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3 more doubles + 2 triples in Cassiopeia

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#1 flt158

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Posted 07 January 2020 - 01:24 PM

Goodness me, folks! We have only had 6 days so far in 2020, but I have managed to have 3 reasonably good observing nighttime sessions with my William Optics 158 mm apochromatic refractor which is supported by a Berlebach Planet altazimuth mount. I also use a 70 mm F/6 small apochromatic refractor which I have as my finder scope. Mirror diagonals are both fitted on both scopes. That means my north & and south are not inverted; but my east & west are

 

All my figures can be checked on www.stelledoppie.it

 

Each of these celestial objects are near Alpha Cassiopeiae (Schedar) and Delta Cassiopeiae (Ruchbah).

 

1. ES 2 is a faint but true binary discovered by the Reverend Thomas Espin. The magnitudes are 9 and 9.5. Sep = 5.9". PA = 113 degrees. It is my first time to see it. My scope split it well at 112X.

2. Sti 1364 is an optical double discovered by a Roman Catholic priest called Johann Stein. It is seriously faint with magnitudes 9.8 and 11. Sep = 14.7". PA = 9 degrees. I observed the split at 40X and 112X.

3. STT 33 is a very fine optical triple star near Delta Cassiopeiae (Ruchbah). The magnitudes are 7.3, 9 and 10.3. Sep's = 26.9" & 107". PA's = 77 and 109 degrees. The colours are blue (B9), almond brown (K7) and white. It looked truly charming at 40X and 112X. That B companion is my 2nd K7 star of the night.

4. ES 1712 is an optical double star. The magnitudes are 7.9 and 9.3. Sep = 47.2". PA = 2 degrees. I had a successful split at 40X. But 112X did it justice too.

5. HJL 1088 is a true binary. But the C star is optical. The primary is blue, but the other 2 are white. Sep's = 19.5" and 107.2". PA's = 168 and 218 degrees. Very nice and wide at 40X. They resemble a wide "V".

 

I had no success whatsoever with Stt 9 or J 872. It was quite a windy night with an 11.5 day old Moon shining brightly in the southern sky. 

 

Thank you for reading.
Comments are well received at all times.

 

Clear skies from Aubrey.


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#2 aa6ww

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Posted 07 January 2020 - 02:51 PM

I'm using stelledoppie for all my double star information lately. The more I use it, the easier and more valuable it becomes.

Are you star hopping to these doubles or using DCS or GoTo to find them? If using GoTo, are you entering in the coordinates manually?

I'm just curious since I don't have charts to identify these objects but I have GoTo and can enter in the coordinates.

 

...Ralph


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#3 flt158

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Posted 07 January 2020 - 04:29 PM

Hello, Ralph. 

I have been a great admirer of many of your posts here on Cloudy Nights. 

Recently in 2019 I received a 2nd copy of Guide 9.1 DVD. 

It is so handy to use, and I can print off maps for the positions of literally any celestial object in the entire sky -all except comets. 

I am based in Dublin, Ireland; and that is important to set as my location on the Guide 9.1 menu. 

So yes - I am starhopping. 

 

Thank you, Ralph. 

 

By the way, is that what you look like in real life?

Or is that an actor?

Just wondering. 

 

Kindest regards from Aubrey.  



#4 aa6ww

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Posted 07 January 2020 - 06:07 PM

My back yard skies are too bright for serious star hopping, so since late last years I started using my GoTo mount to help locate double stars.

 

My photo isn't me. This is Guy Williams, who was Dr. John Robinson on the Original Lost in Space series. He was an Astrophysicist so I like to think I am one in here also.

 

In this photo however, he was Will Cartwright, nephew of Ben Cartwright from the Bonanza TV Shows.

 

...Ralph


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#5 flt158

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 06:43 PM

O yeah - Guy Williams!

He's the guy from Lost in Space. 

Sadly he died in 1989. 

Thank you, Ralph. 

 

I'm sorry you have suffer from the dreaded light pollution. 

GoTo is common sense for you alright. 

 

Kind regards from Aubrey. 



#6 rugby

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 10:05 PM

Aubrey:what were the temps of your observing nights and how much time were the sessions. I. am averaging about one hour each good night with temps hovering between 1 and -1. I dont have push or goto. Sometimes  I only find two or three pairs. Star hopping with a moon present  and a city all around has some special challenges



#7 flt158

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Posted 09 January 2020 - 10:04 AM

Thank you very much for your interest, Rugby. 

It is very common practice for me to set up my William Optics apochromatic refractor before sunset occurs. 

