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Whats your Planet Killer telescope for 2020?

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#351 dUbeni

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 11:17 AM

Hi! my planet killer just got injured. Well! it's more of bb gun than a killer, it hurts a bit when close enough. It is my Vixen ED80S /f9.

67 getting ready For another night under The stars

it gives me wonderful views with good seeing on planets, at least until it got injured.

Now it troughs more scatter, and I'm trying a band-aid on it, but seeing is not cooperating.

97 Vixen ED80S blocking chipped lens

 

CS

Bernardo


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#352 Astrojensen

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 11:19 AM

I was kind of shocked to read so many posts in the refractor forum (many from bona fide refractor enthusiasts​) advocating the use of their large aperture dobs/newts/SCTs for the purpose of 'planet killing'. 

This should not come as a surprise. The true refractor enthusiast knows both the strengths, as well as the limitations of his telescopes and use them accordingly. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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#353 Scott99

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Posted 29 July 2020 - 01:36 PM

With great hesitation, I post a picture of the rig here in the refractor forum! scared.gif

ah, you may not be aware of this - the Teeter STS series is an officially endorsed and permitted Newtonian alternative by the apo mafia illuminanti - no worries! lol.gif


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#354 grif 678

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 01:49 PM

My 127 celestron Mak with WO binoviewers has given me outstanding planetary detail.


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#355 FeynmanFan

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 04:33 PM

My 100mm ED.  Not only is it paid for (fiscal problem solved), but it is a good fit for my general old-age decrepitude (physical problem solved).  It rides on a giro II mount which I find very capable.  If I can scrape the funds together (not so easily done in our current situation), I would love to add a binoviewer.  Downside to that would be the requirement to find additional eyepieces matching what I already have, or buying new pairs.  For planetary I mainly use well-traveled UO volcano top orthos, which aren’t sexy by today’s standards, but work well.  Does anyone have any suggestions for a mid-range binoviewer that can be fitted to an Orion ED100 without extensive modifications or plumbing?


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#356 Winks

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 01:14 PM

"Does anyone have any suggestions for a mid-range binoviewer that can be fitted to an Orion ED100 without extensive modifications or plumbing?"

 

Orion Linear Binoviewer



#357 clusterbuster

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 01:33 AM

That's going to be my 8" f/16 with binoviewers......This year and many to come smile.gif

Now, that's a REFRACTOR !!!

 Mark



#358 clusterbuster

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 01:36 AM

My Meade 10 SCT   OR

 My Orion 10 f/5.6 Dob.

 Mark


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#359 gnowellsct

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 06:56 AM

With great hesitation, I post a picture of the rig here in the refractor forum! scared.gif


Look at all the refractive glass in them thar Naglers. They are at least first cousins to the refractor telescope. So in a sense every forum is a refractor forum.

#360 ASTERON

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 08:44 AM

Here is my Planet Killer

Attached Thumbnails

  • DeathStar2.jpg

Edited by ASTERON, 06 August 2020 - 08:44 AM.

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#361 fate187

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 11:08 AM

nah ... large parabola ain't no planet killer for 2020 cuz it ain't no refractor :p:P


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#362 John Huntley

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 07:02 PM

So-- on these manual alt-az mounts (T-Rex/Discman/Rowan) can you move the scope without using the slow-motion controls? I'm assuming yes.

 

I'm in the market for a lightweight alt-az situation with slow-motion controls, but I'd rather have something scalable than have to keep trading up.

I've used the Rowan AZ100 and I currently own a T-Rex and, yes, the mounts can be moved smoothly without touching the slow motion controls.

 

As this thread is about scopes for observing the planets, here are two of mine:

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  • takvixeq01.JPG

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#363 fate187

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 12:15 AM

Usually I am not a fan of advocating other sites, but let me make an exception please:

https://ap-ug.groups...n/message/80832

AP 10" F/14.5 Mak. I just think its looks sublime. I just wish I could look through such a scope. Unfortunately, it is discontinued. Interesting story around those scopes from Roland on the scope optical design/manufacturing process for those interested. 

