Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

First Night out with new scope

  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#1 Tusck

Tusck

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Philadelphia, PA

Posted 21 January 2020 - 05:47 AM

Hey all, checking back in after my initial post here.  I spent a lot of time considering the advice that I received and advice given to other people posting similar first posts, and finally bought a Skywatcher evostar 100mm apo on astromart from a really nice guy in my area.  I got a good deal on it and a mount, so I'm very happy.  The reason I went with this over a Dobsonian, which was the most recommended, is that I kept reading advice to choose the telescope that you see in your mind as what a telescope should be and you'll enjoy it more.  When I was a kid I had a refractor so it's just the way I view telescopes and my gut just said that I'll enjoy it more with a scope that I understand.  As a bonus, the guy I bought it from was a memeber of the local astronomy group so that was nice to already meet someone that is active in the community.  

 

I've been very excited to get out there for my first time, but my story starts the way a lot of people's do, I immediately got sick and it's been cloudy for 2 weeks.  Fast forward to last night, I went outside, set everything up, used the finder to look for Orion, got really excited and looked through the telescope for the first time.  I couldn't see anything.  Ok, after 30 minutes of fiddling with the focuser, getting worried this thing was broken, getting my phone out to look something up that didn't help, I finally figured out that the focuser was "pulled in" all the way so I just had to turn the knobs the other way for a bit until I started getting movement.  Ok, line up my shot again, using the 25 mm EP, and holy **** there was the Orion Nubula.  It's literally the only thing I knew how to find right away, and even though I had tempered my expectation that it was not going to look like the pictures, especially in a 7 Bortle sky, it was truly amazing.  So I practiced a bit with the micro-adjusters to look around and follow things.  I looked for Andromeda, couldn't find it, then looked for Pleidies (SP), couldn't find it.  I tried out the 8mm EP that came with it, couldn't see anything.   All in all, it was a great first night of learning my telescope, seeing something that got me excited for the next time out, and showed me I have a lot to learn, which just makes a new hobby like this fun.  

 

So my to-do list:

1. Need to look into ways to learn the sky more, get a map, etc.

2. Need to figure out how to use eye pieces effectively and which ones I might need to enhance my viewing\

3. Need to find a place I can go to at least get to a Bortle 5 sky

 

Anyway, just wanted to share my first story, appreciate all the advice I've recived and that I read.  This is a great community.  


  • Greyhaven, Starman27, brentknight and 7 others like this

#2 desertstars

desertstars

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 44,998
  • Joined: 05 Nov 2003
  • Loc: Tucson, AZ

Posted 21 January 2020 - 07:44 AM

Possibly the best news in your entire post is the bit about connecting with a local astronomy club in the process of making that purchase. This forum is, indeed, a great community, but the chance to join a group and observe with experienced amateurs is not to be passed up. First group star party you can attend, go for it.When you're  getting started, there's nothing quite like having live bodies around who can step over and say, "Look, here's one way to do ----- ."

 

One thought/question occurs: how did you align the finder before setting your sights on that first object? Many of us find doing so in daylight, on a stationary object, more effective than aligning it on stars and such after dark.

 

The Great Nebula in Orion. You surely can't go wrong with that for a First Light object!

 

As for learning the sky, I'd suggest obtaining a planisphere, a copy of Turn Left At Orion by Guy Consolmagno & Dan Davis, and the Sky & Telescope's Pocket Sky Atlas (I prefer the so-called "Jumbo Edition.")

 

Clear, dark skies, and keep looking up! waytogo.gif


  • tog and brentknight like this

#3 JOEinCO

JOEinCO

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 761
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Colorado Front Range

Posted 21 January 2020 - 07:46 AM

You're gonna have fun now!! waytogo.gif 

 

Addressing your questions: 

 

1) For a simple, overall look at the sky, I am a fan of a simple ol' copy of Wil Tirion's "Cambridge Star Atlas". The 2nd Edition is just fine. When you add a more "advanced" star atlas like the S&T Jumbo Pocket Star Atlas, this one will still serve you well as a binocular atlas or a backup to keep in your car. Five and a half bucks....can't go wrong!

https://www.ebay.com...OAAAOSw-o1bb08J

 

2) Take it slow. You don't need a ton of eyepieces. Tell us what eyepieces you have already, and how much YOU would like to spend in total on your eyepiece kit. 

