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Betelgeuse May Never Explode

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#1 ILikePluto

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 09:20 AM

More evidence is emerging that not all red supergiants go supernova, which raises the possibility that Betelgeuse may fail to blow up:

 

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences:  url=https://www.pnas.org/content/117/3/1240?cct=1971


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#2 Astroman007

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 09:42 AM

Can't say I'd be happy to see the Hunter lose his shoulder, however extraordinary the display in death may be.

 

T Coronae Borealis, though, is another matter. Another outburst should be coming up in the next few years, I believe.


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#3 llanitedave

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 09:50 AM

The idea that Betelgeuse is actually a merged double with two cores is fascinating, especially if each core is below the threshold for a supernova.  I'm not sure about the mechanics of that arrangement, though.  If they've come close enough for the cores to merge inside the atmospheric envelope, what's to stop them from coming closer and combining into a single core that does have the mass required for a supernova?

 

--Edit:  Teach me to read the link before posting a response!  I was thinking of another article I recently read, which posits that Betelgeuse may be a combination of two stellar cores wrapped up in a single outer envelope.

 

The failed supernova idea is also pretty intriguing, but from reading this article, applying it to Betelgeuse may be a bit of a stretch.


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#4 Jim_V

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 06:51 PM

Time will give the answer. 


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#5 llanitedave

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Posted 22 January 2020 - 06:58 PM

Time will give the answer. 

And take it away!



#6 rockethead26

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 12:06 AM

Interesting that a star could be too big to supernova. Collapsing directly to a black hole is a wild concept, but it actually makes a little sense,. It would literally wink out of existence.



#7 CygnuS

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 12:00 PM

What'll they think of next?! 

The good news is that we wouldn't have to worry about X-rays and gamma rays here on Earth....if that was even a possibility or not. As I recall, scientists were all over the board trying to figure out if Betelgeuse could hurt us when it went SN. 




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