they?!


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#10 SteveG

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 02:32 PM

I use Zeiss HD high index lenses in my progressives ( last 2 prescriptions). I recently bought them again as they were the best I’ve ever had. I use my standard prescription and see nice, pinpoint stars. The worst lenses I ever had were polycarbonate. Just driving down the road I saw rainbows on everything. YMMV.


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#11 dustyc

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 02:43 PM

I have progressives, and the last 2 sets have used a plastic lens from a brand named Varilux. 

 



#12 Paul G

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 03:12 PM

One of the US Astro magazines had an article describing what changes were needed for eyeglass prescriptions for best correction for stargazing. Anyone have a link?



#13 25585

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 07:24 PM

I have progressives, and the last 2 sets have used a plastic lens from a brand named Varilux. 

Those are my standard, I have the HD Essilor that gives good coverage like SteveG's Zeiss.

 

Plastic lenses at least don't fog up so much in the cold. 



#14 Napp

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 09:06 PM

One of the US Astro magazines had an article describing what changes were needed for eyeglass prescriptions for best correction for stargazing. Anyone have a link?

Here’s the link.  https://s22380.pcdn..../spectacles.pdf

 

I took the article to my optician.  She was very cooperative and made a pair of single vision glasses for me.  I normally wear bifocals.  I do some meteor observing and wanted my entire field of vision to be for distant vision.  I was very happy with them.  Not only did I see more pinpoint stars but I definitely saw fainter stars.  I have lately noticed a slight degradation of the view through these glasses.  Obviously, my vision has slightly changed so I am getting new glasses for nighttime use only.


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#15 25585

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 07:21 AM

Here’s the link.  https://s22380.pcdn..../spectacles.pdf

 

I took the article to my optician.  She was very cooperative and made a pair of single vision glasses for me.  I normally wear bifocals.  I do some meteor observing and wanted my entire field of vision to be for distant vision.  I was very happy with them.  Not only did I see more pinpoint stars but I definitely saw fainter stars.  I have lately noticed a slight degradation of the view through these glasses.  Obviously, my vision has slightly changed so I am getting new glasses for nighttime use only.

I am taking this to my optician, see what they can do, to keep my custom. 



#16 Keith NC

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 09:27 AM

To address the night driving part of the question get a top line anti-reflective coating like Crizal.  Also provides a high level of scratch protection 


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#17 carlsonmjc

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Posted 06 January 2020 - 11:24 AM

I agree with Hoof. Check out Zenni optical website.  Inexpensive and a wide range ( with descriptions ) of optical types to chose from.

 

 

 

Mark C 


Edited by carlsonmjc, 06 January 2020 - 11:25 AM.


#18 CrazyPanda

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Posted 06 January 2020 - 02:45 PM

Time for new night use eyeglasses, #1 purpose stargazing. So I'm particuarly looking for special lens material types with no astigmatism and field curvature.

 

My optician does these https://www.zeiss.co...afe-lenses.html but I am uncertain if they are that much better than standard high quality.

 

Does anyone have any recommendations for types, brands, makes etc. #2 purpose is night driving.

I got the Zeiss iScription lenses. Best decision I've ever made. Razor, razor, razor sharp. They map aberrations in your eye and build custom lenses around them accurate to 1/100th of a diopter. It took my eye/brain about 2 days to full acclimate to how much more detail I could see. I've now had them for about 6 months and I *still* cannot get over how much detail I can see with them now. My old prescriptions were regularly maintained and were as accurate as possible, but these iScription lenses made them look like the prescription was way off.

 

Night driving went from being painful to painless because light from headlights stayed where it belongs. It's not quite perfect, but it's MUCH better than my old standard prescription lenses and contacts.

 

Naked eye viewing shows extremely pinpoint stars and by my estimate, added a little over half a magnitude to what I could see.

 

Unfortunately, I had to compromise with these glasses and I got built-in blue light filtering so they filter out a tiny bit of blue light since I work with computers all day. This hurts their astronomical performance a bit. I've thought about getting a pair dedicated PURELY for astronomy with no blue light filtering and much more aggressive anti-reflection coatings, but they're expensive so that will have to wait.


