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1800s to 1910s Galilean binoculars

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#1 astronomer10

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 02:25 PM

I' ve been  an expert for decades, from small to 24" scopes....but now i want to venture in the world of VERY antique galilean binos....

 

Can anyone tell me their impressions of LeMaire ( Paris ) , Lindstrom ( Germany ) and Cornelius Knudsen ( Denmark) antique galilean binos with

 

40-50mm (or larger) front objectives...you know, these are the binos made 1860s to 1910s with erect image , simple designs, narrow field of view.

 

Which have you tried and which you liked on the night sky or daytime views ....and forget for now modern binos ! ( I have Fujinon 10x50 FMT-SX Coast Guard).

 

Thanks!!!!


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#2 j.gardavsky

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 03:02 PM

My oldiest collectible galilean binocs are from Plössl in Wien, and the youngiest are the late Victorian from Dollond in London..

Not yet tried them on the DSOs, but the idea is cool.

 

As a young boy, I mean a school kid, I have been using my grandfather's WWI galilean binos when watching the night skies, and the first objects have been the Hercules Cluster , the Andromeda Galaxy, and later in winter the Great Orion Nebula.

 

Best,

JG


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#3 j.gardavsky

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 03:30 PM

And here are the galilean binoculars in my vintage optics collection

 

Plössl Wien binoculars 1862 - 1870.jpg

 

Dollond London galilean binoculars.jpg

 

and the French WWI

 

French WWI 4x40 galilean binoculars and 3x24 galilean monocular.jpg

 

Thank you for looking,

JG

 

 


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#4 astronomer10

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 03:52 PM

Which of those has the sharpest cleanest views?



#5 j.gardavsky

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 04:03 PM

Hello Ed,

 

for the night skies viewing, I would take the Dollond's.

 

Should you start the DSOs hunting with the galilean binos, I would join the fun,

JG



#6 ch2co

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 05:40 PM

I know that this probably  isn't the direction that you want to go, but there are very low power Galilean 'binoculars' out there that I have found to be great sky scanning binos.

Mine are the homemade version that utilize old Nikon telephoto add-on camera lenses that nobody uses anymore. 2.3 power X 63mm with a field of view of around 28 degrees*. 

Very similar commercial versions are available from Russia and China. Consider them constellation binoculars. I carry them in my coat pocket whenever there's a chance of clear sky. I feel that I gain about 1.5 to 2.5 levels of magnitude with them and yes you can see some brighter nebulosites with them. 

The Galilean optics produce a completely different type of viewing experience when compared to their Keplarian cousins. 

I have a pair of old (early 1900's) "binoculars" of my dads. I am used to referring to non-prism binos as field glasses. They really are Galilean optics that have a very small field of view. They are not well suited at all to viewing the heavens (or much of anything really). There is no comparison of their view with that of my little pocket friends or to anything else in my binocular stable. 

The simplicity of no prisms, ultra light weight and amazingly wide field of view make these my favorite pre-viewing devices when I'm using my other binoculars or one of my scopes. They're a great help in determining seeing conditions before you go lugging out the big guns. 


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#7 MartinPond

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 10:03 PM

Which of those has the sharpest cleanest views?

Between Galileans, it's hard to tell.

The power is low, the front achromats, when

  the balsam is still all clear, are usually great,

   and the mechanics of the small ones are good,

   for LeMaire and Dollonds.   Dollonds fair a bit

    better because the the baffling is better.

    Zeiss opera glasses are like that too...4 irises,

    maybe excessive.

 

It's amazing how many LeMaires were made, often

   branded with the name of a US city jewelry shop.

 

 

The best opera glasses I have are  an odd label,

  Grodenstock (Munchen)   "Eldis".  

 

Although the power is low, nice Galileans can

   make very tiny pinprick stars.


Edited by MartinPond, 27 January 2020 - 10:05 PM.

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#8 DeanD

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Posted 28 January 2020 - 07:21 AM

I know that this probably  isn't the direction that you want to go, but there are very low power Galilean 'binoculars' out there that I have found to be great sky scanning binos.

Mine are the homemade version that utilize old Nikon telephoto add-on camera lenses that nobody uses anymore. 2.3 power X 63mm with a field of view of around 28 degrees*. 

Very similar commercial versions are available from Russia and China. Consider them constellation binoculars. I carry them in my coat pocket whenever there's a chance of clear sky. I feel that I gain about 1.5 to 2.5 levels of magnitude with them and yes you can see some brighter nebulosites with them. 

The Galilean optics produce a completely different type of viewing experience when compared to their Keplarian cousins. 

I have a pair of old (early 1900's) "binoculars" of my dads. I am used to referring to non-prism binos as field glasses. They really are Galilean optics that have a very small field of view. They are not well suited at all to viewing the heavens (or much of anything really). There is no comparison of their view with that of my little pocket friends or to anything else in my binocular stable. 

The simplicity of no prisms, ultra light weight and amazingly wide field of view make these my favorite pre-viewing devices when I'm using my other binoculars or one of my scopes. They're a great help in determining seeing conditions before you go lugging out the big guns. 

The Nikons sound interesting. Can you post an image of what you have done to construct a binocular out of these? I have a 3x teleconverter for my Nikon 4300 camera. It has a diameter of around 64mm but it has a "sweet spot" FOV of only around 10 degrees. Is this the sort of thing you are using?

 

Thanks, and all the best,

 

Dean



#9 j.gardavsky

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Posted 28 January 2020 - 09:15 AM

The Dollond's have 2" Imperial front lenses, the magnification is close to 3.5x or slightly above, the field must be still checked, but the Auriga Messiers should easily slip inside - my guess.

Optically, they have the best condition in my galilean collection.

Thanks to the bone body and a minimum of brass, they are extremely light weight if compared with the Continental galileans.

 

Best,

JG


Edited by j.gardavsky, 28 January 2020 - 09:15 AM.



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