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Want a Planet killer-suggest some

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184 replies to this topic

#176 turtle86

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 07:06 PM

In regards to size I believe 10" to be around the minimum but 12" - 16" is the sweet spot for most locations but this depends on your local seeing conditions of course.    

 

When it comes to design I have seen good images from these designs:

SCT and the variants (Edge etc)

Newtonian

DK

cassegrain

All designs have their quirks you just have to figure out what they are and how to overcome them to get the most out of your telescope.

I have to say the best telescope is the one you will use the most! 

 

Its worth mentioning the focal length of the telescope should be larger enough so the least amount of glass is used in the system. For example having the focal length large enough so you don't have to use a barlow! 

 

Attached is an image from a 11" edge telescope under under good conditions. Planet killers come in all shapes and sizes as long as you have the skills.  

 

 

Very nice image! 


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#177 troyt

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Posted 20 February 2020 - 05:10 AM

Very nice image! 

Thanks I posted it to show some mass produced telescope can be well suited for this type of observing/imaging.



#178 bunyon

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Posted 20 February 2020 - 11:44 AM

A lot of interesting observations to digest. I guess I come down that seeing is, by far, the most important consideration in killing a planet.

 

So. Buy a telescope. Doesn't matter which one. 

 

Take it to the high Andes and set it up. Make sure a planet is going to be in the sky before making the trip. 

 

 

Seriously, a quality Newtonian that you know how to handle. If you're able to cool and collimate the Newt, it'll pay off. The details are fun to discuss on a cloudy night but under the sky, so many of today's scopes give a killer view that it mostly comes down to personal preference in setting the equipment up. 

 

For the OP, either of the first two Dobs listed will give excellent planetary views. I'm not sure I'd invest in another scope - especially a smaller scope if similarly difficult to set up and optimize - just for planets.



#179 a__l

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Posted 20 February 2020 - 08:34 PM

Seriously, a quality Newtonian that you know how to handle. If you're able to cool and collimate the Newt, it'll pay off. The details are fun to discuss on a cloudy night but under the sky, so many of today's scopes give a killer view that it mostly comes down to personal preference in setting the equipment up. 

 

This is not enough. See how the ground warmed up in a day, how long this heat will flow and how close the optics are to the ground.


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#180 Josef-cz

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 11:11 AM

The real killer of the planets is this optical construction, the optical laws cannot be bypassed, during my optical experiments I found that already at 15% obstruction the image in the telescope spoils, I attach a few live recordings, because only a live recording will show the true quality of the telescope. large magnifications.

https://www.youtube....eature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube....eature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube....h?v=SKsrIpI9lwE

https://www.youtube....h?v=J684xshhx8s



#181 icomet

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 01:55 PM

This might work for one.

 

Clear Skies.

Attached Thumbnails

  • f_8 Lockwood serial number.jpg

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#182 Deep13

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 02:40 PM

I'd use that 12" regardless of the go-to problems. Aperture rules. Maybe a 5mm T6 to go with it.
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#183 havasman

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 03:24 PM

This might work for one.

 

Clear Skies.

I'd bet on it. Best planetary scope I ever saw has a Lockwood mirror, 32" f3.3.



#184 stargazer193857

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Posted 18 June 2020 - 05:27 PM

This is not enough. See how the ground warmed up in a day, how long this heat will flow and how close the optics are to the ground.


That is probably the biggest factor for most people. Ground thermals and roof thermals. A big grassy field would solve that. Also how high the opening is off the ground.


An 8" that usually have bad views have it's best views on a lawn. I did not realize that was the reason at the time.

Also my 114mm on a tripod gave better views than my Starblast 6 ever did. I viewed it seated on the ground though.

There are optical reasons to be seated up comfortably, not just secondary size.

#185 Asbytec

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 04:57 AM

The real killer of the planets is this optical construction, the optical laws cannot be bypassed, during my optical experiments I found that already at 15% obstruction the image in the telescope spoils, I attach a few live recordings, because only a live recording will show the true quality of the telescope. large magnifications.

https://www.youtube....eature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube....eature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube....h?v=SKsrIpI9lwE

https://www.youtube....h?v=J684xshhx8s

I think the videos show how important seeing conditions are. Nice scope, no doubt about that. 




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