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The continued unprecedented fading of Betelgeuse

observing Orion sketching
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#1 Aquarellia

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 09:55 AM

Don't forget to have a quick look to Alpha Orionis !  The Orion constellation looks strange now.

It is now fainter than it has been since the begining of modern observations more than 100 years ago. 

My last visual (of course) estimation gives +1.55, that also means that in the range of all the brillant stars, Betelgeuse is decreasing from the 9th place to the 25th one !

 

SketchBook-Betelgeuse_ll.jpg

 

Up left the AAVSO visual curve, on the bottom right the spectro comparisons 2019 / 2020 made by Christophe Pellier.

For more information about it follow the link : https://www.cloudyni...s-faint-for-it/

The last ATel about this subject is here : http://www.astronome...org/?read=13410

 

Clear sky to you all

Michel


Edited by Aquarellia, 24 January 2020 - 09:57 AM.

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#2 frank5817

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 10:09 AM

Michel,

 

Great looking sketch of Orion and the winter scene. I went out to look at it last night and you are correct. Betelgeuse looks so dim now and  that alters the look of the constellation. The graphs nicely show the change.


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#3 TOMDEY

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 10:26 AM

Nice rendition! It's gone from a mild curiosity to an ~event~! If this continues... lots of people are going to be habitually checking. And if (when?) it actually blows... it would be dangerous to even look at it, especially through a telescope! The brightness of the moon concentrated into a single point! This old film picture I took of a star gives some idea of how it might feel.    Tom

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  • 37 bright star Almach mag 2.1.jpg

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#4 tjschultz2011

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 10:48 AM

Just out of curiosity, if it did go supernova and I were to point a decent sized telescope at it using something like a variable polarizing filter (or maybe even a Ha solar scope?) would there be anything to see? Any structure initially or just a bright blob? How might it progress structure-wise?

 

Thanks, 

TJ 



#5 David Gray

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 11:03 AM

Something I’ve not seen mentioned in connection with it going supernova; possibly maxing around magnitude -12 (~ Full Moon brightness), 

there may be another effect on individuals apart from dazzle........  

 

Still a point source: the twinkling of such a bright star may well cause unpleasant – dangerous even – issues for the more

sensitive individuals at least: e.g. epileptics.......

 

Indeed even if screened by a degree of cloud it might be very evident as a pulsing sheet of light.

 

Dave.


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#6 Aquarellia

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 11:09 AM

Nice rendition! It's gone from a mild curiosity to an ~event~! If this continues... lots of people are going to be habitually checking. And if (when?) it actually blows... it would be dangerous to even look at it, especially through a telescope! The brightness of the moon concentrated into a single point! This old film picture I took of a star gives some idea of how it might feel.    Tom

Well Betelgeuse as SN ... it's not for soon as shown by the spectral results, but ok, we never know !

 

Michel



#7 Aquarellia

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 11:14 AM

Just out of curiosity, if it did go supernova and I were to point a decent sized telescope at it using something like a variable polarizing filter (or maybe even a Ha solar scope?) would there be anything to see? Any structure initially or just a bright blob? How might it progress structure-wise?

 

Thanks, 

TJ 

If after the explosion you can wait +/- 1000 years (so you need a good medical doctor lol.gif ) you will maybe be able to see a nebula as M1...

 

Michel


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#8 TOMDEY

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 12:16 PM

Well Betelgeuse as SN ... it's not for soon as shown by the spectral results, but ok, we never know !

 

Michel

A hand grenade with the pin 99% slid out. At least worth keeping an eye on...    Tom


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#9 niteskystargazer

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 03:04 PM

Michel,

 

Very good sketch of The continued unprecedented fading of Betelgeuse smile.gif .

 

CS,KLU,

 

thanx.gif ,

 

Tom


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#10 Special Ed

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 02:38 PM

Great sketch and report, Michel.  smile.gif   I've been watching Betelgeuse since mid-December and it's been fascinating to watch it dim down and change the familiar overall appearance of the constellation.

 

There's another big thread on the subject in the General Observing forum:

 

 https://www.cloudyni...aint/?p=9829354


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#11 astronz59

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 08:39 PM

Don't forget to have a quick look to Alpha Orionis !  The Orion constellation looks strange now.

It is now fainter than it has been since the begining of modern observations more than 100 years ago. 

My last visual (of course) estimation gives +1.55, that also means that in the range of all the brillant stars, Betelgeuse is decreasing from the 9th place to the 25th one !

 

attachicon.gifSketchBook-Betelgeuse_ll.jpg

 

Up left the AAVSO visual curve, on the bottom right the spectro comparisons 2019 / 2020 made by Christophe Pellier.

For more information about it follow the link : https://www.cloudyni...s-faint-for-it/

The last ATel about this subject is here : http://www.astronome...org/?read=13410

 

Clear sky to you all

Michel

Great work and art, Michel! I calculated an estimated magnitude of 1.48  on the 19th. Here is a shot of the calculation made in my fieldbook illustrating the method and math involved. Not rocket science, but gives quite reasonable results with practice:

 

Fieldbook.JPG


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#12 Asbytec

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 08:54 PM

Great topic. I was aware of Betelgeuse dimming, and it did seem dimmer. But I could not tell if I was imagining things. If others are seeing it, then maybe it actually is dimmer. That's amazing. 


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#13 GUS.K

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 09:58 PM

Thanks for sharing Michel.



#14 Aquarellia

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Posted 26 January 2020 - 02:10 AM

Great work and art, Michel! I calculated an estimated magnitude of 1.48  on the 19th. Here is a shot of the calculation made in my fieldbook illustrating the method and math involved. Not rocket science, but gives quite reasonable results with practice:

 

attachicon.gifFieldbook.JPG

Hi

Thank you for your comments
I use exactly the same method than yours and I maybe understand the small difference between your result and mine, well less than a tenth of magnitrude, so we both are in line.

I send you a personal message about this small difference and other concepts.

 

Michel




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