 

3) Where are you located? You can add this info to your profile and it will post under your name each time.



#4 JOEinCO

JOEinCO

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 761
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Colorado Front Range

Posted 21 January 2020 - 07:49 AM

Thomas' suggestions are great. Following his post....

 

I have an older copy of Turn Left At Orion that you can have for the price of postage. The older editions are really only different in regards to the planet information, and you'll find plenty of info on the planets' locations online, here, or in Sky & Telescope magazine. Send me a private message if you want the book.


  • clearwaterdave likes this

#5 Tusck

Tusck

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Philadelphia, PA

Posted 21 January 2020 - 08:23 AM

Possibly the best news in your entire post is the bit about connecting with a local astronomy club in the process of making that purchase. This forum is, indeed, a great community, but the chance to join a group and observe with experienced amateurs is not to be passed up. First group star party you can attend, go for it.When you're getting started, there's nothing quite like having live bodies around who can step over and say, "Look, here's one way to do ----- ."

One thought/question occurs: how did you align the finder before setting your sights on that first object? Many of us find doing so in daylight, on a stationary object, more effective than aligning it on stars and such after dark.

The Great Nebula in Orion. You surely can't go wrong with that for a First Light object!

As for learning the sky, I'd suggest obtaining a planisphere, a copy of Turn Left At Orion by Guy Consolmagno & Dan Davis, and the Sky & Telescope's Pocket Sky Atlas (I prefer the so-called "Jumbo Edition.")

Clear, dark skies, and keep looking up! waytogo.gif


I definitely plan to start attending to help me learn further.

The finder was already aligned, the previous owner had aligned it, and showed me when I purchased it.

Thanks for the suggestions on tools to learn the sky's, I'll look into those.
  • desertstars and Oyster74 like this

#6 Tusck

Tusck

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Philadelphia, PA

Posted 21 January 2020 - 08:27 AM

You're gonna have fun now!! waytogo.gif

Addressing your questions:

1) For a simple, overall look at the sky, I am a fan of a simple ol' copy of Wil Tirion's "Cambridge Star Atlas". The 2nd Edition is just fine. When you add a more "advanced" star atlas like the S&T Jumbo Pocket Star Atlas, this one will still serve you well as a binocular atlas or a backup to keep in your car. Five and a half bucks....can't go wrong!
https://www.ebay.com...OAAAOSw-o1bb08J

2) Take it slow. You don't need a ton of eyepieces. Tell us what eyepieces you have already, and how much YOU would like to spend in total on your eyepiece kit.

3) Where are you located? You can add this info to your profile and it will post under your name each time.


Thanks for the suggestions, I'll look into them.

As for the eyepieces, I hear you. I don't want to buy anything now because I don't know enough about what I want. I need to learn more about the lingo, what pieces are used for and when, etc. Then I can make some I formed decisions. Hell, I couldn't even see more than blurry stars in the 8mm so I was doing something wrong.

Good suggestion, I'll update my profile. I'm outside of Philly, so light pollution is an issue I have to work through.

#7 Beeham

Beeham

    Explorer 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 67
  • Joined: 08 Nov 2019
  • Loc: Oakland County, Michigan

Posted 21 January 2020 - 08:33 AM

A couple more suggestions: check out Stellarium, both the downloadable and online versions, I have found they are great for learning the sky. Also, I live in a Bortle 7 area myself, and find that star-hopping doesn't really work with so few visible stars, so I tend to use a manual azimuth degree ring and a digital angle-finder (along with the real-time alt-az coordinates I get from stellarium on my laptop) to find stuff, and it works really well. Observing in a Bortle 7 zone without goto is tough, but totally feasible once you get the hang of it. Good luck!
  • Greyhaven, Olhado, vtornado and 1 other like this

#8 DLuders

DLuders

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,414
  • Joined: 10 Apr 2017
  • Loc: Spokane, WA

Posted 21 January 2020 - 08:34 AM

Yes, consider downloading the free Planetarium program called Stellarium onto your computer, set it to your location, load your telescope and eyepiece in the "Oculars" section, and plan your next observing session!   smile.gif


Edited by DLuders, 21 January 2020 - 08:35 AM.

