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Whats your Planet Killer telescope for 2020?

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#51 Wildetelescope

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 10:30 PM

New mount!
Sears 60 mm achromat
Here is my planet killer!!smile.gif
 
 
AP152
AP Starfire 152 mm 
 
Or maybe this one!lol.gif
 
i always get get them mixed up!
 
jmd 

 


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#52 dusty99

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 10:33 PM

Usually my SW 120, as it's my most frequently used scope. But if I want to get serious about planets (like Mars last year), it's the C8.


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#53 RadioAstronomer

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 11:38 PM

My planet killer is the only scope that I currently own, a TV-102 f/8.6. In nights of good seeing my Supermonos and Pentax SMC orthos provide views that I did not think were possible with a 4". However where I work there is a 61" scope with incredible optics that was used to map the Moon for the Apollo landings (the Kuiper 61"on Mt. Bigelow). Every now and then they put an eyepiece and I'm hoping to see Mars at opposition with that beast..


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#54 Lookitup

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 11:41 PM

Here's mine always ready to tak it on. Due to exit pupil I miss the vixen 115s and SW120ed, but "crispness" of Jupiter, Saturn and Mars and super light weight, keeps me happy with the Tak DF. X240 is the limit, since I have floaters and the sky rarely allows more.

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Edited by Lookitup, 15 January 2020 - 11:58 PM.

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#55 aa6ww

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 12:32 AM

Takahashi really hit a Grand Slam with the new small body refractors in all sizes down to 60mm. I'm hoping we see a svelte 120 doublet Flourite doublet out of Takahashi soon.

 

...Ralph

 

Here's mine always ready to tak it on. Due to exit pupil I miss the vixen 115s and SW120ed, but "crispness" of Jupiter, Saturn and Mars and super light weight, keeps me happy with the Tak DF. X240 is the limit, since I have floaters and the sky rarely allows more.


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#56 viewer

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 01:17 AM

After trying to hunt down Mercury in February with my binoculars I will look into what my Travel can do for killing Venus, Jupiter and Saturn on my nightly walks.


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#57 AtmosFearIC

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 03:36 AM

I’ll be using an older a Mewlon 250 with the 3 veins and a DL. I’ll be attaching the DL to the rear of the Mewlon and because of the magical properties of the Tak Fluorite and their ability of photon multiplication, I’ll be constructing a planet killer.
I’ll be using my Glatter laser to fire a beam through the DL and into the Mewlon and then out to Jupiter. Due to the magical properties of fluorite, the power increase of this laser is the power of the F/Stops; 9^14 or 22.9E12 times the amount of power.

The Glatter has a 5mW output so it’ll become 114GW of RAW POWER!
It’s enough to launch the space shuttle 10X over but not a planet killer.

So, long story short... I’ll have two telescopes out this year but even the famed Tak fluorite isn’t a planet killer.
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#58 Stewc14

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 04:08 AM

If I can get them all set up at the same time it would be fun to compare what they can do. Our seeing is rarely great.
Tmb 228 my. My go to last year.
The 16 in. RCOS is surprisingly good
C 14 is ok
300 mewlon crs is new and untried
32 in reflector. Trouble with colimation
Still working out the bugs
Have not had the c11 out. For sale
C 8 for sale
6 in refractor of unknown maker is wide field and sharp. Great for an achro.
6 in f12 is good too.
There is more packed away.
Looking for a better location this summer to build something permanent to put everything in. My little dream. I just hope for better conditions this year to start with.
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#59 Hesiod

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 05:10 AM

My main objective for the upcoming opposition is a challenge of sort: I plan to use the FL55 to see how much detail could glimpse in a such small aperture.
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#60 25585

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 07:21 AM

My planet killer is the same tried and true refractor that shows variable stars, double stars, and everything else I want to see - my trusty Tak FS-128.

 

The main thing I need is clear skies for all of these celestial "events".

 

Cheers,

 

Ron

 

attachicon.gifFS-128 091519.JPG

Did you sell your TSA-120N....confused1.gif


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#61 25585

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 07:24 AM

Here's mine always ready to tak it on. Due to exit pupil I miss the vixen 115s and SW120ed, but "crispness" of Jupiter, Saturn and Mars and super light weight, keeps me happy with the Tak DF. X240 is the limit, since I have floaters and the sky rarely allows more.

Nice silver mounting rings!



#62 25585

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 07:28 AM

Takahashi really hit a Grand Slam with the new small body refractors in all sizes down to 60mm. I'm hoping we see a svelte 120 doublet Flourite doublet out of Takahashi soon.

 

...Ralph

That might be the end of TSA120s though, as was what happened with the 102 when FC100s were introduced.


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#63 Asbytec

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 07:29 AM

What's my planet killer? The one I currently use cooled, collimated, and otherwise prepped for observing as seeing permits.
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#64 Alan French

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 08:09 AM

More important is a location with good seeing and Mars high in the sky. Recent oppositions of Mars have suffered greatly because of the planet's low altitude from here at 43 degrees north.

