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Cloudy night outreach

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#1 Steve C.

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 12:35 PM

Last night I took part in one of our club's Astronomy on Wheels program at a local elementary school. The night was damp and overcast, so we set up some telescopes inside and focused them on various things for people to look through. When we have these cloudy nights, we call this a "petting zoo".  Here I am explaining just what this little scope is:

 

q1.jpg


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#2 Gregory Gross

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 12:42 PM

That is an absolutely awesome picture, Steve! Thanks for sharing!



#3 Ericco79

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 12:58 PM

Great idea and great picture too! Those Questars are in a class by themselves, and always steal the show at any outreach I go to that has them.

 

Eric


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#4 Erik Bakker

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 01:17 PM

Wonderful Steve!



#5 Les Aperture

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 06:44 PM

Tape a bill on the wall under a good light.

The children will delight in reading the micro printing.

 

"Les"


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#6 JamesMStephens

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 07:29 PM

Tape a bill on the wall under a good light.

The children will delight in reading the micro printing.

 

"Les"

You got that from the little owner's manual, didn't you?



#7 Les Aperture

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 07:53 PM

You got that from the little owner's manual, didn't you?

Actually, personal experience.

 

"Les"


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#8 RalphMeisterTigerMan

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 10:06 PM

I have been monitoring this thread for a while. After some thinking I have come to the conclusion that the Questar 3.5 is perhaps the best telescope for Community Outreach Astronomy in a class room setting. It's the perfect size and built (almost) like a tank, but I'm pretty sure that everyone like me who shares the night sky with others asks people not to touch the equipment.

 

Also, the Questar is a beautiful telescope, with its brushed aluminum and vibrant colours it is a scope that's hard to ignore. You are doing a valueable service by showing school kids about telescopes. Some may end up becoming amateurs themselves plus it gets them asking questions like: why can't we see the stars in the city like we can when we go camping or are visiting a National Park?

 

Who knows what will grow when we plant a seed.

 

Clear skies!

RalphMeisterTigerMan


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#9 Gregory Gross

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 01:29 PM

Questar telescopes are a natural fit for public outreach and, more generally, education. I know that Lawrence Braymer marketed Questars specifically to educational institutions, among other audiences, from the very beginning.



#10 cbwerner

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 09:47 PM

Steve,

 

I've told this a few times here, but I got hooked on both astronomy and the Q when a middle school science teacher had us out to the school one night and let us look through his. That's a night that is forever burned into my mind's eye. Well done! applause.gif


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#11 justfred

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 03:31 PM

Outstanding! This is the other half of why we do this.

 

Thanks for sharing.

 

Fred



#12 Terra Nova

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 11:19 AM

I have been monitoring this thread for a while. After some thinking I have come to the conclusion that the Questar 3.5 is perhaps the best telescope for Community Outreach Astronomy in a class room setting. It's the perfect size and built (almost) like a tank, but I'm pretty sure that everyone like me who shares the night sky with others asks people not to touch the equipment.

 

Also, the Questar is a beautiful telescope, with its brushed aluminum and vibrant colours it is a scope that's hard to ignore. You are doing a valueable service by showing school kids about telescopes. Some may end up becoming amateurs themselves plus it gets them asking questions like: why can't we see the stars in the city like we can when we go camping or are visiting a National Park?

 

Who knows what will grow when we plant a seed.

 

Clear skies!

RalphMeisterTigerMan

My brother has around a dozen scopes, but he uses his Questar exclusively at his outreaches and school visits, (he’s his club’s outreach coordinator). Apparently he shares your same opinion of our little gems.


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#13 JamesMStephens

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 10:10 PM

A Questar is great for explaining how an equatorial mount and celestial coordinates work, and the way the RA circle is graduated in HMS and degrees (running the other way) allows you to compare Right Ascension and Sidereal Hour Angle.  Not that I'm obsessed with coordinate systems, mind you.

 

Jim


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