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Orion 10"dse help info

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#1 anaconda44

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 11:59 PM

hello i just picked up a orion dse 10iin dob for 100 bucks

overall condition is good. Mirrors are good also.

it had the foucuser replaced with a different one. He said he damaged the orig. So i bought a new 2in orion focuser for it. So the focal lenth us 1140mm and f.5.

he only gave me a 17mm eye piece and a collimator with the setup. Can anyone tell me what eye pieces to get for it. I here i should only probley need 3 or 4 differnt ones. 

also any other info on the dse would be helpful

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by anaconda44, 19 January 2020 - 12:23 AM.

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#2 Barlowbill

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 12:14 AM

Eye pieces are a large can of worms.  Big bucks vs middle of the line vs cheap.  I have used, cheap ones.  If I had to do my buying over again, I would be much more circumspect.  I  believe you should look at Explore Scientific eyepieces.  Everything (most of) what I have read on CN tells me that ES isa very good line of eps.  I only have a 2X Focal Extender but most folks really like the eps.  


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#3 bjulihn

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 02:31 AM

Hi There;

 

It would probably help if you could tell us what your experience level is with telescopes and what you are hoping to do with it. And do you have a starting budget for eyepieces? If this is your first scope and you are trying to decide if astronomy is for you, then more modest eyepieces may be the way to go. I started out with a 10 inch Dob and some plossl eyepieces from Televue. They were sharp but did not have a very widefield. Generally, the wider the field of view the more expensive the eyepiece because the design uses more elements. Also, the lower the power of the eyepiece, the larger the eyepiece tends to get and thus they are often more expensive.

 

Given that you only spent $100 on the scope it would be easy for a single eyepiece to cost more than your scope. I am currently using Astronomics "Paradigm" series eyepieces. They are $60 each new, and frequently found here on CN for $45 used. They are good basic eyepieces. 

 

If you are really asking the magnification question for a starter set of eyepieces, 17mm gives 67 X with your scope. I would consider that a lower-medium power eyepiece. I would consider starting with something around 8mm (140 X), a 32-35mm (35X), and a 2X Barlow. That would give you a range of 6 different magnifications. Generally, higher powers tend to work well on planets and lower powers will help you see fainter objects like Deep Sky Objects. The higher the magnification, the narrower the field of view. So, it is important to get a low power eyepiece early on with the widest possible field of view. I see you have a Telrad mounted, but when you are star hopping to find stuff, a low power widefield of view makes finding things sooooooo much easier.

 

Sorry if I am being too simplified with you. Others here can give you more specific help if you tell us a little more about your experience and situation.


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#4 macdonjh

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 07:37 AM

anaconda44,

 

Welcome to Cloudy Nights.  It looks like you got a good deal, congratulations.  If you're looking to "start slowly" with eye pieces Plossls are a good place to start.   Quality Plossls are inexpensive and will provide good views.  Another option is the AstroTech Paradigm.  I've never used one, but they get a lot of good press here on Cloudy Nights.

 

Stepping up from there, Explore Scientific eye pieces are also very popular here.  They have lots of choices with different fields of view.  The wider the field of view, in general, the more expensive the eye piece will be.  Baader Hyperion, Morpheus, Tele Vue are all other options at higher prices than Plossls.

 

As far as focal lengths, perhaps start simply: low, medium and high magnifications.  I'm not sure, but your picture makes your scope look like it's f/5, so 1250mm focal length.  A 32mm focal length eye piece will provide 1250mm/ 32mm = 40x magnification.  The 17mm that came with your scope: 74x.  An 8mm eye piece will provide 150x, and a 6mm approximately 200x.  Those would be good places to start.  Another option would be a zoom eye piece.  A higher initial cost than a single "fixed focal length" eye piece, but provides many different magnifications.

 

Overall, I'd recommend accumulating eye pieces slowly.  As Barlowbill said, they are a can of worms.  The more you observe and the more experience you get, the better you'll be able to gauge which eye pieces will provide the view you want.  

 

Oh, perhaps even before buying any eye pieces, spend some time to learn how to collimate your scope.  It doesn't matter what eye piece you use if your scope is out of collimation.  A simple laser collimator makes the process very simple, and you can learn the techniques of perfecting collimation (a laser doesn't get it perfect) as you go.


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#5 MJB87

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 08:01 AM

Moved to Reflectors forum...



