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#1 CinkBeast

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 03:59 PM

Hi,

I am a common naked-eye observer with some astronomy knowledge ( I know stars, planets, nebulae... ). I want to buy a beginner telescope.

A friend of mine told me about THE CELESTRON ASTROMASTER 90EQ, since he bought it. He said it’s very good for observing planets, the moon, and nebulae, but he didn’t mention any cons.

I was wondering if there’s maybe anyone out there in this vast universe, that had the same issues. If you have a recommendation, feel free to discuss. Pros and cons are welcome, written by all users of the telescope mentioned. 

 

Best Regards from the Northern Hemisphere.

-CinkBeast

 

I don’t know how to do this, so I posted the information in a post below.


Edited by CinkBeast, 17 January 2020 - 01:25 AM.


#2 Stellar1

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 04:13 PM

Maybe if we could ask you what your budget is? it would help us guide you a little better, i am willing to bet anything that most here have had a 6 inch dobsonian in their early years. 

This is pretty much the quintessential beginners scope for naked eye observing, extremely versatile in that department, everyone has fond memories of theirs. Posted below is a link

to such a scope, there are many manufacturers and sizes, this depends on your budget of course. Unfortunately i cannot speak of the Astromaster as i have never owned one, i'm sure

it is a great scope also.

https://www.telescop...pe/p/102004.uts


Edited by Stellar1, 16 January 2020 - 04:18 PM.

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#3 hiMike

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 04:15 PM

Hey there and welcome to Cloudy Nights!

 

What is your budget? Do you want a scope that has any automated features? (tracking, go-to)

Since you already know the night sky, and since you mentioned Nebulae, I would highly recommend a dobsonian telescope. Its the best "bang for your buck" so far as aperture/dollar. They aren't guided and don't have any go-to features, but if you know the sky its no issue! These are nice because they grab a lot of light (necessary for deep sky objects like nebulae) and they have a wider field of view (compared to the refractor your friend recommended).

 

Here is a pretty common begginer dob (8" for <$400)

https://www.amazon.c...e/dp/B001DDW9V6

 

Here is another highly regarded one on this forum (5" for $200)

https://shop.astrono...ector-telescope


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#4 Tulloch

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 04:17 PM

Hi there, I got its big brother, the 130EQ, second hand off eBay. I struggled with it to make it work for me, alignment was difficult, keeping anything in the field of view was hard, every time you touched it to focus or follow an object it would shake for 5 seconds, the cons were significant. It was a happy day when I bought it, but an even happier day when I on-sold it to some other poor sucker.

 

The real questions I would have for you are: what do you want to look at through the telescope, and how much are you willing to pay? Unless you live in a dark location (or are willing to travel to one), you are not going to see much through any scope aside from the solar system objects. If the planets are your main interest (as they are mine), then a nice Celestron 6SE would be a great start but it costs a lot more. However, you might be able to pick one up cheap on the 2nd hand market (as I did) and you are away! 

 

Good luck!

 

Andrew


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#5 slepage

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 04:17 PM

Hi and welcome to CN.  I see that this is you 1st post.  Anyway,  you asked a very difficult questions that has more answers then probably what you would want.  The short answer is that it might be a good scope for you and it might not be.  Help us out by supplying us with more info.  What is your budget?  Do you want this scope to grow with your experience level or do you just want to test the waters and if you like it then you would by another scope?  Are you Ok with the fact that the mount that it comes with does not have a motor drive and GoTo capabilities?



#6 Jeff Struve

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 04:18 PM

Agreed... for visual astronomy, a 6" or 8" Dob should work very well... and still be a keeper if you move to more elaborate needs/desires...



#7 vtornado

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 04:42 PM

Hello CinkBeast and welcome to cloudy nights.

 

I do not have a celestron astromaster 90, but my thoughts based upon other scope I have had is as follow.

 

Pros:

Long refractor, limited chromatic aberration, easy on eyepieces, no need for optical adjustment (collimation)

 

Cons:

Probably the mount is shaky, There is some chromatic aberration, (CA) probably enough to degrade Jupiter, Mars.

