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First to a Supernova

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#1 MikiSJ

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 03:40 AM

I was reading the thread "January 2020 Supernova" and I was wondering if any of the members here was the first to report a SN.

 

Once I get my C11/CGX up and running, SN Patrolling is one of my interests that I would like to pursue.


Edited by MikiSJ, 24 January 2020 - 03:41 AM.

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#2 AaronF

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 03:55 AM

The dear departed drift-scan pioneer Nytecam did [archive.org copy of his original report]


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#3 dcornelis

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 06:40 AM

And then there is this : https://wis-tns.weiz.../discovery-cert

 

It was a supernova, only no professional observatory could be found to take an interest and make spectroscopic observation on it to classify it as a supernova. Big disappointment to me and Denis. 

 

I always check my images quickly against DSS2 and DSS3 that I find in wikisky.

 

Cheers,

Dirk


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#4 StanH

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 10:00 AM

MikiSJ, Good luck with the search.  Even with all the all-sky surveys gobbling up most of the supernovae, there are a few that they miss either due to inclement weather or too close to the horizons.

 

Back in 1994, I may have visually discovered a supernova in NGC 5263 which is near M3.  I sent a letter to CBAT, but there was no follow up.  This was also before I had internet access to post about it.  Alas, my next view of the galaxy was over three weeks later and nothing was apparent.

 

Otherwise, I did find a number of supernovae through one of the professional searches For the most part I was the only one going through their images for about five years.  Finally had to retire from it as going through thousands of images each month caught up with me.  It's not the same as finding them yourself, but it fulfilled my teenage dream of following in Clyde Tombaugh's footsteps of blinking images and finding new objects - the only difference is he did the whole process of taking the images and developing the plates before eyeballing the images.  That leaves me in more awe of what he did.


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#5 MikiSJ

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 02:36 PM

Thanks to all of you for finding those old post and your comments.

 

Before the internet, it took a telegram to the  Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory to notify the astronomy community of a new find. I suspect that a telegram, something that cost money and actually took an effort to send, may have garnered more interest than the proliferation of instant messaging we have today.

 

In my local backyard was a guy (now lives in AZ), a fellow amateur astronomer who has discovered a bunch of new comets. His name is Don Machholz. There is a good autobiographical comment on how he found his first comet. Imagine arriving a home after reporting what may be a new comet and receiving a call from the Smithsonian:  "The comet has been confirmed", he [caller] said. "It is how known as Comet Machholz, 1978L." Don Maccholz has alone or shared discovery in 12 comets, the last in 2018. You can read about Don Maccholz at http://www.foxworks....omet-1978l.html and at  https://en.wikipedia...z#Personal_life.

 

Also, I had the opportunity to meet Dave Jurasevich who shares the 2007 discovery of "The Soap Bubble" nebula shortly after its discovery. It is amazing that the Soap Bubble was never described in any catalog, but now it is due to an amateur astronomer's effort.



#6 Clouzot

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 03:00 PM

By the way, how does one signal a SN (or something else) to the professionals? Is there a point of entry for us amateurs?

#7 Knasal

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 06:39 PM

Yes the worldwide center for reporting transient astronomical discoveries is The Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams.

 

Since 2016, the transient name server is where SN discoveries are reported: see here - https://wis-tns.weizmann.ac.il

 

See here for other events/ items that you may wish to report:

 

https://www.iau.org/...es/discoveries/

 

Kevin


Edited by Knasal, 25 January 2020 - 03:58 PM.

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