#6 anaconda44

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 11:43 AM

Hi There;

 

It would probably help if you could tell us what your experience level is with telescopes and what you are hoping to do with it. And do you have a starting budget for eyepieces? If this is your first scope and you are trying to decide if astronomy is for you, then more modest eyepieces may be the way to go. I started out with a 10 inch Dob and some plossl eyepieces from Televue. They were sharp but did not have a very widefield. Generally, the wider the field of view the more expensive the eyepiece because the design uses more elements. Also, the lower the power of the eyepiece, the larger the eyepiece tends to get and thus they are often more expensive.

 

Given that you only spent $100 on the scope it would be easy for a single eyepiece to cost more than your scope. I am currently using Astronomics "Paradigm" series eyepieces. They are $60 each new, and frequently found here on CN for $45 used. They are good basic eyepieces. 

 

If you are really asking the magnification question for a starter set of eyepieces, 17mm gives 67 X with your scope. I would consider that a lower-medium power eyepiece. I would consider starting with something around 8mm (140 X), a 32-35mm (35X), and a 2X Barlow. That would give you a range of 6 different magnifications. Generally, higher powers tend to work well on planets and lower powers will help you see fainter objects like Deep Sky Objects. The higher the magnification, the narrower the field of view. So, it is important to get a low power eyepiece early on with the widest possible field of view. I see you have a Telrad mounted, but when you are star hopping to find stuff, a low power widefield of view makes finding things sooooooo much easier.

 

Sorry if I am being too simplified with you. Others here can give you more specific help if you tell us a little more about your experience and situation.

Yes first real tele.  bought it for planet viewing and learning the night sky. I hear with right eye pieces and good dark areas a few galaxies and nebula can be viewed but are faint and fuzzy dots.  I wanted a good size dob. but wasn't Shure about spending 700+ for first scope  so I don't have a problem spending some money on a few good eye pieces. just wondering about diam. and size . what 2in or regular size pieces should be good choices. I was told not to buy the eye piece  kits like celsetron   sells because I wont use all of them.? what size 2x Barlow would be good a 2in or regular size. or will a 3x Barlow work



#7 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 12:17 PM

Yes first real tele.  bought it for planet viewing and learning the night sky. I hear with right eye pieces and good dark areas a few galaxies and nebula can be viewed but are faint and fuzzy dots.  I wanted a good size dob. but wasn't Shure about spending 700+ for first scope  so I don't have a problem spending some money on a few good eye pieces. just wondering about diam. and size . what 2in or regular size pieces should be good choices. I was told not to buy the eye piece  kits like celsetron   sells because I wont use all of them.? what size 2x Barlow would be good a 2in or regular size. or will a 3x Barlow work

 

Anaconda: 

 

$100 for a 10 inch Orion DSE .  You did very well.  The Orion Deep Space Explorers were build by Discovery Telescopes and the mirrors were made by Terry Ostahowski.  The mirror is very likely better than what you would get with a new Orion.  

 

Eyepieces are always a question with a fast Dob like yours.  There's a lot to learn, a lot to know.  People like wide field eyepieces that are sharp across the field because the object stays in the field longer.  These eyepieces can be expensive, TeleVue has been the innovator for about 40 years and their eyepieces are very good but very expensive.  You don't even want to know how much they cost but one eyepiece like the Delite costs about $250 and it goes up from there.  I don't think you want to go there.  

 

There are a number of relatively inexpensive eyepieces that work reasonably well.  I do have a set of TeleVue eyepieces but I often use a second set that I call my lightweight set.  They're mostly $60 and under eyepieces.  I recently purchased the 12mm Paradigm from Cloudy Nights sponsor Astronomics and so far, I have been very pleased with it. It's a 60 degree eyepiece that cost $60... 

 

I should add, your scope can be a project scope, small mods, bigger mods.,  The optics are the base.  About 20 years ago, I bought a 12.5 inch DIscovery Dob and over the years, it has gone through a number of transformations, same optics.. 

 

Some of the stages:  As purchased:

6098607-Discovery Dob and PirateCN .jpg
 
A few years later:
1916767-Palomar Discovery.jpg
 
Today: 
JStar on EQ Platform 1.jpg

Jon


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#8 lakland5

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 12:27 PM

Welcome to Cloudy Nights, Anaconda!  You will find lots of experience here, shared freely...and lots of different viewpoints which can be hard to sort out.  Eyepiece selection and preference is always a topic with a lot of that kind of variation.