  • Greyhaven likes this

#9 JoshUrban

JoshUrban

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 114
  • Joined: 22 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Indian Head, MD

Posted 21 January 2020 - 08:42 AM

Hey there, and CONGRATS!

 

  That's super cool - and should be an awesome scope for years and years.  As a matter of fact, a great book sits on my shelf that was written by a guy using that size refractor exclusively for his observations - Stephen James O'Mera's "The Messier Objects."  I've got a 4" refractor, too, and it rocks!  

 

  A few questions for you:  1. Do you only have an 8mm eyepiece?  If so, even when you find the Pleiades, Andromeda galaxy, etc, you'll be so zoomed in you won't really be able to see them. That's moderately high power, and definitely makes finding things a bit trickier.   2. Do you have a 2" diagonal with this, or is it the 1.25"?  Either way is cool, just a good thing to keep in mind when shopping for extra eyepieces.  A nice 25-30mm eyepiece will give you beautiful low-power widefield views here.   Good news:  there's choices ranging from $30 on up, with plenty of cool stuff on the classifieds here.  (I saw a Vixen 30mm for $150 and a 13mm Nagler for under that today!)  

 

  Have a blast...what a great scope you've got there!!



#10 MikeTahtib

MikeTahtib

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 858
  • Joined: 10 Oct 2016

Posted 21 January 2020 - 09:25 AM

I also highly recommend the Cambridge Star Atlas.  It has enough detail to keep you busy for a long time, but the charts are zoomed out enough to allow you to see big sections fo sky, to learn your way around and identify constellations.  I really only use the charts at the back of the book, but they alone are worth it.  THe other charts are helpful, and you might like them also.

As another poster mentioned, aligning the finder scope to the main telescope is very important.  If they are pointing in different directions, it won't point the telescope at the thing you are sighting.  It is best to take the telescope out while ti is still light, point it at a distant tree or cell tower, then move the telescope around until it is visible in the main telescope. Then look through the finder and see if ti is looking at the same thing.  If not, there are adjusting screws somewhere on it to align it.  It seems reasonable to think you could just point the tube at somethig in the night sky. move it around a bit and find the object, but it doesn't work that way.  It's amazing how big the sky is compared to the tiny little part you see through the eyepiece. Even with a properly aligned finderscope, and good knowledge of the sky, it can be very challenging to find soem objects.  But when you do, it is a real thrill!!!  That's one fo my favorite aspects of this hobby, finding things with just a paper map and finderscope.  Other people enjoy different aspects, You wil figure out what you like best with experience.  My best advice is to not rush, go at your own pace, and don't feel like you have to do everything right away.  Enjoy the journey, from first steps through.



#11 rhetfield

rhetfield

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 225
  • Joined: 14 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Suburban Chicago, IL, USA

Posted 21 January 2020 - 09:45 AM

I live in bortle 7 skies.  If you can see orion's sword with the naked eye, you can also see pleade's with the naked eye.  Both look like smudges.  Pleade's will be almost directly overhead in the 9PM'ish hour - maybe a little to the west.  Binoculars might help with it.

 

In bortle 7 skies, all you will see of Andromeda is a small faint ball of fluff that represents the bright center of the galaxy.  If I remember right, it is a bit to the west of Pleade's.  You will not likely see it in your finder scope.  In a dark area, you might see it with naked eye and binoculars.

