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Orion Nebula - Trapezium cluster burned

astrophotography dslr imaging
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#1 Aries-Lux

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 06:43 AM

Hi Astropic experts,

 

Here is one of my few first astro photos taken with a SW Esprit 150ED F/7

Specs of this pic are :

> camera : Canon D6 astromod

> lights : 20 x 120' (@ iso 1600)

> darks : 11

> offsets : 11

> no flats (had no time...)

> processing : DSS 3.3.6 & Ligtroom CC

 

Question : despite a reduction of high lights (under LR) to 0 the trapezium area remains burned. How can I solve this ?

 

Any other comment or suggestions are more than welcome!

 

Tx & clear skies

 

M42 Orion Nubula.jpg

 


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#2 BQ Octantis

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 06:52 AM

Question : despite a reduction of high lights (under LR) to 0 the trapezium area remains burned. How can I solve this ?

Trapezium burns at 5-10 seconds at ISO1600. So take a few shots (~10) at 1-2 seconds and a few at 10, stack them separately, and then feather them in with a layer mask in Photoshop. Works like a champ:

 

M42 & Surrounds

 

BQ


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#3 Gucky

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 06:54 AM

Use HDR technique. You can read about the process here.

 

I don't know if Lightroom's HDR combination is able to create a good result. Probably you will have to use Photoshop (as BQ Octantis suggests) or maybe it's time for you to have a look at PixInsight.


Edited by Gucky, 19 January 2020 - 07:25 AM.

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#4 kathyastro

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 08:31 AM

There's nothing you can do in processing after the fact.  You have to have the data to begin with.  Hence the 1-2 second exposures mentioned above.

 

If you don't want to get fancy, learning HDR and layer masks right away, it does actually work to just throw all your exposures from 1 second to 120 seconds into the stack.  Of course, you'll get better results with the proper techniques, but that will get you started.  You have to have the data, though.


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#5 Aries-Lux

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 12:39 PM

Dear BQ, Gucky and Kathy,

Thanks for your answers and precious comments.

Sounds like logic, if lights are burned to death one can't make them live again...

So will start with going to shorter exposures (< 5 sec.), and make different light bundles at various (gradually) longer exposure times.

I can maybe also let the ISO vary ? Will experience further...

Had in fact the same problem with Andromeda galaxy (core completely burned)...

Many tx & clear skies

 

 



#6 sunnyday

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 12:40 PM

nice pic



#7 sabersix

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 02:49 PM

How do we learn HDR that everyone speaks of?



#8 Gucky

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 06:02 PM

How do we learn HDR that everyone speaks of?

You could start with looking up the general concept at Wikipedia.

There are several excellent pages about HDR on dpreview.



#9 Simon D.

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 08:35 PM

There's nothing you can do in processing after the fact.  You have to have the data to begin with.  Hence the 1-2 second exposures mentioned above.

 

If you don't want to get fancy, learning HDR and layer masks right away, it does actually work to just throw all your exposures from 1 second to 120 seconds into the stack.  Of course, you'll get better results with the proper techniques, but that will get you started.  You have to have the data, though.

Kathy, can Deep Sky Stacker handle that process of varying bright and darker exposure in one stacking operation?  I do know how to use masks in Photoshop to merge the two exposures...just wondering if there’s ans easier process. Thx



#10 kathyastro

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 08:52 PM

Kathy, can Deep Sky Stacker handle that process of varying bright and darker exposure in one stacking operation?  I do know how to use masks in Photoshop to merge the two exposures...just wondering if there’s ans easier process. Thx

That I don't know.  When I did my M42, I used PixInsight.  It had no trouble figuring out which darks belonged with which lights, etc. 

 

I think DSS might require you to separate them by exposure time.  So you'd still need to stack the various stacks.  It's been a long time since I used DSS and I never did anything fancy with it, so you may need to talk to someone more current with it.

 

The theory behind just stacking everything in one stack was that the short exposures would provide contrast between the Trapezium stars and their bright background, pulling down the average brightness of the background from what it would have been with just the long exposures.  It worked for me.



#11 17.5Dob

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 10:57 PM

Hi Astropic experts,


Specs of this pic are :


> processing : DSS 3.3.6

 

You do know that DSS is now 64 bit and DSS 4.2.3



#12 Aries-Lux

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Posted 20 January 2020 - 12:52 AM

Hi Dave,

tx for this hint. Checked DSS site, and indeed latest version is 4.2.3 and above all I see my Canon’s D6 rawfiles (.CRE) are supported. So I suppose no conversion to .DNG anymore needed....

Will update asap.

Clear skies!

 



#13 taranpreet

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 01:43 AM

Took this image some days ago and had the core blown out. I took 4 x 200 sec. shots. Using photoshop I tried getting as much details as possible.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Screenshot_20200122-174500_Instagram.jpg

Edited by taranpreet, 22 January 2020 - 01:45 AM.

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#14 calypsob

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 03:45 AM

The 6d may have preserved the data, the trick is streching the nebula without clipping. How was your image before you stretched? Was trapezium visible?


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