Only 90mm of aperture.  For dimmer targets, it does not have enough aperture to pull them, out of

light pollution.  If you will be primarily observing from a dark place then no problem.  EQ mounts are not

as intuitive to point in the sky for a beginner.  (altitude-azimuth) Alt-Az is easier.

 

Alternatives.

These are all variants of a dob.  In general what the dob buys you is.

Most aperture per dollar.

Super stable mount no shakes.

You can make a home made push to system to find faint targets in light pollution.

Reflector so no CA

You will have to collimate them from time to time for highest performance

 

Orion 4.5 inch dob.  Smallest non table top dob.  An adult will have to put it on a small table, or

some bricks etc to bring the eyepiece up to a comfortable viewing height.  Can be carried with

one hand.  Long tube, easy to collimate and easy on eyepieces.

 

6 inch dob.  A much more capable scope.  Bigger and heavier but no harder to set up.

If stored in a warm house and taken outside on a cold day, you will have to wait about 30 minutes.

for it to cool down.  Once again easy on eyepieces, and collimation.

 

Table top dob. Zhummel 130 or AWB one sky.

Super small and portable.  Wide field of view which helps to find object easier than a longer scope.

You will have to collimate this often, and wide views will require better eyepieces.

 

Hope this helps.

VT


Edited by vtornado, 16 January 2020 - 04:47 PM.


#8 SeattleScott

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 04:54 PM

With most entry level packages, manufacturers skimp on the mount. A beginner will look at a $200 refractor and a $300 refractor and see they have the same aperture, and buy the $200 one. So manufacturers are almost forced to put entry level scopes on substandard mounts because a beginner doesn’t know the difference and won’t pay for a suitable mount. So I say don’t blame Celestron, blame consumers for having unrealistic expectations about what a telescope suitable for stargazing should cost. If Celestron didn’t sell these scopes someone else will, and others do.

Scott
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#9 astrodom

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 05:00 PM

 As was mentioned earlier,  please consider joining a local astronomy club to see what types of scopes the various owners use.  You may be surprised at the amount of choices you have, but many of the smaller dobsonians that were already suggested sounds like a great place to start.  I started with an 8" dob and still use it from time to time. Good luck!


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#10 rhetfield

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 05:01 PM

Hey there and welcome to Cloudy Nights!

 

What is your budget? Do you want a scope that has any automated features? (tracking, go-to)

Since you already know the night sky, and since you mentioned Nebulae, I would highly recommend a dobsonian telescope. Its the best "bang for your buck" so far as aperture/dollar. They aren't guided and don't have any go-to features, but if you know the sky its no issue! These are nice because they grab a lot of light (necessary for deep sky objects like nebulae) and they have a wider field of view (compared to the refractor your friend recommended).

 

Here is a pretty common begginer dob (8" for <$400)

https://www.amazon.c...e/dp/B001DDW9V6

 

Here is another highly regarded one on this forum (5" for $200)

https://shop.astrono...ector-telescope

I would 2nd the OneSky.  It is compact, simple, has good optics and has a very good thread here that is very informative.  It functions well as a general purpose scope that can see a lot of different stuff.  The scope plus a UHC filter and a 2x barlow will be about the same price as the EQ 90.



#11 ShaulaB

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 06:43 PM

Why do you want more aperture (width of the major optical component, lens or mirror)?

 

Two reasons.

1) The wider the mirror or lens, the fainter objects you can see. I was able to observe all 110 Messier objects with a 6" f8 reflector. Six inches is around 150mm aperture, vs. 90mm for the scope you mentioned.

2) The wider the mirror or lens, the better resolution of fine features you can get. For example, you would be able to see smaller craters on the Moon, more "bands" on the surface of Jupiter, and galactic structure with a wider aperture scope.

 

Another reason if focal length. Six or eight inch Dobsonians will have over 1200mm focal length, where the refractor will have a focal length of around 900mm. The longer the focal length, the more magnification you can get with the same eyepieces. This is a boost for planet and lunar viewing.