 

As others have noted, you will want to consider the degree circle method of guiding so that you can find things.  Lots of open clusters and double stars to be seen in your skies - but much of it will not be visible in your finder scope.

 

The other thing to consider is a wide field eyepiece in 2" (2" always has wider field of vie than 1.25").  Something like the explore scientific 2" 30mm, 82 degree would get you close to 3 degree field of view.  You need that to see the entirety of Pleade's or dark sky Andromeda.  Having almost 3 degree field of view will also make it so very much easier to find things.  Others might be able to suggest some similar eyepieces that are cheaper than the explore scientific.

 

Next steps after the wide field eyepiece would be a barlow (probably 1.25") - you would turn the 25 into a 12.5mm, and maybe something in the 1.25" 16mm range (it will barlow down to 8 mm).  This will fill in the high magnification ranges.  Your 5mm is about as high magnification as you will want to go with that scope. 

 

Finally, you might want to look into a UHC nebula filter.  These allow things like Orion, ring nebula, and dumbell nebula to pop out more.  You will be able to see those in bortle 7 skies - though they can be difficult to find. 



#12 Starman27

Starman27

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 8,370
  • Joined: 29 Jan 2006
  • Loc: Illinois, Iowa

Posted 21 January 2020 - 11:03 AM

Thanks for your first light report. You are definitely on the road to more wonder filled nights ahead.



#13 desertstars

desertstars

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 44,998
  • Joined: 05 Nov 2003
  • Loc: Tucson, AZ

Posted 21 January 2020 - 01:18 PM

The finder was already aligned, the previous owner had aligned it, and showed me when I purchased it.

I always double-check my finder alignment, especially if I've needed to remove the finder for storage. It usually needs to be touched up a bit.


  • sunnyday likes this

#14 banjaxed

banjaxed

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 33
  • Joined: 06 Nov 2019
  • Loc: NW England

Posted 21 January 2020 - 02:38 PM

Glad you are enjoying your journey into this fascinating hobby, you also learn how to be patient  


Edited by banjaxed, 21 January 2020 - 02:38 PM.


#15 Olhado

Olhado

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 81
  • Joined: 22 Jun 2005

Posted 21 January 2020 - 02:40 PM

A couple more suggestions: check out Stellarium, both the downloadable and online versions, I have found they are great for learning the sky. Also, I live in a Bortle 7 area myself, and find that star-hopping doesn't really work with so few visible stars, so I tend to use a manual azimuth degree ring and a digital angle-finder (along with the real-time alt-az coordinates I get from stellarium on my laptop) to find stuff, and it works really well. Observing in a Bortle 7 zone without goto is tough, but totally feasible once you get the hang of it. Good luck!


Where does one get the degree ring/angle finder? I am in bortle 8(!) skies, and sounds like it could be a useful addition.

#16 vtornado

vtornado

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,497
  • Joined: 22 Jan 2016
  • Loc: Northern Illinois

Posted 21 January 2020 - 02:52 PM

Hi, I'm so glad you had a good night out.

 

What kind of mount do you have?

If it is alt-az, one thing that will  help you is a digital angle meter you can get off of amazon or at a hardware store.

And download stellarium or sky-safari to a tablet or cell phone.

 

sky-safari will give you real time coordinates of any object in the sky.

Level your tripod.

With the angle meter, you can hold it momentarily on your scope's tube, and get the elevation set correctly for what sky-safari says.  Then you just have to pan left-to-right.   Having one dimension limited is a big help in finding items, especially in light pollution.

 

I live in a red zone, and do this when I am looking for a new object that I don't know how to find.

Also it helps to get that first object in your scope to zero in your finder.


Edited by vtornado, 21 January 2020 - 02:53 PM.


#17 rhetfield

rhetfield

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 225
  • Joined: 14 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Suburban Chicago, IL, USA

Posted 21 January 2020 - 03:18 PM

Where does one get the degree ring/angle finder? I am in bortle 8(!) skies, and sounds like it could be a useful addition.

