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Supernova in Andromeda

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18 replies to this topic

#1 Araguaia

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 05:09 AM

No, there isn't one, but...

 

If there was and it "outshone the rest of the stars in its galaxy", then it would shine at mag 3, and be clearly visible to the naked eye, right?  Quite a spectacle!

 

All the talk about SNs in Betelgeuse and M100 had me thinking before coffee, you see...


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#2 happylimpet

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 05:13 AM

There was one in 1885, and reached 5.85. reported as very red, so maybe it was obscured and mag 3 is attainable.


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#3 BradFran

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 06:02 AM

Ohhh... you click baited me. I couldn't click quick enough. lol.gif


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#4 Araguaia

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 07:25 AM

Sorry about the click bait... should have called it "If there were a supernova in Andromeda".  

 

Like I said, it was before coffee... 


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#5 jayrome

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 10:12 AM

This is the astronomer's Rickroll :p


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#6 happylimpet

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 10:49 AM

Yeah my heart skipped a beat when I saw the title too!



#7 FloridaFocus

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 12:32 PM

Ha, 235 views since the original post and only 5 replies, so I'm guessing a lot of people were excited.

 

Not sure of your occupation, or if you're retired, but if you're ever contemplating switching your field, you have a future as an internet headline writer, my friend!


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#8 birger

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 02:27 PM

Astronomers say that there are roughly two supernovae per century in the Milky Way galaxy. I can kinda understand why we can't see them, but wouldn't that mean that supernovae in the Andromeda Galaxy are much more frequent? It has about twice the amount of stars, so once every 25 years would be a reasonable guess. Still they seem rare. We also see the galaxy from the outside, so it is less likely that they are obscured by interstellar dust.

 

So why don't they come more often?


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#9 Araguaia

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 05:13 AM

Andromeda has a low rate of star formation - think of its faint and undefined arms.  That would mean less giant stars being formed to explode a few million years later.

 

Our galaxy appears to be medium-active.  

 

M33, on the other hand, has lots of bright star forming regions, so it should have frequent supernovas that also reach mag 3 or so - but then it is a lot smaller than the Milky Way, less stars.

 

Still, statistically, we should all see a SN in either the Milky Way, M31, or M33 within a normal lifetime... except... we haven't (so far).


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#10 Araguaia

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 08:05 AM

Well, from the number of views, looks like I did post some unintentional pre-coffee clickbait... but I can't edit the title...

 

On other forums, if you hover the cursor over the thread title, it shows you the first couple of lines of the post.  That way you get a "clickbait warning".  You can also edit thread titles, which is very useful.  I am afraid CN is a bit antiquated...

 

Anyway, I hope I got a bunch of you to visualize a magnitude 3 star appearing in Andromeda, and dream of seeing it without warning when you go out on a clear night...



#11 Astrojensen

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 04:46 PM

Maybe there's also amateur astronomers in the Andromeda galaxy, who complain that they haven't seen a supernova in ages. laugh.gif

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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#12 Jim4321

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 05:04 PM

Honestly, it was seeing the 2013-14 supernova  in M82 thru my old C8 on a cheap manual alt-az mount that fully re-hooked me on astronomy.  That tiny bright spark in that gray smudge is still burned into my memory.  It's my go-to answer when folks at outreach ask some variation of the 'what's the most memorable thing you've seen thru a telescope?' question.  

 

So a SN in Andromeda would probably be another lifetime event.

 

Jim H.


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#13 hiMike

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 06:31 PM

Maybe there's also amateur astronomers in the Andromeda galaxy, who complain that they haven't seen a supernova in ages. laugh.gif

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

Every time I look at Andromeda, I can't help but wonder if something is looking back... of course my light won't be there for a couple million years



#14 Chirp1

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 06:47 PM

Some times I click on my laser when I'm looking at Andromeda to see if someone flashes back. Not yet.
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#15 DarkAntimatter

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 09:17 PM

Maybe there's also amateur astronomers in the Andromeda galaxy, who complain that they haven't seen a supernova in ages. laugh.gif

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

That got me thinking.  Using the highly sophisticated method of eyeballing Sky Safari zoomed out, it looks like M31 is not too far from the Milky Way, so maybe our galaxy is closer to edge-on from M31, so some of our dust will be in the way for observers there hoping to see a supernova in our galaxy?  Whereas we see fairly well into M31 and really well into M33.

 

On the other hand, M31 is around 2.5M ly away, so they've got some time to prepare for the M1-creating supernova.


Edited by DarkAntimatter, 17 January 2020 - 09:22 PM.


#16 tchandler

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 09:02 AM

I’d be quite happy to witness a garden variety nova. The most recent bright nova (mag. 3 or brighter) visible from northern latitudes was Nova Cygni in 1975 (mag. 1.7), which came and went. I read about it after the fact in Astronomy magazine. I let loose a “D’oh!” long before Homer Simpson ever did!

 

But I get the appeal of supernova.... our blood has in it the ash of exploded stars....



#17 stevew

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 03:41 PM

I saw the Supernova in M81 back in 1993..


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#18 Rutilus

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 03:38 PM

Honestly, it was seeing the 2013-14 supernova  in M82 thru my old C8 on a cheap manual alt-az mount that fully re-hooked me on astronomy.  That tiny bright spark in that gray smudge is still burned into my memory.  It's my go-to answer when folks at outreach ask some variation of the 'what's the most memorable thing you've seen thru a telescope?' question.  

 

So a SN in Andromeda would probably be another lifetime event.

 

Jim H.

Yes, that was a really nice Supernova.


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#19 Rutilus

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 04:01 PM

I saw the Supernova in M81 back in 1993..

That was my first ever Supernova. I remember observing it in a small scope and drawing the field of view.

Back then (no internet) I sent the drawing to the head of the Deep sky section of the Society that I was a member of

(still am), I was convinced that I had missed the Supernova, due to it fading. However I was very pleased a couple

of days later, when the chap wrote back to me (remember those days of letter writing) saying that one of the dots

on my drawing was indeed the S/N. 




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