Edited by CrazyPanda, 06 January 2020 - 02:47 PM.

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#19 25585

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Posted 06 January 2020 - 09:44 PM

My optician may do iScription as a Zeiss partner. Picking up the new varifocals tomorrow so will enquire...  



#20 izar187

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Posted 09 January 2020 - 08:07 PM

Glass glasses for this hobby are definitely a worthwhile investment.

Sharper stars, fainter limit of detection, better night vision around the observing site, far easier to keep crystal clean in the field in the dark, for years longer than polycarb. IMO+E.

Arguably every bit as important as the next iteration of multi-hundred dollar whizz-bang mega field eyepiece.

 

Keep 'em just for the night sky.

Wear something else for regular everyday use.


Edited by izar187, 09 January 2020 - 08:10 PM.

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#21 ascii

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Posted 09 January 2020 - 10:20 PM

I have myopia and presbyopia.  My daily wear glasses are polycarbonate progressives - about the worst you can have for astronomy.  Polycarbonate has poor dispersion, and progressives suffer from off-axis astigmatism.

 

I got a spare pair of glasses that are lined bifocals with traditional plastic (CR-39) lenses.  I'm not sure which of the two differences improves the view most or if both do, but they are noticeably better than my progressives for astronomy.  

 

CR-39 is supposed to have very similar optical characteristics to glass.  It is also more scratch resistant than polycarbonate.

 

https://en.m.wikiped...Corrective_lens


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#22 Sarkikos

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Posted 11 January 2020 - 11:58 AM

I have myopia, presbyopia and astigmatism.  So whatever eyepieces I have for astronomy better be progressive or at least bifocal.  Single focus eyepieces are out of the question.  I'm not switching between far-distance and near-distance pairs of glasses, or using a magnifying glass. 

 

I need to see the night sky clearly without the telescope and also be able to see charts clearly in SkySafari Pro.  I star hop.  I go back and forth quickly and often among sky view, telescope view, finder view, and SkySafari Pro view.  Switching among eyeglasses or a magnifying glass isn't going to cut it. 

 

Mike


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#23 REC

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Posted 11 January 2020 - 02:02 PM

Would you consider contact lenses? My Doc made me a set of Toric lenses that correct for any astigmatism and are set for focus at infinity. Now I can look up at the stars and then go directly to the eyepiece without have to remove my glasses.



#24 REC

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Posted 11 January 2020 - 02:04 PM

I got the Zeiss iScription lenses. Best decision I've ever made. Razor, razor, razor sharp. They map aberrations in your eye and build custom lenses around them accurate to 1/100th of a diopter. It took my eye/brain about 2 days to full acclimate to how much more detail I could see. I've now had them for about 6 months and I *still* cannot get over how much detail I can see with them now. My old prescriptions were regularly maintained and were as accurate as possible, but these iScription lenses made them look like the prescription was way off.

 

Night driving went from being painful to painless because light from headlights stayed where it belongs. It's not quite perfect, but it's MUCH better than my old standard prescription lenses and contacts.

 

Naked eye viewing shows extremely pinpoint stars and by my estimate, added a little over half a magnitude to what I could see.

 

Unfortunately, I had to compromise with these glasses and I got built-in blue light filtering so they filter out a tiny bit of blue light since I work with computers all day. This hurts their astronomical performance a bit. I've thought about getting a pair dedicated PURELY for astronomy with no blue light filtering and much more aggressive anti-reflection coatings, but they're expensive so that will have to wait.

Sounds expensive, how much where they, if you don't mind asking?



#25 25585

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Posted 11 January 2020 - 02:18 PM

Would you consider contact lenses? My Doc made me a set of Toric lenses that correct for any astigmatism and are set for focus at infinity. Now I can look up at the stars and then go directly to the eyepiece without have to remove my glasses.

Tried contacts but couldn't get comfortable. So I decided to concentrate on what works with & for my eyes+glasses rather than trying to accomodate kit that is not suitable. 




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