 

That's why the folks here suggest 6" or 8" (200mm aperture) scopes rather than a 90mm scope.

 

I can fit a 10" Dobsonian into my small car. And I am over 60 years old, and I can still carry it.

 

Yes, visit a star party hosted by a local club, it would be educational.


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#12 CinkBeast

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 01:11 AM

Thanks for all the answers.

My budget is actually under 400€, best if around 300€. As I already told you, I would watch planets and other celestial objects, but probably not stars ( too much ). I should also tell you im 45 degrees N, and I live in the ‘suburbs’ of my town and there’s a port, which lead to quite a lot of light pollution. I would prefer the equatoriall mount, due to the fact I’m already familliar with it, but I will take a closer look to The Celestron Nexstar 6SE. I hope to find a cheaper, but a well-preserved second-hand telescope of that type.

I would also like to know where you bought The Nexstar from second-hand.

 

Hope to hear from you again!

-CinkBeast


Edited by CinkBeast, 17 January 2020 - 01:15 AM.


#13 Tulloch

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 05:50 AM

Thanks for all the answers.

My budget is actually under 400€, best if around 300€. As I already told you, I would watch planets and other celestial objects, but probably not stars ( too much ). I should also tell you im 45 degrees N, and I live in the ‘suburbs’ of my town and there’s a port, which lead to quite a lot of light pollution. I would prefer the equatoriall mount, due to the fact I’m already familliar with it, but I will take a closer look to The Celestron Nexstar 6SE. I hope to find a cheaper, but a well-preserved second-hand telescope of that type.

I would also like to know where you bought The Nexstar from second-hand.

 

Hope to hear from you again!

-CinkBeast

Hi again, I live in Australia and was able to get my Celestron GoTo mount (it was actually the Evolution model, but very similar to the SE version) from eBay Australia. I don't know what's available in your area, or how much you might be able to find one for, but you might be able to find a few available especially after Christmas as unwanted presents online or in second-hand stores.

 

Make no mistake, it is significantly more expensive than the Dobsonians that others here have suggested, however I would really recommend a computerised GoTo scope on an altaz mount. Alignment is easy, just find a clear space to set up (in any orientation), point it at three bright stars with the hand controller (you don't even need to know what they are called) and you are aligned. Then just tell the mount what to point at (eg Jupiter, Orion, SAO 129706) and the mount will automatically slew to the right coordinates or very close to it. The best thing is that once you have it in the field of view, the object stays fixed in the eyepiece rather than having to keep making slight little movements every minute. 

 

Spend more time observing, and less time hunting.

 

Check the second hand market in your area, and even if you find that it's not the scope for you, you should be able to re-sell it on to someone else who want to look at the stars.

 

Hope this helps, Andrew.


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#14 Ulmer Spatz

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 06:00 AM

I would 2nd the OneSky.  It is compact, simple, has good optics and has a very good thread here that is very informative.  It functions well as a general purpose scope that can see a lot of different stuff.  The scope plus a UHC filter and a 2x barlow will be about the same price as the EQ 90.

The OneSky telescope is the same scope as the Sky-Watcher Heritage 130. I don't think you can order the OneSky in Slovenia.



#15 CinkBeast

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 09:33 AM

Hi again, I live in Australia and was able to get my Celestron GoTo mount (it was actually the Evolution model, but very similar to the SE version) from eBay Australia. I don't know what's available in your area, or how much you might be able to find one for, but you might be able to find a few available especially after Christmas as unwanted presents online or in second-hand stores.

 

Make no mistake, it is significantly more expensive than the Dobsonians that others here have suggested, however I would really recommend a computerised GoTo scope on an altaz mount. Alignment is easy, just find a clear space to set up (in any orientation), point it at three bright stars with the hand controller (you don't even need to know what they are called) and you are aligned. Then just tell the mount what to point at (eg Jupiter, Orion, SAO 129706) and the mount will automatically slew to the right coordinates or very close to it. The best thing is that once you have it in the field of view, the object stays fixed in the eyepiece rather than having to keep making slight little movements every minute. 

 

Spend more time observing, and less time hunting.