 

Clear skies, Alan 


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#65 RAKing

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 08:11 AM

Did you sell your TSA-120N....confused1.gif

No, I cut down my sig line.

 

Cheers,

 

Ron


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#66 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 08:28 AM

What's my planet killer? The one I currently use cooled, collimated, and otherwise prepped for observing as seeing permits.

 

More important is a location with good seeing and Mars high in the sky. Recent oppositions of Mars have suffered greatly because of the planet's low altitude from here at 43 degrees north.

 

Clear skies, Alan 

 

Alan (and Norme.)

 

This opposition of Mars seems much better but Jupiter and Saturn are still low for observers in norther latitudes.  

 

I agree with you about the location with the good seeing..  For someone in the US, I am doing pretty good, the far southwestern corner near the ocean and typically south of the jet streams.. 

 

But Norme... his 8 inch Dob might not be the fanciest scope listed here but he's at 14 degrees north latitude in the Philippines, I think he's the one we all should be envying.  Jupiter and Saturn will be at about 60 degrees elevation... 

 

"When it comes to planetary viewing, seeing is not the most important thing, it's the only thing."  Uncle Rod.

 

jon


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#67 Galicapernistein

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 09:18 AM

SW 102 ED for quick looks, 8” F9 dob for more detailed views. WAY more detailed views.



#68 payner

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 09:48 AM

I believe most everyone understands seeing is always critical, but it's a variable that is difficult to address; not everyone wants or can move to Florida or the Canary Islands. With that, optimize your equipment (does not imply simply buying high-end scopes) to the degree one desires and can do comfortably. I can have some pretty good seeing myself, especially mid-spring through mid-fall.


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#69 Alan French

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 11:04 AM

There is some hope for Mars for the upcoming opposition from here. It will reach just over 52 degrees altitude when it transits at opposition. 

 

Clear skies, Alan


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#70 aa6ww

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 11:10 AM

I honestly believe the TSA-120 is on the way out. I saw the sell off of various versions of the TSA-102, slowing selling off the Short versions first, then the new svelte line of Tak 100's came online. Then the TSA-102 was dropped.
I've already seen a sale on the not retractable dew shield TSA-120's. I don't see any reason why Takahashi shouldn't sell a FC120 with a 115mm tube diameter, smaller then the TSA-120, same size as the TSA-102. That with a slick new look in various versions should put many people in a happy place with a 120mm refractor.
Lighter overall weight, smaller form factor. A 120 the size of their TSA-102. That would work for me.

My SW-120 uses the same diameter tube as my TSA-102 was, just a few inches longer, and the TSA had the retractable dew shield.

I believe that Takahashi can get a FC-120 in a TSA-102 body. Imagine a limited run of F/9 FC-120's along with a shorter F7 version. Both could easily be supported by an AVX size mount.

FC-60, FC76, FC100 has already happened, why not an FC120.

...Ralph


 

That might be the end of TSA120s though, as was what happened with the 102 when FC100s were introduced.


Edited by aa6ww, 16 January 2020 - 11:16 AM.

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#71 gezak22

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 11:21 AM

140 mm f/7 APM + Binotron + a pair of 10 mm Delos



#72 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 11:40 AM

I believe most everyone understands seeing is always critical, but it's a variable that is difficult to address; not everyone wants or can move to Florida or the Canary Islands. With that, optimize your equipment (does not imply simply buying high-end scopes) to the degree one desires and can do comfortably. I can have some pretty good seeing myself, especially mid-spring through mid-fall.

A couple of the things:

 

- The scope is not the most important factor in the equation.

 

- The optimal scope for Thomas Jensen at 55 degrees North is not the optimal scope for me at 32 degrees North.  In Roland's "What is the Best Planetary Telescope" he makes that clear but it's rarely discussed in threads like this.

 

- And we ought to be jealous of Norme because he's very likely got the best seeing.

 

Jon


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#73 Spikey131

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 11:46 AM

I have high hopes for good solar system observing with this 12.5” f/7 DOB I picked up:

 

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#74 Reid W

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 11:56 AM

I'm looking forward to my u210 this year.

For 20 years the star has been my ostahowski 10" f6. The C11 and binoviewers have given exemplary views too, but from quick lunar views, the mewlon may top both instruments.
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#75 payner

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 12:01 PM

A couple of the things:

 

- The scope is not the most important factor in the equation.

 

- The optimal scope for Thomas Jensen at 55 degrees North is not the optimal scope for me at 32 degrees North.  In Roland's "What is the Best Planetary Telescope" he makes that clear but it's rarely discussed in threads like this.

 

- And we ought to be jealous of Norme because he's very likely got the best seeing.

 

Jon

Yep, that's what I said "... seeing is always critical ..." Jealous? No, I'm content with where I am; there's always going to somewhere better or somewhere better with a better telescope, too. And yes, optimize the best scope one has available for the task at hand and make the most out of it.
 


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