 

Like Jon, I have a 10" dob (XT10, the descendant of your scope).     My favorite targets to view are clusters, both open and globular, which are not as susceptible to light pollution washout as galaxies, even from the "darker" sites my club uses in the collar counties outside of Chicago.

 

I wear my eyeglasses at the scope (bad astigmatism) so I need long eye relief.  

 

Jon's suggestion of a 12mm Paradigm is spot on; you can't go wrong with that.   For a higher magnification, I sometimes use a Celestron X-Cel 7mm, but atmospheric conditions ("seeing," or turbulence, and "transparency," water vapor in the air) limit the times I go to even that level of magnification.  For a widest-field lower power EP, I use an Explore Scientific 24mm 68º which I bought used (I actually own two of them)....but I use a 25mm Plossl for outreach and provides really good views, with a low investment. Others will probably mention EPs I have not used, like the Meade HD-60 25mm.

 

Paradigms and Plossls are a good way to start for sure.

 

Happy viewing!

 

Ric A


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#9 Barlowbill

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 01:32 PM

Get a 2X Barlow.  I have a 3X but hardly ever use it.  Most folks who use Barlows use a 2X.  

One or two 2" eyepieces should suffice.  You should start figuring out Exit Pupil.  Just another thing to learn.  For instance, I have a 42mm, 2" eyepiece which in my 8" Dob provides 28.4 magnification.  The exit pupil is 7.1mm.  Being I am old as dirt, my eyes in all likelihood do not reach 7mm.  May be more like 5mm.  Which means I can't see all the light entering through that eyepiece.  But if I use my 35mm 2" eyepiece at 34 magnification I get 5.9mm exit pupil which is probably closer to what my tired old eyes can handle.  If you know what your eye can actually do you can pick your eyepieces more effectively.  Since most folks don't know, its a crap shoot.  But its all fun.  Good luck


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#10 macdonjh

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 02:22 PM

Yes first real tele.  bought it for planet viewing and learning the night sky. I hear with right eye pieces and good dark areas Dark sky definitely helps, what you can see from a light polluted location will look better, and what you can't see will be visible. 

 

a few galaxies and nebula can be viewed but are faint and fuzzy dots.  With a 10" telescope a lot more than "a few" galaxies and nebulae will be visible.  Do an internet search for "Messier objects" or "Messier list".  That will provide you with 110 objects of all the basic types to look for: galaxies, open clusters, globular clusters, nebulae, planetary nebulae.  Another thought is to get a cell phone app like Sky Safari which will help you locate these objects in the sky so you can look at them.

 

I wanted a good size dob. 10" is an excellent size for a scope.  Big enough it allows you to see LOTS of stuff, but not so big you can't transport it to dark sky or grumble about having to set it up at home to view.

 

but wasn't Shure about spending 700+ for first scope  Completely understandable.  If you decide you don't like astronomy, you'll be able to sell that scope pretty easily.  With the deal you got you might even have a future as an astronomy equipment broker.  If you do like astronomy, consider what Jon Isaacs said above.  Many would consider a 10" scope a "life time" scope, so you could modify and improve what you have over time.  As you can see from Jon Isaacs' photos he has hardly anything left of his original scope, but he made the changes over time, so the cost at each step was fairly small. 

 

so I don't have a problem spending some money on a few good eye pieces. Like women and shoes, we astronomers can never have too many eye pieces.

 

just wondering about diam. and size . Typical modern eye pieces come with 1-1/4" diameter and 2" diameter barrels.  You're starting to delve into the depths of eye piece discussions...  Perhaps cruise around the eye piece forum and read some old threads.  I think, to keep the information dump limited and focused, the other thing you'll be learning about soon is "apparent field of view, AFOV" and "true field of view, TFOV".  These are descriptions of the size of the piece of sky you can see through your telescope, and they are related.  When somebody, like Jon Isaacs or lakland5, talk about a "60 degree eye piece" or "the Explore Scientific 68", they are describing eye piece designs with a 60o and 68o apparent fields of view, respectively.  More AFOV costs more money (generally).

 

what 2in or regular size pieces should be good choices. I still recommend you take it slowly with eye pieces.  There will always be eye pieces to buy, so you don't have to rush.  Rushing will result in your buying eye pieces you don't like.  Not that there's anything wrong with that, it all adds to experience.  But taking it slow will maximize your experience and minimize the money you spend. 

