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First time photographing the moon

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#1 tna

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 10:56 AM

Hey all!

I'm a complete newbie to star gazing, but also to astrophotography (also don't have lot of experience from normal photography either, except snapping photos with cell phone).

I was wondering as the first ones of half moon came out great, showing nicely sharp details of moon's craters etc. When I took shots of the full moon the surface was not so sharp anymore. I figured that maybe the brightness of full moon is doing it and I didn't have the knowledge to adjust the settings accordingly. It is a bit hard to adjust the telescope focus through the camera screen, but I think I got it focused good on it, at least it was good during the half moon photos.

What do you think. Thanks in advance!!


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Edited by tna, 17 January 2020 - 01:52 PM.

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#2 petert913

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 11:20 AM

Very Nice !!



#3 DioGo_astro

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 11:29 AM

Those are very nice pics! As you noticed, taking photos of the full Moon is not a good idea if you want detail and contrast. The lunar terminator (the area between darkness and illumination) is the region where the shadows create that feeling of elevation and texture. With the full Moon, you don't have shadows anywhere.


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#4 Ring_Singularity

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 11:54 AM

I was wondering when the best time to photograph the moon is to garner the maximum crater detail!  I'm using a superzoom camera (around 1000mm EFL and f/5.6).  Would it be fair to say the best time to photograph it is either first quarter or last quarter?



#5 Ring_Singularity

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 11:56 AM

Hey all!

I'm a complete newbie to star gazing, but also to astrophotography (also don't have lot of experience from normal photography either, except snapping photos with cell phone).

I was wondering as the first ones of half moon came out great, showing nicely sharp details of moon's craters etc. When I took shots of the full moon the surface was not so sharp anymore. I figured that maybe the brightness of full moon is doing it and I didn't have the knowledge to adjust the settings accordingly. It is a bit hard to adjust the telescope focus through the camera screen, but I think I got it focused good on it, at least it was good during the half moon photos.

What do you think. Thanks in advance!!

f1762a58ec1fee0f57324b196aedf954.jpg

a8d7cc11c5ea6f632e8f1bdb00b5d979.jpg

I love the crater detail in the first shot!  Was that from last quarter phase (which was about a week and a half ago)?  What was the time there when you took them?  Thanks!


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#6 kathyastro

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 12:10 PM

Nice images!  They look decently-focused to me, and the exposure is good. 

 

As others nave noted, there are no shadows at full Moon.  The sunlight is coming from behind you, so the light is very flat. 



#7 tna

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 01:03 PM

Thanks for all for the comments! :)

I had to turn the telescope upside down to get it right hand side, because of the location of the moon and size of our tiny balcony. That was when photographing the full moon. Guess that does not matter?


Ring_Singularity: This photo is taken 3rd of Jan and that photo in the first post is probably 4th of Jan. Taken around 9-10 pm.

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Edited by tna, 17 January 2020 - 01:55 PM.

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#8 Swordfishy

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 04:25 PM

If these are single frames, that is superb!

 

 If you want more detail you must dial back the iso or exposure. 

 

 I tend to use 1/250 or 1/500 and adjust the ISO so that I can see the details without washing them out... However I also take 1000 or so frames and put them all together into one picture, which vastly improves the detail.


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#9 tna

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 04:49 PM

If these are single frames, that is superb!

If you want more detail you must dial back the iso or exposure.

I tend to use 1/250 or 1/500 and adjust the ISO so that I can see the details without washing them out... However I also take 1000 or so frames and put them all together into one picture, which vastly improves the detail.

Yes these are single frames. Haven't thought about stacking images, might need try and see how to do that. I'm new to this so still figuring out good settings. Not quite sure what the iso was on the half moons, on the full it was 100.

#10 sunnyday

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 05:03 PM

very nice pics



#11 Ring_Singularity

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 05:41 PM

If these are single frames, that is superb!

 

 If you want more detail you must dial back the iso or exposure. 

 

 I tend to use 1/250 or 1/500 and adjust the ISO so that I can see the details without washing them out... However I also take 1000 or so frames and put them all together into one picture, which vastly improves the detail.

whats a good stacking program to use?  I use DSS for starry night pics but it doesn't seem to work for these.

 

and I get weird errors with Registax.


Edited by Ring_Singularity, 17 January 2020 - 05:42 PM.


#12 DioGo_astro

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 05:49 PM

whats a good stacking program to use?  I use DSS for starry night pics but it doesn't seem to work for these.

 

and I get weird errors with Registax.

Try with AutoStakkert, it's meant for lunar and planetary stacking, and it's free


Edited by DioGo_astro, 17 January 2020 - 05:50 PM.

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#13 namh

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 06:47 PM

Ditto on AutoStakkert if you are using video. Great for solar, planetary, and lunar stacking.

 

Nice job on a single frame capture!

