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7 more doubles in Cassiopeia

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#1 flt158

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 11:47 AM

Good evening, everyone.

 

It was a windy Tuesday (14th January 2019) night in my back garden as I set up my William Optics 158 mm F/7 apochromatic refractor on its Berlebach Planet altazimuth mount. My finder scope is a William Optics 70 mm F/6 small apo. Mirror diagonals are fitted to both scopes. My north is to the left and my east is up. Seeing conditions were quite good. 

 

All my figures are from www.stelledoppie.it

 

1. Sigma Cassiopeia was my first port of call. I have reported on it before, but what an exquisite delight it is. Astronomers are not quite sure if it is a true binary. The magnitudes are: A = 5. B = 7.2. Sep = 3.1". PA = 326 degrees. Perfectly split at 112X. Both stars appear to be white.

 

2. STTA 251 is supposed to be a triple optical star system. But I could not see the C star at all no matter what magnifications I used - up to 280X. According to stelle doppie, the magnitudes should be: A = 6.9. B = 9.1. C = 11.7. There is another star which has a magnitude of 9.5 very close by to the north. Its designation is TYC 3651 109.  But that one does not appear to be of any concern to Stelle Doppie. It would be a D star if it was listed. So maybe we have a mystery. Comments are very welcome.

 

3. ES 1125 might be an uncertain double, but it is a good test for seeing conditions. The magnitudes are: A = 10.9. B = 11.1. Sep = 4.5". PA = 333 degrees. My scope managed to split cleanly at 140X and 167X. ES stands for Rev. Thomas Espin.

 

4. ES 2735 is a true binary. The magnitudes are: A = 8.9. B = 10.7. Sep = 12.6". PA = 99 degrees. I could just about split the 2 stars split at 40X. 112X was much more satisfying.

 

5. ES 1124 is an optical double star. The magnitudes are: A = 10.4. B = 10.9. Sep = 2.8". PA = 247 degrees. What an extremely attractive system it is! The 2 stars point downwards and were lovely and tight at 112X and 140X.

 

6. ES 700 is an uncertain double. The magnitudes are: A = 7.2. B = 11. Sep = 14.7". PA = 35 degrees. Good split at 112X.

 

7. ARY 33 is a true binary even though its separation is wide. The magnitudes are: A = 7.3. B = 8.1. Sep = 100.1". PA = 139 degrees. 40X is enough to see the 2 stars. But to check the colours I used 112X. The spectral classes are: A = G5. B = K2. Yellow and orange were the colours I observed. ARY stands for Robert Argyle.

 

I did observe one carbon star. 

Please have a read on the Observational Astrophysics forum. 

 

Thank you for reading. 

 

Comments are very welcome. 

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 

 


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#2 VanJan

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 05:16 PM

Observation of STTA 251 on Sept. 7, 2013 with 90mm refractor at 133X:  Pale red, lilac, no color. Bluish 8.5mv companion north.

 

I did not note any difficulty with the C component. Perhaps variable question.gif


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#3 RadioAstronomer

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 11:47 PM

Thanks for the report Aubrey. Cassiopeia and environs contain some of my favorite doubles. There is one of my discoveries in Camelopardalis that still awaits visual observation WRS 8 (WDS 03546+8002) 10.2/10.8, 3.2". I'd love to hear what you see if you decide to observe it someday.


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#4 R Botero

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 03:01 AM

Great report Aubrey. Thanks for sharing these triplets!

Roberto
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#5 flt158

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 10:05 AM

Observation of STTA 251 on Sept. 7, 2013 with 90mm refractor at 133X:  Pale red, lilac, no color. Bluish 8.5mv companion north.

 

I did not note any difficulty with the C component. Perhaps variable question.gif

Thank you for providing me with your observational details of STTA 251, VanJan. 

I can see you observed all 4 stars in this optical system.

Therefore I am going to need to check it out a second time. 

 

I wonder if indeed the C star is variable.

Time for me to inquire over on the Observational Astrophysics forum. 

 

Kind regards from Aubrey. 


