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The Elger Intensity Scale for moon sketching?

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#1 AdirondackAstro

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 07:48 PM

Hey everyone. So I was doing some searching online for some tips and tricks for moon sketching since it is still new to me. I came across an article called The Art of Drawing the Moon (https://britastro.org/node/9529) where the elger instensity scale is mentioned, and my first time ever hearing about it. I've been wanting to setup a cheat sheet with examples of the scale 0-10 visually so I can use that, instead of constantly referring to a moon atlas for the scale. I was curious if anyone else has setup this scale, or uses this scale. If you have already setup a cheat sheet and happen to have it scanned I would appreciate that. Wondering if everyone else does like I have done with my few moon sketches so far and just do all the shading at the eyepiece? The thing that is motivating me to make this scale is so that I can do the most time consuming part--shading and shadows--inside now that it is quite cold outside. I really like the idea of sketching the outline at the eyepiece while labeling each section with the scale number so you know the shading needed for the drawing once you're back inside in a nice warm house. 

 


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#2 frank5817

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 11:10 PM

Mike,

 

The British Astronomical Association: Lunar Section and American Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers

both encourage sketching the Moon at the eyepiece of your telescope. There are a multitude of ways to approach this.

It is likely that most sketchers start with graphite or charcoal pencils on white paper or you can start with light and dark pastel pencils or crayons on black paper. There are many other choices including ink, electronic sketch pads and on and on. 

Anyone can sketch. When you do and continue sketching you will develop your own style and preferences as to media and approach. The most important thing is to try a lot of methods and materials until you find one or more that you like.

Then practice, practice, practice. You can practice outside looking at the Moon (naked eye, through a telescope, etc.). You can practice indoors looking at images of the Moon.

The Elger scale is just to help you separate  The darkest black from the brightest white into 11 increments 0-10. There is no magic there, but I think many folks can do it in fewer. Some may want more.

Look at the top entries in the Sketching forum: Click on the one called: Thread of interest in Sketching, including our contest. You will now see an entry titled: Collection of Sketching Forum's 'How To' Threads

Go to "Lunar Sketching Tutorials (Archived)" Start by looking at these 3

Step -by -step  Lunar sketching Graphite on white paper by  Carol Lakomiak or click here

Charcoal Sketching Tutorial by Erika Rix  ( Crater sketch) or click here

White on Black Paper Lunar Sketching Technique by Rich Handy. Linked to Lunar Observing Forum or click here

This should give you a good start.


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#3 Aquarellia

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Posted 10 January 2020 - 01:04 AM

I'm of course Ok with all the Frank's links and mentions.

However for me the key is observing, make a division by 11 of the moon values of light, is for me too "cart├ęsien" (a french concept coming from Descartes), you will loose the spontaneity of a good observation, and... the artistic counterpart.

So observe, observe, observe and sketch is my approach, I spend 3 more times at the eyepiece than the time sketching on the paper.  Our eyes are the best material!

But this is only my own method.

You will see a lot of different sketching methods in this forum, all valuable and in line with the observers personality's, it's why this forum is so rich!

 

Michel


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#4 frank5817

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Posted 10 January 2020 - 11:07 AM

Michel,

 

That is excellent advice you give here. 

You are a true artist based on all the beautiful works you do. I am much more mechanical in my drawing.

 

Frank :)


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#5 AdirondackAstro

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Posted 10 January 2020 - 12:27 PM

Thank you Frank and Michel. I have been doing the full drawings at the scope and do really like doing it that way. I mainly wanted to try this other method for those rare clear nights that also happen to be -10F or lower when it's too cold to spend a long time at the eyepiece in one sitting. I do agree that it is best to do it all at the eyepiece which allows for better accuracy. I'll probably scrap this idea and just keep doing it the way I have been. I had never heard of this method until I came across this site, so I was really curious if anyone else did it this way. Thank you both! And thanks for the links, Frank.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

Edited by AdirondackAstro, 10 January 2020 - 12:28 PM.



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