At present, that roughly happens at 16.30 UT local time. 

By 17h I will have observed my first celestial object.   

I'll keep observing until 19h. (it's time for dinner.)  

Then at 20h, I will reappear and keep going until my 2020 diary page is full.

Generally my observing session might end by 22h. 

But for this recent night I ended by observing WW Cassiopeiae at 23h. 

So that's over 5.5 hours all in. 

Lots of extra clothes layers are required for that 2nd evening session.  

My nighttime temperatures have not yet plunged down 0 degrees Celsius. 

3 to 5 degrees seems to be the norm right now. 

Of course wind chill, and alternatively, dew are both problems to contend with from time to time. 

 

Please continue to take your time observing a minimal number of double stars, Rugby. 

I never go racing through seeing how many I can fit in!!

 

By the way, can any of you double star enthusiasts check out the colours of Stf 16 in Cassiopeia?

I did observe again on this recent night (6th January 2020) and I am still of the opinion that the secondary is a noticeable decent orange. (Not carbon star orange, mind). 

Perhaps I'm talking through my hat!

I will not mind anyone disagreeing with me. 

All learning is progress.  

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 


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#8 REC

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Posted 10 January 2020 - 04:35 PM

Goodness me, folks! We have only had 6 days so far in 2020, but I have managed to have 3 reasonably good observing nighttime sessions with my William Optics 158 mm apochromatic refractor which is supported by a Berlebach Planet altazimuth mount. I also use a 70 mm F/6 small apochromatic refractor which I have as my finder scope. Mirror diagonals are both fitted on both scopes. That means my north & and south are not inverted; but my east & west are

 

All my figures can be checked on www.stelledoppie.it

 

Each of these celestial objects are near Alpha Cassiopeiae (Schedar) and Delta Cassiopeiae (Ruchbah).

 

1. ES 2 is a faint but true binary discovered by the Reverend Thomas Espin. The magnitudes are 9 and 9.5. Sep = 5.9". PA = 113 degrees. It is my first time to see it. My scope split it well at 112X.

2. Sti 1364 is an optical double discovered by a Roman Catholic priest called Johann Stein. It is seriously faint with magnitudes 9.8 and 11. Sep = 14.7". PA = 9 degrees. I observed the split at 40X and 112X.

3. STT 33 is a very fine optical triple star near Delta Cassiopeiae (Ruchbah). The magnitudes are 7.3, 9 and 10.3. Sep's = 26.9" & 107". PA's = 77 and 109 degrees. The colours are blue (B9), almond brown (K7) and white. It looked truly charming at 40X and 112X. That B companion is my 2nd K7 star of the night.

4. ES 1712 is an optical double star. The magnitudes are 7.9 and 9.3. Sep = 47.2". PA = 2 degrees. I had a successful split at 40X. But 112X did it justice too.

5. HJL 1088 is a true binary. But the C star is optical. The primary is blue, but the other 2 are white. Sep's = 19.5" and 107.2". PA's = 168 and 218 degrees. Very nice and wide at 40X. They resemble a wide "V".

 

I had no success whatsoever with Stt 9 or J 872. It was quite a windy night with an 11.5 day old Moon shining brightly in the southern sky. 

 

Thank you for reading.
Comments are well received at all times.

 

Clear skies from Aubrey.

Sounds good, lot's of goodies in Cassiopeiae!


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#9 c2m2t

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Posted 11 January 2020 - 03:26 PM

Hi Aubrey!

Excellent report! I am always checking these posts for systems I have imaged. ES 2 I have. While checking out the remainder of your list, I discovered 2 that had not made it to my hit list and 2 that are just beyond where I left off. I did discover one typo and that is HJL 1088. After checking with SD I realized that you meant HJ 1088. HJL 1088 resides in Bootes and it is a bit of a surprise. Component mags are 7.76 & 8.02 with a separation of a whopping 304.9" and a PA of 25 degrees. Oddly enough, this pair is physical.

 

Keep submitting those great reports.

 

Cheers, Chris.

 

P.S. You seem to be getting many more favourable viewing sessions in Ireland than what we are getting here in Eastern Ontario!! frown.gif

Attached Thumbnails

  • ES 2-ns-6424-Label-sm.JPG

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#10 flt158

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Posted 11 January 2020 - 05:35 PM

Dang it! You're right, Chris. 

I should have written HJ 1088. 

I cannot seem to do an edit right now. 

 

Can one of our moderators correct this mistake please?

Thank you. 

 

That certainly is an excellent image of ES 2, Chris. 

I'm so glad you and I have both observed it.   

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 




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