 

I was told not to buy the eye piece  kits like celsetron  sells because I wont use all of them.? I generally agree with this...

 

what size 2x Barlow would be good a 2in or regular size. or will a 3x Barlow work  A Barlow will work with your scope.  A Barlow extends the focal length of your telescope, to the effect that an eye piece used with a Barlow gives more magnification that that same eye piece by itself.  One reason to use a Barlow is to make one or more eye pieces provide two different magnifications.  For example, that 17mm eye piece you have gives 74x in your scope.  If you use it with a 2x Barlow, it will give 148x.  Another reason to use a Barlow is you can use longer focal length eye pieces, which generally have more eye relief (I'll leave it to you to look that one up) and get higher magnification while still having long eye relief.  Barlows can also make the view around the outer edge of some eye pieces look sharper.  All that aside, I still don't use Barlows, but that's me.  Again, I'll recommend low, medium and high power eye pieces to start (so really, only two more than the 17mm you have) and then collect more later.

 

Collimation...

anaconda44, comments in red above.


Edited by macdonjh, 19 January 2020 - 02:25 PM.

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#11 macdonjh

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 02:30 PM

I just looked closely at the photo posted, it looks like that 10" DSE has a 1-1/4" focuser, so 2" eye pieces won't fit in the focuser.  Not to worry, it's possible to makes changes...

 

I think there would be two modifications necessary, though.  One is the focuser itself.  Lots of options there.  The other, though, would be to change the secondary mirror to illuminate the field stop of a 2" eye piece.  Jon Isaacs probably has done the math to know if this is necessary to get the full benefit of a 2" focuser and eye pieces.



#12 mfoose

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 02:54 PM

For $100, you got a great deal! I’ll echo what Jon said about the Orion DSE history because it is important. The telescope was made by a telescope company named Discovery. Orion Dobsonians nowadays are sourced from a Chinese company with optics made in China. They have gotten very good at the process, but the optician Terry Ostahowski was with Discovery during the time your 10” Orion DSE was made. Terry is a premium optician so the mirrors in your scope are probably great. Hard to get better.

If this is your first major telescope then I would suggest a few cost effective options that can easily be built upon as you gain experience. I suggest a 8-24mm zoom eyepiece and a 32mm Plossl eyepiece. With these two purchases, you would have most of the magnifications needed. Maybe a 2.5x Barlow as well to increase magnification on nights when the atmosphere is steady. A simple 8-24mm zoom isn’t going to show you the best image, but it will teach you what magnifications you prefer. This then allows you to search for eyepieces that fill those voids down the road. You could spend many nights reading through the forums on what eyepieces to buy, but that will keep you from observing.

I also noticed that you do not have a finder that provides any kind of magnification. For the 10” DSE, a 50mm RACI (right angle correct image) finder will help you find DSOs (deep sky objects). You already have a Telrad, which is great, but if you are in an area with dark skies then you will struggle to find faint objects. A Telrad and a 50mm RACI finder are a fantastic combo for finding objects. The Telrad gets you easily in the neighborhood and the 50mm RACI allows you have a closer look so you can center the object.

I’d also recommend some astronomy litterateur. A guide book like “Turn Left at Orion” or “Noghtwatch” can teach you a lot. If you also have a pair of binoculars laying around, bring those out as well.

Until you decide on how to proceed, do your best to collimate the scope and use that 17mm eyepiece. You will be able to see a lot with what you already have.

Clear skies,

Michael
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#13 anaconda44

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 03:51 PM

Anaconda: 

 

$100 for a 10 inch Orion DSE .  You did very well.  The Orion Deep Space Explorers were build by Discovery Telescopes and the mirrors were made by Terry Ostahowski.  The mirror is very likely better than what you would get with a new Orion.  

 

Eyepieces are always a question with a fast Dob like yours.  There's a lot to learn, a lot to know.  People like wide field eyepieces that are sharp across the field because the object stays in the field longer.  These eyepieces can be expensive, TeleVue has been the innovator for about 40 years and their eyepieces are very good but very expensive.  You don't even want to know how much they cost but one eyepiece like the Delite costs about $250 and it goes up from there.  I don't think you want to go there.  