 

JB


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#14 AstroChampion

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 01:21 PM

Great photo. I’ve noticed the same effect even when sketching the moon, if it’s in a half or quarter, I end up liking my sketch, and seems to have good contrast and depth, but when it’s full, even after hours of sketching I just want to throw the result away. But I usually can’t find the trash can to do so because I’m blinded for about 20 minutes from staring at the full moon for so long... 😂
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#15 Peregrinatum

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 01:26 PM

Looks good... work on focus, don't let the histogram get past 3/4 of the way over to the right to leave room for processing, exp is in the 0.001 range with 200ISO.


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#16 tna

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 11:06 AM

Thank you all!

I was suprised also that how bright moon is viewed through the telescope eyepiece. No wonder why it is warned everywhere not to look sun through the telescope.

#17 tna

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 12:42 PM

What kind of target Venus is for photographing? I looked at it through the telescope and it looked like what I've seen, but smaller. :D Did not help much when I changed to 10mm eyepiece, still quite small. I have a skymax 127, so it is probably a rather small scope. Then I attached the camera to it but was unable to find it on the camera screen, even I centered it on a 25mm eyepiece. Thought I would have enough time to switch to camera but could not see it on the camera screen anymore.

#18 DioGo_astro

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 06:29 PM

What kind of target Venus is for photographing? I looked at it through the telescope and it looked like what I've seen, but smaller. laugh.gif Did not help much when I changed to 10mm eyepiece, still quite small. I have a skymax 127, so it is probably a rather small scope. Then I attached the camera to it but was unable to find it on the camera screen, even I centered it on a 25mm eyepiece. Thought I would have enough time to switch to camera but could not see it on the camera screen anymore.

I think you need something like a C11 or bigger to resolve detail on Venus' atmosphere. Otherwise, you would be limited to photographing its phases. Some people also use UV or IR pass filters to enhance contrast and reduce effects of dispersion.


Edited by DioGo_astro, 21 January 2020 - 06:29 PM.

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#19 Stephen Kennedy

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 01:44 AM

Imaging Venus is very difficult because it never gets really high in the sky.  Right now it is getting higher in the sky each night and will continue doing that through February and will reach greatest elongation in March which will be the best time to attempt a photograph..  The in its phases will be interesting to follow but it is unlikely you will see any details in its clouds.       


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#20 tna

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 02:54 PM

Thank you for the answers.

I was little suprised how small Venus looked through the eyepiece, but it is a lot smaller than for example Jupiter even if it is lot closer.

Smallest eyepiece I have is 10mm and that gives 150x, right? And maximum feasible magnification for that scope is somewhere around 250x. Some source gave it little over 300x, but 250x is about high as you want to go?

I'm still studying this so my knowledge is limited. I've rrad the quality of star diagonal also affects the quality of the image? Guess skymax has an ok diagonal?
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#21 kathyastro

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 03:30 PM

I am not sure what scope you have - there are several different sizes of Skymax - but 10mm is probably at or over the highest reasonable magnification.  The normal maximum in average conditions is a magnification equal to your aperture.  So if you have a 150mm scope, you would expect the be able to use 150x magnification.

 

In rare, exceptionally good conditions, you can push it up to double that (so 300x for a 150mm scope), and that is what manufacturers advertise.  But that might only happen one or two nights a year.


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#22 tna

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 05:48 PM

It's a skymax 127.
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#23 Ring_Singularity

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 12:00 PM

I think you need something like a C11 or bigger to resolve detail on Venus' atmosphere. Otherwise, you would be limited to photographing its phases. Some people also use UV or IR pass filters to enhance contrast and reduce effects of dispersion.

Venus is a rather drab target!  Actually imaging something like Jupiter or Saturn would be much more interesting.  Even a superzoom camera can do that and bring out banding detail in Jupiter and the rings and Cassini division on Saturn!  The higher end superzooms like the Nikon P900 and P1000 can even show the Martian polar ice cap!


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#24 tna

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 01:39 PM

I agree, I just took some photos of it and.. not nearly as magnificent as the moon.. :D

Edited by tna, 03 February 2020 - 01:39 PM.


#25 gitane71

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Posted 04 February 2020 - 09:05 AM

tna,  I would like to respectfully disagree.

I think your pix of the full moon is fine.

Everything has its season and things change, even the full moon.

Look along the limb, near Grimaldi, below Tycho and in the north.

You've focused sharply and you can see 'bumps' along the limb.  

Notice where Mare Crisium, Mare Frigoris or Grimaldi are compared to the limb.

Those will change as the moon 'wobbles', 'libration'.  

Even in 'regular photography', there is a 'golden hour', before sunset 

and after sunrise.  The full moon is like shooting 'here' at noon.

 I think you're doing fine.  

watch for Mare Orientale.  




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