The website below will allow you to create a degree circle in whatever size you want.  You need the full 360 for azimuth and 90 degrees for altitude.  PAy close attention to the direction of each scale so that the scope reads the right direction to what it is pointed at.

 

https://www.blocklay...dividereng.aspx

 

Something like this can also be used for altitude.  The magnetic base is good for attaching it to the tube.

 

https://www.amazon.c...788151006&psc=1



#18 vtornado

vtornado

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,497
  • Joined: 22 Jan 2016
  • Loc: Northern Illinois

Posted 21 January 2020 - 03:22 PM

The website below will allow you to create a degree circle in whatever size you want.  You need the full 360 for azimuth and 90 degrees for altitude.  PAy close attention to the direction of each scale so that the scope reads the right direction to what it is pointed at.

 

https://www.blocklay...dividereng.aspx

 

Something like this can also be used for altitude.  The magnetic base is good for attaching it to the tube.

 

https://www.amazon.c...788151006&psc=1

Mr. rhetfield, I think this user does not have a dob.  Although the principles are the same, making a

degree circle is trickier, and magnetic angle meters don't stick to aluminum tubes, but they can be held briefly

to get a reading.


Edited by vtornado, 21 January 2020 - 03:23 PM.


#19 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 87,746
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 21 January 2020 - 04:48 PM

You may find some of the information in my post (#22) at https://www.cloudyni...mers/?p=5184287 useful. 



#20 Sky Muse

Sky Muse

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7,324
  • Joined: 26 Oct 2012
  • Loc: Mid-South, U.S.

Posted 22 January 2020 - 01:04 PM

Thanks for the suggestions, I'll look into them.

As for the eyepieces, I hear you. I don't want to buy anything now because I don't know enough about what I want. I need to learn more about the lingo, what pieces are used for and when, etc. Then I can make some I formed decisions. Hell, I couldn't even see more than blurry stars in the 8mm so I was doing something wrong.

Good suggestion, I'll update my profile. I'm outside of Philly, so light pollution is an issue I have to work through.

You might wish to consider a zoom-ocular.  This is my own, at left, a Meade 8mm-24mm, and compared to a 32mm Plossl.  A 32mm Plossl is generally the largest eyepiece, for the lowest power and widest view of the sky, in the 1.25" format...

 

Meade MZT8-24 - comparison2b.jpg

 

A zoom-ocular serves two purposes.  One is as a teaching-tool, in enabling you to pick out which mm-eyepiece, the magnification, at which you like to observe best, and the most.  Let's say, with the zoom, you find yourself using the 12mm setting a lot, then you might wish to get a dedicated, wide-angle 12mm eyepiece.  If you find that you also like to observe at the 16mm setting, well, you get the idea.

 

Secondly, a zoom-ocular offers convenience.  For quick, impromptu observing sessions, instead of carrying a box of eyepieces out to the observing site, just grab the zoom and away you go.  Many, I'm sure, like to simply zoom back and forth, from one power to the next, when viewing a single object.

 

Zoom-oculars come at different price-points.  You do get what you pay for, but at times you get more than you expected, and when choosing an economical brand and model.  I feel that I got my money's worth with that Meade.


Edited by Sky Muse, 22 January 2020 - 01:06 PM.


#21 Tusck

Tusck

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Philadelphia, PA

Posted 29 January 2020 - 07:35 PM

Yes, consider downloading the free Planetarium program called Stellarium onto your computer, set it to your location, load your telescope and eyepiece in the "Oculars" section, and plan your next observing session!   smile.gif

I actually have it on my phone, just learning how to use it.  I'm finding it hard to use to actually find anything once I use the scope. 



#22 Tusck

Tusck

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Philadelphia, PA

Posted 29 January 2020 - 07:37 PM

Hey there, and CONGRATS!

 

  That's super cool - and should be an awesome scope for years and years.  As a matter of fact, a great book sits on my shelf that was written by a guy using that size refractor exclusively for his observations - Stephen James O'Mera's "The Messier Objects."  I've got a 4" refractor, too, and it rocks!  