And sorry, this is not frac, but has a front glass wink.gif


Edited by fate187, 07 August 2020 - 12:16 AM.

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#364 GaryJCarter

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 01:34 AM

My planet killer for 2020:

 

image.jpeg

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#365 mikeDnight

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 03:14 AM

I'm not sure I'd call my 100mm refractor a planet killer, but it's certainly a planet thriller. The three sketches of Mars showing the Solis Lacus region from two nights ago shows how nice such small scopes can be, and what thrilling views they can give, even under less than perfect conditions. The sketches are as seen through a prism diagonal so are north top, e/w reversed. 

 

1595252029814_IMG_7067.jpg

 

IMG_7289.jpg


Edited by mikeDnight, 09 August 2020 - 03:14 AM.

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#366 Astrojensen

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 03:38 AM

Mike, your planetary sketches never ceases to amaze me. 

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark


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#367 Jethro7

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 03:58 AM

Hello Everybody,

It started here so I will finish it here. The Astro Telescope 102mm F/11 Super Planetary that I thought was A piece of junk. I accidentally fixed it today. I removed the lens cell to take thread measurements. Well I dropped it on the floor, I figured no big deal its junk anyway. When I picked it up the lenses were loose. Apparently the lenses were slightly cockeyed being held in by the first lens retainer, the second retainer  that threads the cell into the scope body was also loosend by the drop that straightened out the lenses in the cell. Well I tightened down everything and gave it a try tonight on Jupiter, Saturn. and of course the Moon and Mars. And it is working and working pretty well. The views of Jupiter and Saturn were very beautiful at 137.5 X the Moon was totally amazing. I was able to run the throttle wide open at 343.75 X I'm glad that I did not give or throw this scope away. I Will put this down as a lesson on dont be in a rush nor panic and to try to do a better job trouble shooting the problems that will occur as I progress in this hobby. And I apologize if I rubbed anyone the wrong way on this issue. I'm a happy camper tonight.

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro

 

20200809 024031

Edited by Jethro7, 09 August 2020 - 04:00 AM.

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#368 Astrojensen

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 04:26 AM

Hello Everybody,

It started here so I will finish it here. The Astro Telescope 102mm F/11 Super Planetary that I thought was A piece of junk. I accidentally fixed it today. I removed the lens cell to take thread measurements. Well I dropped it on the floor, I figured no big deal its junk anyway. When I picked it up the lenses were loose. Apparently the lenses were slightly cockeyed being held in by the first lens retainer, the second retainer  that threads the cell into the scope body was also loosend by the drop that straightened out the lenses in the cell. Well I tightened down everything and gave it a try tonight on Jupiter, Saturn. and of course the Moon and Mars. And it is working and working pretty well. The views of Jupiter and Saturn were very beautiful at 137.5 X the Moon was totally amazing. I was able to run the throttle wide open at 343.75 X I'm glad that I did not give or throw this scope away. I Will put this down as a lesson on dont be in a rush nor panic and to try to do a better job trouble shooting the problems that will occur as I progress in this hobby. And I apologize if I rubbed anyone the wrong way on this issue. I'm a happy camper tonight.

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro

 

laugh.gif cool.gif

 

Oh, that's amazing! I'm happy to hear this!

 

I'm sorry for not coming back to you earlier, but I've been swamped with work and things needing attention and totally forgot. Sorry. An injured back didn't help. 

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark


Edited by Astrojensen, 09 August 2020 - 04:27 AM.

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#369 Jethro7

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 05:10 AM

laugh.gif cool.gif

 

Oh, that's amazing! I'm happy to hear this!

 

I'm sorry for not coming back to you earlier, but I've been swamped with work and things needing attention and totally forgot. Sorry. An injured back didn't help. 