 

There are a number of relatively inexpensive eyepieces that work reasonably well.  I do have a set of TeleVue eyepieces but I often use a second set that I call my lightweight set.  They're mostly $60 and under eyepieces.  I recently purchased the 12mm Paradigm from Cloudy Nights sponsor Astronomics and so far, I have been very pleased with it. It's a 60 degree eyepiece that cost $60... 

 

I should add, your scope can be a project scope, small mods, bigger mods.,  The optics are the base.  About 20 years ago, I bought a 12.5 inch DIscovery Dob and over the years, it has gone through a number of transformations, same optics.. 

 

Some of the stages:  As purchased:

 
 
A few years later:
 
 
Today: 
 

Jon

thanks hopefully you can hep me as I move along.

I did find old instructions online what gives me some worry is collimation of the secondary mirror. it has the 4 spider vanes and a nut on the top. what's the best way to go about it.?  the mirrors look real good I don't think it was used much kept indoors. theirs a little dust but not bad. how do you remove the big mirror to clean.? I did looked thought it when I picked it up it did look real good. also do you have any idea how old mine might be.

thanks



#14 anaconda44

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 04:03 PM

I just looked closely at the photo posted, it looks like that 10" DSE has a 1-1/4" focuser, so 2" eye pieces won't fit in the focuser.  Not to worry, it's possible to makes changes...

 

I think there would be two modifications necessary, though.  One is the focuser itself.  Lots of options there.  The other, though, would be to change the secondary mirror to illuminate the field stop of a 2" eye piece.  Jon Isaacs probably has done the math to know if this is necessary to get the full benefit of a 2" focuser and eye pieces.

 

yes it does its not the original one. it had a bigger one be he damaged it I ordered a 2in focuser like the one he had on it before to try. but I know I will have  to set every thing up again.



#15 anaconda44

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 04:06 PM

anaconda44, comments in red above.

Thank you very much I really appreciate  the help and the Humer


Edited by anaconda44, 19 January 2020 - 04:09 PM.


#16 anaconda44

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 04:08 PM

I want to thank everyone who has responded to my post so far I really appreciate the help and tips  


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#17 bjulihn

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 06:54 PM

Hi Anaconda44;

 

Just wanted to echo mfoose's suggestion of a guide book. "Nightwatch" by Terence Dickenson was a game changer for me in learning the night sky. His simple system of using your hand or fingers extended to arm's length to roughly measure angular distance of the sky, enabled me to recognize stars and constellations quickly and to know I was in the right area when looking for objects without "GOTO" assistance. He took the mystery out of what seemed overwhelmingly complex! 

 

Brad J.



#18 aatt

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 08:36 PM

I third the Nightwatch rec. that is the book I cut my astronomy teeth on. It is an invaluable resource for someone who is just starting out. As a veteran I have looked at my old copy and still find stuff in it. Congrats on getting a scope of likely premium quality optically for$100. Fantastic deal! A 32, 17 and 10 plossl with a Barlow will be a very good starter set that will not break the bank and allow you to get some experience. After awhile you find the limitations of those eyepieces and decide what your priorities will be. I know I took awhile to find my ideal eyepieces for various applications.

#19 jhbanister

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 09:32 PM

>hello i just picked up a orion dse 10iin dob for 100 bucks
overall condition is good. Mirrors are good also.
it had the foucuser replaced with a different one. He said he damaged the orig. So i bought a new 2in orion focuser for it. So the focal lenth us 1140mm and f.5.
he only gave me a 17mm eye piece and a collimator with the setup. Can anyone tell me what eye pieces to get for it. I here i should only probley need 3 or 4 differnt ones.
also any other info on the dse would be helpful>
 

I observed for many years with a 10” f5 newt.  For planetary you need something around 250x.  120x works well for smaller DSO,s.  50x for larger items. So, an ES 24/68 and a good 2x Barlow should get you started.  You would have 48x, 70x, 96x, and 192x.  If your local seeing conditions allow, a 10mm would give you 117x and 234x.  I like the Pentax XW 10mm, but its a bit pricy.  The Morpheus 9mm is a a good bet for $100 less.



#20 SeattleScott

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 11:22 PM

I just looked closely at the photo posted, it looks like that 10" DSE has a 1-1/4" focuser, so 2" eye pieces won't fit in the focuser. Not to worry, it's possible to makes changes...