 

Check the second hand market in your area, and even if you find that it's not the scope for you, you should be able to re-sell it on to someone else who want to look at the stars.

 

Hope this helps, Andrew.

 

I’ve checked it out and it’s quite over my budget. I found someone that would sell it second-hand, but it’s way more expensive than a new one from Amazon. I was wondering if you maybe know any other ( cheaper ) GoTo telesopes.

I found one I like, but I would like you opinion first. Click here for link. I can wiggle the budget a little bit, but only this much. I want to know if it's easy to navigate with a GoTo telescope, without using the automatic finder. Also is the finderscope good, and if you bought any additional equipment for it.

 

Thanks for the help so far, CinkBeast


Edited by CinkBeast, 17 January 2020 - 10:26 AM.


#16 hiMike

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 01:17 PM

I know this sounds obvious, but your budget gets split between two things: the optical tube assembly (OTA, aka scope), and the mount. A good go-to mount is very expensive, so they will typically put a lesser quality OTA on it to keep it inexpensive. If you want a quality go-to and OTA, the starting point is roughly double your budget. On the contrary, the typical dobsonian is a really high quality OTA put onto a very inexpensive mount (its still a great mount due to the physics, but its typically just plywood). You'll have to decide which is more important to you

 

Have you heard of "push to"? Instead of the scope automatically going to Alt/Az coordinates, you use a setting circle and digital level to "push" your scope to the correct coordinates. You can print the circle yourself and then get a cheap digital level for < $20 (see below). You can then use a free app like SkySafari to look up the Alt/Az coordinates for your object at your GPS coordinates. This would allow you to put the money towards better optics. Great system for those on a budget!

 

https://www.amazon.c...45&sr=8-1-fkmr2


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#17 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 02:09 PM

On the contrary, the typical dobsonian is a really high quality OTA put onto a very inexpensive mount (its still a great mount due to the physics, but its typically just plywood).

Mass-produced Dob mounts are usually made of particle board.



#18 CinkBeast

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 04:52 PM

Mass-produced Dob mounts are usually made of particle board.

Do Dobs have the Equatorial mount ( movement ), or not, and is it worth buying a telescope that is stuck to the floor, since it doesn’t have a tripod?



#19 Beeham

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 05:13 PM

I second the recommendation for a Dob.  The lack of tracking is (in my mind) a fair trade for rock-solid stability and freedom from vibration, and you get a lot of nice aperture for a relatively low price.

 

Push-to is a great skill to develop, also.  With an app like Stellarium to give you alt/az coordinates and a little practice you will be probably get good at locating stuff very quickly.

 

Hope this helps!



#20 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 05:28 PM

Do Dobs have the Equatorial mount ( movement ), or not, and is it worth buying a telescope that is stuck to the floor, since it doesn’t have a tripod?D

Dob is short for Dobsonian, which refers to a type of very stable alt-azimuth mount championed by John Dobson.  A Dob can be placed on an equatorial or Poncet platform to track objects or it can be quipped with a stepper motor drive.

http://www.equatorialplatforms.com/

 

http://www.reinervog...lattform_e.html

 

http://www.jlc.net/~...ncet/Intro.html

 

https://www.telescop...60/p/102020.uts

 

https://www.highpoin...ASAAEgJ6wPD_BwE

 

https://www.astrosystems.biz/drive.htm

 

I own over a dozen telescopes but only three equatorial mounts.  The rest have Dob or alt-azimuth mounts.  Dobs are far easier to use than equatorially-mounted telescopes.



#21 Tulloch

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 05:46 PM

I’ve checked it out and it’s quite over my budget. I found someone that would sell it second-hand, but it’s way more expensive than a new one from Amazon. I was wondering if you maybe know any other ( cheaper ) GoTo telesopes.

I found one I like, but I would like you opinion first. Click here for link. I can wiggle the budget a little bit, but only this much. I want to know if it's easy to navigate with a GoTo telescope, without using the automatic finder. Also is the finderscope good, and if you bought any additional equipment for it.