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark

Hello Thomas,

I understand. I think that this scope heard me talking about getting a new set of lenses and adding 400.05mm to the scope body and turning it in to a 102mm F/15. And the cell jumped out of my hand. LOL...  you were right it was out of collimation and five minutes and a screw driver will fix it. And I tried to give it away and almost tossed it in the garbage. The lens retaining ring  may have been jostled loose in the mail, the second ring that screws into the scope body was loose the first time I removed the cell and their was just enough slack to jam the lenses slightly off. I guess like collimating my SCT, it does not take much to throw the collimation off any scope.

 

 

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro 


Edited by Jethro7, 09 August 2020 - 05:12 AM.

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#370 TG

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 07:38 AM

My planet killer for 2020:


Is that the 6in or the 7in?

#371 vahe

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 10:57 AM

After reading everyones comments regarding their favorite “planet Killers” I think that the following is the most valid definition for such a telescope:

.

Sky & Telescope November 2018 has an article on optimal aperture for viewing the Moon and planets by Thomas Dobbins, page 52.

.

“Based on five decades of observing through a vast array of telescopes, I’d venture to say that under excellent conditions, a 10 – or 12 – inch instruments of high quality is capable of revealing at least 75% of what can be seen on the Moon or brighter planets through even the largest Earth based instruments. The larger apertures required to see the remaining 25% involve rapidly diminishing marginal returns. Many of the finest images of the Moon and planets have been captured using 12 – to 16- inch instruments.
It’s no coincidence that this is the same size “sweet spot’ determined by so many visual observers generations ago.”

.

Vahe


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#372 Reid W

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 03:09 PM

Yes.  Just last Thursday my 210 gave the best view ever of Jupiter.



#373 TG

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 05:52 PM

Mars, at conjunction with the Moon, at 4am in stable seeing in the AP178 was a delight. It has been many years since Mars was at higher altitude for us northern observers. I observed it way into daylight and surprisingly no damage to the image happened even when surrounded by a blue sky in the eyepiece field.
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#374 jrbarnett

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Posted 12 August 2020 - 12:17 AM

Every few years out here on Cloudy Nights, I see someone post topics on Planet Killer telescopes.

With the Mars Opposition this year, and the conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn, I thought this would be a good time to stir up the excitement by asking what is your planet Killer scope this year, and post some cool photos of it.

I choose the refractor forum to post this since refractors seem to be the telescope of choice for "backyard" planetary observing. Sometimes, refractors are purchased to just enjoy the Moon and planets. While I don't agree that refractors are the best choice for planetary observing, they are easy to access and popular, and inch for inch, they put out the sharpest views compared to their reflector cousins.

For me, my planet killer has always been my largest scope, this should be my C11XLT. Having admitted this, in late 2018, I purchased a new APM 152ED refractor. 2019 was probably the worse year for planetary observing for most people, so I've only had one good night with excellent seeing conditions to confirm that the my new 6" refractor definitely qualifies as a formidable planet killer scope also.

I like refractors best. I like how they present the sky to us, and I like their slick looks also. I want my new 6" refractor to be my first choice whenever the skies are clear and the planets are out.
So for me, for 2020, I am calling my 152Ed my new Planet Killer.

...Ralph

12.5" f/5.5 Teeter/Zambuto with a Paracorr.

 

Best,

 

Jim



#375 luxo II

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Posted 12 August 2020 - 12:36 AM

"...It’s no coincidence that this is the same size “sweet spot’ determined by so many visual observers generations ago.”

Thankyou Vahe, that insight concurs with my experience as well. I just can't afford the 12" APO, though...

 

As Ralph remarked... I thought last was pretty poor weather-wise but this season is shaping up to be dreadful. Aside from COVID the past 6 months - April-June  usually the being the best - have been solidly wet, wet, wet... the big beastie has only seen starlight once since March. 


Edited by luxo II, 12 August 2020 - 12:43 AM.



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