I think there would be two modifications necessary, though. One is the focuser itself. Lots of options there. The other, though, would be to change the secondary mirror to illuminate the field stop of a 2" eye piece. Jon Isaacs probably has done the math to know if this is necessary to get the full benefit of a 2" focuser and eye pieces.

You can tell it is a 1.25” focuser based on that picture? Geez my phone display must suck.

If it is 1.25” I would roll with that for now. Make sure you have legit interest before embarking on transforming your scope. If it is 2”, all the better. Let us know though because it impacts what we recommend for a low power eyepiece.

A barlow is nice starting out to help fill in focal lengths. Eventually the idea is to get more fixed eyepieces, and save the barlow for hitting maximum power on nights of great seeing. You may not want to spend $250 on an eyepiece you can only use a few times a year. That’s where a barlow comes in, long term. In the short run you will use it more regularly since you don’t have many fixed eyepieces yet. 2x or 3x can work, just depends on how they fit with your lineup, which you don’t have right now, so pick either one.

Clearly you don’t have a problem buying used so shop the classifieds! You can get considerable discounts. For example, if you really do have a 1.25” focuser, then a good approach would be a 32mm Plossl. I have one I bought for $45 new. Ended up getting a second one with a scope purchase, so I recently tried to sell one here for around $25, and it didn’t sell. Maybe $23 would have done it; half the price of new. The $60 paradigms go for $40-45. Meade HD-60 or Celestron Xcel LX typically go for around $50, maybe $55. So maybe you save $20 an eyepiece on these entry level to mid tier eyepieces. More savings on the $100-250 eyepieces. And of course you can get a used barlow too. I just sold a couple here, have a couple more to sell eventually.

Don’t forget a collimation tool! Spending good money on excellent eyepieces is a waste if you don’t collimate!

Scott
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#21 anaconda44

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 04:47 PM

You can tell it is a 1.25” focuser based on that picture? Geez my phone display must suck.

If it is 1.25” I would roll with that for now. Make sure you have legit interest before embarking on transforming your scope. If it is 2”, all the better. Let us know though because it impacts what we recommend for a low power eyepiece.

A barlow is nice starting out to help fill in focal lengths. Eventually the idea is to get more fixed eyepieces, and save the barlow for hitting maximum power on nights of great seeing. You may not want to spend $250 on an eyepiece you can only use a few times a year. That’s where a barlow comes in, long term. In the short run you will use it more regularly since you don’t have many fixed eyepieces yet. 2x or 3x can work, just depends on how they fit with your lineup, which you don’t have right now, so pick either one.

Clearly you don’t have a problem buying used so shop the classifieds! You can get considerable discounts. For example, if you really do have a 1.25” focuser, then a good approach would be a 32mm Plossl. I have one I bought for $45 new. Ended up getting a second one with a scope purchase, so I recently tried to sell one here for around $25, and it didn’t sell. Maybe $23 would have done it; half the price of new. The $60 paradigms go for $40-45. Meade HD-60 or Celestron Xcel LX typically go for around $50, maybe $55. So maybe you save $20 an eyepiece on these entry level to mid tier eyepieces. More savings on the $100-250 eyepieces. And of course you can get a used barlow too. I just sold a couple here, have a couple more to sell eventually.

Don’t forget a collimation tool! Spending good money on excellent eyepieces is a waste if you don’t collimate!

Scott

yes it does have a 1.25 focuser I wanted to make it 2in I have a 2in focuser but don't know how to mod it. would have to find a person who knows how to do it and set it back up. what brand is your 32mm eye piece that you were sellin.?

thanks


Edited by anaconda44, 20 January 2020 - 04:49 PM.


#22 droid

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 01:08 PM

On the other hand, there are a lot good eyepieces that are 1.25, that will rock that scope. 

 

Orion stratus or the baeder hyperions. Come to mind, but there are others.


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#23 anaconda44

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 04:22 PM

Any ideas on straps setup or handles to lift my dse 10in got to be a better way than bear hugging it. if you have some pics or links I would be grateful 

thanks


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#24 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 04:30 PM

Any ideas on straps setup or handles to lift my dse 10in got to be a better way than bear hugging it. if you have some pics or links I would be grateful 

thanks

 

It's not what you call pretty or aesthetically stunning but my 12.5 Discovery came with some garage door handles bolted to the OTA.. \

 

190089-jonisaacs.jpg
 
Jon

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