 

Thanks for the help so far, CinkBeast

Hi again, thanks for your reply, it's a bit strange that a used telescope should sell for more than a new one, but maybe it comes with extra eyepieces and other stuff? 

 

The 130SLT is a cheaper 5" Newtonian on a goto mount, I believe the tube assembly itself is the same as the one used on the AstroMaster 130EQ but put onto an electronic mount. With the standard eyepieces provided, objects like the planets will be tiny, you will need to buy a high power eyepiece (or a Barlow lens) to see the rings of Saturn clearly. As an example, I took a photo of Saturn with my AstroMaster 130EQ with an Orion 3mm "Edge-On planetary" eyepiece and my iPhone, the image is attached here. This is typical of what you might expect with this scope and a higher magnification eyepiece (or 3x Barlow lens on the highest magnification eyepiece supplied with the scope), and is about the maximum magnification you will achieve with it, but you will need to spend more money frown.gif . The finderscope will be fine, and if you use an app like SkySafari (even the free version) you should be able to find what you want.

 

I did a quick search for the online used market in Solvenia, and came up with this, but the price is negotiable. However, if you are patient, something might come up on this website that will give you what you want.

 

https://www.bolha.co...m-oglas-2771060

 

Hope this helps, Andrew

Attached Thumbnails

  • Saturn 1a.png

Edited by Tulloch, 17 January 2020 - 05:51 PM.

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#22 lonn

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 11:49 PM

Ok, I have basically the same scope as the AstroMaster 130EQ. Its a ok scope, the go to  is ok too. Then I got a 8in dob. What you can see in the 8in dob just blows away what you can see in a 5in.   


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#23 CinkBeast

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 05:01 AM

So I've done some research on telescopes, and saved all most suitable for me. I will watch some videos on these, and when I eliminate some, I can share the Amazon list with whoever wants to help. I also decided, due to my quick change of interest, I will wait around 1 or 2 months before buying it, but I will keep watching and learning as a naked-eye observer.

 

I also saw a lot of filters, and I wounder if they're useful, like the deep-sky filter, or the different colored moon filters. If anyone maybe owns such filters, do you find them useful, and if you have maybe taken any pictures, feel free to share them on this forum.

To anyone who would like to see the Amazon list message me, and I can send all links, or share the list.

 

Do the telescopes, that elongate, like The Skywatcher Heritage 130p FlexTube Dobsonian, actually magnify the object, by extending, or if not, what does that piece do?

 

-Best Regards, CinkBeast


Edited by CinkBeast, 18 January 2020 - 05:04 AM.


#24 Ulmer Spatz

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 05:49 AM

Do the telescopes, that elongate, like The Skywatcher Heritage 130p FlexTube Dobsonian, actually magnify the object, by extending, or if not, what does that piece do?

This design is a clever storage solution. Before use, you extend the scope all the way and lock it into that full-out extension with two thumb screws.

 

And speaking of storage: Sometimes people reject the idea of a Dobsonian because of storage considerations. But with the optical tube pointing straight up, a medium-sized Dobsonian can actually take less floor space than a tripod with its legs angled out enough to be a stable platform for mount and scope. Plus, a straight-up Dobsonian fits tightly into a corner of a room, unlike a mount and scope on an extended tripod.


Edited by Ulmer Spatz, 18 January 2020 - 08:05 AM.

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#25 CinkBeast

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 07:51 AM

This design is a clever storage solution. Before use, you extend the scope all the way and lock it into that full-out extension with two thumb screws.

 

And speaking of storage: Sometimes people reject the idea of a Dobsonian because of storage considerations. But with the optical tube pointing straight up, a medium-sized Dobsonian can actually take less floor space than a tripod with its legs angled out enough to be a stable platform for mount and scope. Plus, a straight-up Dobsonian fits tightly into a corner of a room, unlike a scope on an extended tripod.

I found this one, which is easily affordable, but comments say it doesn't have a good magnification. That is not a problem, since there's a 30 euro 8mm Barlow Lens ( I was actually wondering why Barlow Lenses are so popular, if you know ). Check it out on Amazon.




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