 

  A few questions for you:  1. Do you only have an 8mm eyepiece?  If so, even when you find the Pleiades, Andromeda galaxy, etc, you'll be so zoomed in you won't really be able to see them. That's moderately high power, and definitely makes finding things a bit trickier.   2. Do you have a 2" diagonal with this, or is it the 1.25"?  Either way is cool, just a good thing to keep in mind when shopping for extra eyepieces.  A nice 25-30mm eyepiece will give you beautiful low-power widefield views here.   Good news:  there's choices ranging from $30 on up, with plenty of cool stuff on the classifieds here.  (I saw a Vixen 30mm for $150 and a 13mm Nagler for under that today!)  

 

  Have a blast...what a great scope you've got there!!

 

Nice!  I really do like the scope.  I have a 25mm and the 8mm that came with the scope.  I figured the 8mm was just to high powered.  It came with a 2" diagonal and I think it has an adaptor for 1.25".  



#23 Tusck

Tusck

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Philadelphia, PA

Posted 29 January 2020 - 07:39 PM

 

 

The other thing to consider is a wide field eyepiece in 2" (2" always has wider field of vie than 1.25").  Something like the explore scientific 2" 30mm, 82 degree would get you close to 3 degree field of view.  You need that to see the entirety of Pleade's or dark sky Andromeda.  Having almost 3 degree field of view will also make it so very much easier to find things.  Others might be able to suggest some similar eyepieces that are cheaper than the explore scientific.

 

Next steps after the wide field eyepiece would be a barlow (probably 1.25") - you would turn the 25 into a 12.5mm, and maybe something in the 1.25" 16mm range (it will barlow down to 8 mm).  This will fill in the high magnification ranges.  Your 5mm is about as high magnification as you will want to go with that scope. 

 

Finally, you might want to look into a UHC nebula filter.  These allow things like Orion, ring nebula, and dumbell nebula to pop out more.  You will be able to see those in bortle 7 skies - though they can be difficult to find. 

Thank you for those suggestions.  I'll keep that in mind for whenI get to the point that I want to purchase something more.  



#24 Tusck

Tusck

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Philadelphia, PA

Posted 29 January 2020 - 07:43 PM

Hi, I'm so glad you had a good night out.

 

What kind of mount do you have?

If it is alt-az, one thing that will  help you is a digital angle meter you can get off of amazon or at a hardware store.

And download stellarium or sky-safari to a tablet or cell phone.

 

sky-safari will give you real time coordinates of any object in the sky.

Level your tripod.

With the angle meter, you can hold it momentarily on your scope's tube, and get the elevation set correctly for what sky-safari says.  Then you just have to pan left-to-right.   Having one dimension limited is a big help in finding items, especially in light pollution.

 

I live in a red zone, and do this when I am looking for a new object that I don't know how to find.

Also it helps to get that first object in your scope to zero in your finder.

 

It an alt-az mount, I'd have to go check which type.  I need to look into this digital angle meter, this sounds like just what I need. Thank you for this awesome suggestion!



#25 Anony

Anony

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 167
  • Joined: 24 Oct 2018
  • Loc: Long Island, NY

Posted 01 February 2020 - 05:02 PM

It an alt-az mount, I'd have to go check which type.  I need to look into this digital angle meter, this sounds like just what I need. Thank you for this awesome suggestion!

Don't forget the circles too. Might as well add them if going with the angle meter.

 

I have a recent thread up here on circles for a 4" refractor (which didn't go so well, but it's not the circles' fault) , and I'm sure if you search you can find older ones that are better. Some folks use plastic ones and cut away the middle.  But you can print out a 360 degree protractor (7-8" probably would fit), cut it out nice and round, measure a center hole and cut away, and add a cardboard backing... should work fine as a test. Then find a place to put it on the mount so it's not in the way. And add a little pointer.

 

In my case, the circle worked fine... the mount on the other hand, not so fine.


  • clearwaterdave likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics