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M-42 in Orion

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#1 Miranda2525

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 10:07 AM

Is there a pic somewhere online where it breaks down the exact types of nebulae in and around M-42 in Orion? I was just wondering because I wanted to try an OIII, UHC and H-Beta on it to check out the differences in what I could see. 

 

Thanks!



#2 Waddensky

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 11:40 AM

On this page, a picture of the chart around the M42 region can be found from the Interstellarum Deek Sky Atlas. As you can see from the little icons on the nebula, UHC [U] works best on M42, M43 stands out more in H-BETA [H]. Some other nebulae around (N1973, -75, -77 and -99) are reflection nebulae (blue), so narrowband filters won't help much.

 

An in-depth analysis of the performance of filters on nebulae can be found on Dave Knisely's page.


Edited by Waddensky, 01 February 2020 - 11:41 AM.


#3 N3p

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 03:27 PM

I took an image of the whole molecular cloud complex and drew a couple of major parts in my star atlas.. then I tried to look around different stars with the telescope and filters using that image, or the drawing inside my atlas.. Unfortunately I could not see anything of the Bernard's loop. I think I saw hints of the H beta SH2-264 the North Orion bubble.. with a NPB filter.

 

It's wider then only M42 of course but I did a small wrap up basically of the H-beta sectors.

 

I found information of various parts of the complex using mainly wikipedia.. and inside the book "atlas of the messier objects" to get knowledge about the stars more then the nebula.. It's not what you are looking for but perhaps you will nee to start something from scratch.

 

 

2020-02-16 - UPDATE
The author of the picture is Rogelio Bernal Andreo, the picture is from Wikipedia.

 

EyqB8kM.jpg


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#4 sunnyday

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 03:54 PM

I took an image of the whole molecular cloud complex and drew a couple of major parts in my star atlas.. then I tried to look around different stars with the telescope and filters using that image, or the drawing inside my atlas.. Unfortunately I could not see anything of the Bernard's loop. I think I saw hints of the H beta SH2-264 the North Orion bubble.. with a NPB filter.

 

It's wider then only M42 of course but I did a small wrap up basically of the H-beta sectors.

 

I found information of various parts of the complex using mainly wikipedia.. and inside the book "atlas of the messier objects" to get knowledge about the stars more then the nebula.. It's not what you are looking for but perhaps you will nee to start something from scratch.

 

 

EyqB8kM.jpg

all simply magnificent



#5 N3p

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 04:14 PM

all simply magnificent

Totally, I agree with your it's incredible, a wonder.


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#6 TNmike

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 08:13 PM

What is that "lizard" in the lower right hand corner (right of Rigel)? I am unfamiliar with it.



#7 N3p

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 09:30 PM

it's the witch head I think, a reflection nebula not enhanced by any filters.


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#8 Miranda2525

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 06:25 AM

I guess I should have been more "specific". What I am specifically looking for is just M-42 and what lies inside of it. 

 

The link below and the first pic with the sections is something more of what I want to know about. Thanks!

 

http://www.stsci.edu...st2/odellr.html



#9 Tony Flanders

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 07:48 AM

Is there a pic somewhere online where it breaks down the exact types of nebulae in and around M-42 in Orion? I was just wondering because I wanted to try an OIII, UHC and H-Beta on it to check out the differences in what I could see.


If you have the filters, try them and see what you can see. Different people have different reactions. For what it's worth, the distinctions that you're seeking don't exist in real life. All emission nebulae have a significant reflection component, and that's especially true in the case of M42.
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#10 j.gardavsky

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 11:18 AM

Click on M42 + topographia

to find the detailed map.

 

I have it as *.pdf, but it is too large for attachement,

JG



#11 j.gardavsky

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 11:20 AM

I took an image of the whole molecular cloud complex and drew a couple of major parts in my star atlas.. then I tried to look around different stars with the telescope and filters using that image, or the drawing inside my atlas.. Unfortunately I could not see anything of the Bernard's loop. I think I saw hints of the H beta SH2-264 the North Orion bubble.. with a NPB filter.

 

It's wider then only M42 of course but I did a small wrap up basically of the H-beta sectors.

 

I found information of various parts of the complex using mainly wikipedia.. and inside the book "atlas of the messier objects" to get knowledge about the stars more then the nebula.. It's not what you are looking for but perhaps you will nee to start something from scratch.

 

 

EyqB8kM.jpg

This is an excellent capture of the Orion Bubble.

Thanks,

JG



#12 j.gardavsky

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 11:21 AM

Click on M42 + topographia

to find the detailed map.

 

I have it as *.pdf, but it is too large for attachement,

JG



#13 Miranda2525

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 12:06 PM

Click on M42 + topographia

to find the detailed map.

 

I have it as *.pdf, but it is too large for attachement,

JG

Link?



#14 j.gardavsky

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 12:41 PM

Link?

https://theskysearch...p?t=4970#p42034

 

Sorry, it is in another forum,

JG


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#15 havasman

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 03:18 PM

Is there a pic somewhere online where it breaks down the exact types of nebulae in and around M-42 in Orion? I was just wondering because I wanted to try an OIII, UHC and H-Beta on it to check out the differences in what I could see. 

 

Thanks!

Do it. You will see! 

 

M42 emits at high amplitudes across broad spectrum. The different filters will emphasize different regions and features of the nebula. You will not need a picture to guide you. It is dramatic and a highly recommended exercise. 



#16 N3p

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 05:13 PM

This is an excellent capture of the Orion Bubble.

Thanks,

JG

The author of the picture is Rogelio Bernal Andreo, it's a picture from Wikipedia. Occasionally they have impressive things on wikipedia.

 

https://en.wikipedia...Head_to_Toe.jpg


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#17 DavidC

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 10:45 PM

rigel witchhead.jpg You are right, it is IC2118, the witchhead Nebula to the right of the star Rigel. At 13 mag, 800 ly away, 70 ly across, it is a faint reflection nebula energized by rigel. Being that faint, I'll probably have to get out to dark skies so even see it.


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#18 John Gauvreau

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 03:42 PM

https://theskysearch...p?t=4970#p42034

 

Sorry, it is in another forum,

JG

That’s excellent!  Thanks for sharing.  


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#19 Waddensky

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 03:50 PM

https://theskysearch...p?t=4970#p42034

 

Sorry, it is in another forum,

JG

That's a wonderfully detailed map of the Orion Nebula. Thanks for sharing this!


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#20 j.gardavsky

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 04:04 PM

... yes, and most of the details in M42 become visible at the high magnifications above 100x.

 

Wishing you much fun at the EP,

JG



#21 j.gardavsky

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Posted 04 February 2020 - 04:59 PM

Hello friends,

 

here is once again the "Nebulosa di Orion" in overlay with the capture of Peter XL,

 

 http://www.astrotref...047&whichpage=2

 

Best,

JG


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#22 Miranda2525

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Posted 08 February 2020 - 07:18 AM

Hello friends,

 

here is once again the "Nebulosa di Orion" in overlay with the capture of Peter XL,

 

 http://www.astrotref...047&whichpage=2

 

Best,

JG

Thanks j.gardavsky!


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#23 laedco58

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Posted 12 February 2020 - 12:36 PM

Very cool, next clear night out with my NP 127 and the 31 Nagler, I’ll try the two filters I have to see what effect they have.



#24 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 12 February 2020 - 01:46 PM

attachicon.gifrigel witchhead.jpgYou are right, it is IC2118, the witchhead Nebula to the right of the star Rigel. At 13 mag, 800 ly away, 70 ly across, it is a faint reflection nebula energized by rigel. Being that faint, I'll probably have to get out to dark skies so even see it.

IC 2118 is a very difficult visual target from my latitude.  I've only ever seen it once, using my 101mm f/5.4 Tele Vue refractor.  



#25 Pcbessa

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Posted 13 February 2020 - 05:10 PM

I have just had a glimpse of the witch hazel nebula. And the conditions were not excellent, though the milky way was visible across Gemini. I could only notice adim subtle change in sky brightness along the defined edge on the brightest art of the nebula. Very faint. The UHC filter made the difference between not visible and faintly visible.

I would rank it like this, when compared with other nearby nebula:
Orion /Monkeyhead/ Rosette / Flame / California / Medusa / IC434 and horse head / Jellyfish / angelfish/ Barnards loop / Witch head / Lower


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