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#6 ssmith

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 10:19 PM

 

2. STTA 251 is supposed to be a triple optical star system. But I could not see the C star at all no matter what magnifications I used - up to 280X. According to stelle doppie, the magnitudes should be: A = 6.9. B = 9.1. C = 11.7. There is another star which has a magnitude of 9.5 very close by to the north. Its designation is TYC 3651 109.  But that one does not appear to be of any concern to Stelle Doppie. It would be a D star if it was listed. So maybe we have a mystery. Comments are very welcome.

 

Hi Aubrey - 

 

Here is a photo of STTA 251.  It actually does have a D component as labeled in my photo.  I took a look at the mag 9.5 star you noted.  It is actually part of another cataloged pair - ACA18  (m 9.5, 13.2, 72",  219 deg).  I was dismayed to see that this obviously suspect pair was added to the WDS in 1999  - I checked GAIA and it is optical. I hate to see the WDS cluttered up with junk such as this.

 

STTA251 Cas C9 1-19-20 8fr PCC NonLinear rotate crop.jpg


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#7 rugby

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 11:49 PM

Aubrey: What temperature was it when you observed these pairs? I ask because I have had two clear moonless nights recently with temps of -8 c. I couldnt brave the cold, Am I getting weaker with age?



#8 flt158

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 09:47 AM

Aubrey: What temperature was it when you observed these pairs? I ask because I have had two clear moonless nights recently with temps of -8 c. I couldnt brave the cold, Am I getting weaker with age?

3 degrees Celsius, Rugby. 

What was more of a bother to me was the dampness in the air. 

As a result of sniffing Neil Med for 5 days afterwards - Yuck!!

 

I sometimes wonder how many hot drinks should amateur astronomers drink in 24 hours. 

Answers on a postcard for that one!! confused1.gif 

I don't remember ever observing at temperatures of -8 C.  

I'm nearly 60 years young. 

 

Clear skies to you, Rugby. 

 

Kind regards from Aubrey. 



#9 flt158

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 10:00 AM

Hi Aubrey - 

 

Here is a photo of STTA 251.  It actually does have a D component as labeled in my photo.  I took a look at the mag 9.5 star you noted.  It is actually part of another cataloged pair - ACA18  (m 9.5, 13.2, 72",  219 deg).  I was dismayed to see that this obviously suspect pair was added to the WDS in 1999  - I checked GAIA and it is optical. I hate to see the WDS cluttered up with junk such as this.

 

attachicon.gifSTTA251 Cas C9 1-19-20 8fr PCC NonLinear rotate crop.jpg

Right, Steve. 

The next time I am available and there are clear skies, I will observe once again STTA 251. 

Guide 9.1 does indeed show A, B, C and D. 

The program does match your inspiring image. 

All I had to do was to change the time to 4 UT. 

Whereas I will be observing this section of the sky at 20.30 UT. 

And with mirror diagonals fitted also. 

 

I am not confident I will see D. But I don't mind. 

It's C I want. 

And I won't be splitting ACA 18 any time soon either. 

But again, I don't mind. 

 

Owners of large telescope can try that one. 

 

I very much thank you, Steve, for all your help on sorting out STTA 251. waytogo.gif

It's great to have such friends here on Cloudy Nights. dalek12.gif

 

I wish you all clear skies. 

 

Aubrey. 



#10 flt158

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 12:58 PM

Hello everyone.

 

I can relax now.

On Tuesday night 28th January I observed once again STTA 251 and I did find the C star in its correct location. (I was looking in the wrong place.)
It was very cold in my back garden using my William Optics 158 mm apochromatic refractor.

It was +3 degrees Celsius which felt more like -1.
There was a 20 mph wind swirling around.
I had 6 layers of warm clothing on.

 

Anyway, that C star is extremely faint at 11.7 magnitude.
Its PA is 135 degrees. ( www.stelledoppie.it )
Separation was good: 46.6".
I needed 167X to spot it.
225X was good also.
There was no need to go higher.
Besides it was too windy.

 

Next time I must observe a carbon star.

I still have one more in Cassiopeia. 

 

My special thanks to Steve and Van Jan.  

 

Kindest regards,

Aubrey.


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