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Quantum absurdities and the crisis in physics

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#26 Mister T

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 03:49 PM

Holley 4-barrel

whoom-bah!

(which is exactly what the big bang sounded like)



#27 StrStrck

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 03:50 PM

As Sean Carroll elegantly puts it (paraphrase): Quantum Physics is to the classical physics scientist like a smart phone to most ordinary people: We know how, and when to use it. But if we split it open and look inside, we are unable to explain the exact inner workings of it.



#28 llanitedave

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 04:42 PM

What size carburetor bolts up to the ST manifold??

It's a quark injector.



#29 EJN

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 05:01 PM

whoom-bah!

(which is exactly what the big bang sounded like)


I've often wondered which speakers are the best for listening to the Big Bang, maybe Klipsch?

#30 MikiSJ

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 06:04 PM

...the absurdity we call the Big Bang.

I do not understand the math, but the thought that something began somewhere is easy to understand but difficult to explain.

 

I think cosmologists have the same problem. Plank Time is quantifiable. The need for 'inflation' isn't, except to fill a void in the understanding of how nothing becomes something and at a rate that exceeds understandable physics (the speed of light) - and then it simply fills in a lack of knowledge with a thought that many (most) cosmologists agree upon as a likely candidate for the what...

 

 ...if you think you understand quantum physics, you don’t understand it at all!

Richard Feynman

Quantum Mechanics fills a void in the knowledge of the real tiny. It is mainly a group of guesses that are explained by a set of mathematics that few understand and fewer still can explain. Can we really explain how an electron tunnels through a transistor and can function as a switch.

 

But physics and quantum physics have a workable set of rules that for the most part allow us to get along in life - at least until the rules are proven wrong. Newtonian gravity get us to the moon and back. Relativistic gravity gets the GPS system to work. But, we still do not know enough about gravity to consolidate with the other forces (electromagnetism, the strong and the weak nuclear forces).

 

I am reminded that when the Higgs Boson was announced at CERN, it was "I think we have it". Maybe they do, or maybe it allows for further research based upon a group of assumptions that may or not hold up over time.

 

There are still a lot of PhD theses being written trying to dispel this or that theorem,



#31 llanitedave

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 06:57 PM

I do not understand the math, but the thought that something began somewhere is easy to understand but difficult to explain.

 

I think cosmologists have the same problem. Plank Time is quantifiable. The need for 'inflation' isn't, except to fill a void in the understanding of how nothing becomes something and at a rate that exceeds understandable physics (the speed of light) - and then it simply fills in a lack of knowledge with a thought that many (most) cosmologists agree upon as a likely candidate for the what...

Quantum Mechanics fills a void in the knowledge of the real tiny. It is mainly a group of guesses that are explained by a set of mathematics that few understand and fewer still can explain. Can we really explain how an electron tunnels through a transistor and can function as a switch.

 

But physics and quantum physics have a workable set of rules that for the most part allow us to get along in life - at least until the rules are proven wrong. Newtonian gravity get us to the moon and back. Relativistic gravity gets the GPS system to work. But, we still do not know enough about gravity to consolidate with the other forces (electromagnetism, the strong and the weak nuclear forces).

 

I am reminded that when the Higgs Boson was announced at CERN, it was "I think we have it". Maybe they do, or maybe it allows for further research based upon a group of assumptions that may or not hold up over time.

 

There are still a lot of PhD theses being written trying to dispel this or that theorem,

If we stop fixating on "nothing", a lot of this angst goes away.



#32 Jim_V

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 08:55 PM

What is nothing? The lack of something? 



#33 bcgilbert

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 08:22 PM

     Who thinks the laser is a Quantum device???

 

Puzzled,

Barry



#34 Jim_V

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 10:33 PM

Not me



#35 bcgilbert

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 11:52 AM

What was Einstein's biggest blunder?

 

Cheers,

Barry



#36 EJN

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 03:11 PM

What was Einstein's biggest blunder?

Cheers,
Barry


Picking the Chicago Cubs to win the 1935 World Series.
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#37 StrStrck

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 04:22 PM

What was Einstein's biggest blunder?

 

Cheers,

Barry

Writing off Bohr’s QM initially (he later came around).



#38 bcgilbert

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 10:40 PM

        In my opinion, It was not accepting Plank's argument, that  Quantization only occurred in matter, and not in the field. 

      "All these fifty years of conscious brooding have brought me no nearer to the answer to the question, 'What are light quanta?' Nowadays every Tom, Dick and Harry thinks he knows it, but he is mistaken. (Albert Einstein, 1954)".

 

   Of course I'm talking about  "The Photon".

 

Albert, was to some extent justified, in his insistence that the field be quantized.

   (a)     Albert believed Maxwellian fields  drop off 1/r ,

   (b)     Albert  assumed that Maxwellian sources were isotropic,  and that "needle radiation"              would be required to satisfy his energy conservation concerns, and that "needle                       radiation does not exist".

 

   It may come as a surprise, to Quantum physicists, that Maxwell's equations and their application, is a work in progress, and extraordinarily successful.  The laser(needle radiation), amongst many other radio frequency antennae designs, demonstrate Albert was wrong  about 1/r drop off and "needle radiation".  The other phenomena he failed to consider was "zero point radiation" or what some wags refer to as "quantum noise" .

 

The end result is you do not need either, magic or photons, to translate Planck units of energy over huge distances.

 

Cheers, 

Barry.

 

PS. Neils  Bohr told C. H. Townes ( the inventor of the laser), it could not possibly work, due to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle.



#39 MikiSJ

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 01:05 AM

If we stop fixating on "nothing", a lot of this angst goes away.

I agree and if we accept that what 'inflation' explains is really the start of the universe and not what happened at a specific time, then it is easier to explain something about nothing.



#40 ColoHank

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 04:10 PM

What is nothing? The lack of something? 

"Nothing" may be the presence of something we can't detect or even imagine.  Imagine that!


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#41 bcgilbert

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 09:08 PM

Writing off Bohr’s QM initially (he later came around).

I was unaware of Einstein "coming around", could you please give me some detail, I'm obviously misinformed.

 

Cheers 

Barry




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