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Radiation liking fungus at Chernoybl

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#1 Pess

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 05:48 AM

Should we be afraid?

 

 https://www.realclea...mowxzVtfU4RjB4U

 

Pesse (#Monsterfungusamongus) Mist



#2 scottk

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 09:15 AM

That reminds me of some sci-fi novel I started reading but didn't finish. It began with a tale of two micro-organisms crawling around on the surface of a neutron star.

#3 pyrasanth

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 09:18 AM

Should we be afraid?

 

 https://www.realclea...mowxzVtfU4RjB4U

 

Pesse (#Monsterfungusamongus) Mist

This is really interesting. It shows how incredibly adaptable life is. There are other extreme examples of bacteria surviving in oceanic volcanic vents that would boil alive other creatures. I don't think we should be worried.....much.  


Edited by pyrasanth, 05 February 2020 - 09:19 AM.


#4 later

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Posted 06 February 2020 - 06:19 PM

"That reminds me of some sci-fi novel I started reading but didn't finish. It began with a tale of two micro-organisms crawling around on the surface of a neutron star."

 

Dragons Egg.           Robert L. Forward           1980

 

 

I asked a friend (with a thousand sci-fi books on his shelf)........If I were to read one book off this shelf, which one should I read.

He said Dragons Egg.  He said it will change the way you think for the rest of your life.

 

I read it and agree.


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#5 Pess

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Posted 06 February 2020 - 07:18 PM

"That reminds me of some sci-fi novel I started reading but didn't finish. It began with a tale of two micro-organisms crawling around on the surface of a neutron star."

 

Dragons Egg.           Robert L. Forward           1980

 

 

I asked a friend (with a thousand sci-fi books on his shelf)........If I were to read one book off this shelf, which one should I read.

He said Dragons Egg.  He said it will change the way you think for the rest of your life.

 

I read it and agree.

 

I read a scifi novel 45+ something years ago. I vaguely remember its title as ' Negative 350 degrees kelvin' or something similar.

 

t was about the discovery of tiny intelligent lifeforms that had developed in a super cold planet or asteroid (I forget) environment.  Talked about the enzymes and other molecules and how they evolved to work just fine at this temp but would fly apart at room temperature.

 

I've read a lot of books since then but that one stuck with me.  And this was a time before exthermophiles were discovered. 

 

Pesse (I've always said that, if evolution is valid, life evolves to fit the niche. The niche doesn't have to be specific for life) Mist

 

 


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#6 Forward Scatter

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Posted 06 February 2020 - 08:12 PM

Pseudomonas radiolurans was found growing in the primary cooling loops of nuclear reactors. Another P. syringae subspecie was found growing in bleach. A fungus was isolated that metabolizes PCBs. The adaptability and capabilities of microbial life is amazing and they should be worshipped as our betters. bow.gif

 

They found the fungi growing on the graphite as its carbon source. I bet they moved up the radiation gradient due to the radiation-induced brittling of the graphite. The rad flux may just made their dinner more easily digested, similar to Beano.

 

The melanin hypothesis is intriguing. 



#7 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 06 February 2020 - 10:07 PM

I seem to remember a podcast (Joe Rogan?) with Paul Stamets, where he mentions his book "Mycelium Running: How mushrooms can save the world". He talks about mushrooms growing in irradiated places, and mushrooms that break down oil from oil spills. Fungi are quite incredible... I know from experience back in the day...

#8 llanitedave

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Posted 08 February 2020 - 02:35 AM

I read a scifi novel 45+ something years ago. I vaguely remember its title as ' Negative 350 degrees kelvin' or something similar.

 

t was about the discovery of tiny intelligent lifeforms that had developed in a super cold planet or asteroid (I forget) environment.  Talked about the enzymes and other molecules and how they evolved to work just fine at this temp but would fly apart at room temperature.

 

I've read a lot of books since then but that one stuck with me.  And this was a time before exthermophiles were discovered. 

 

Pesse (I've always said that, if evolution is valid, life evolves to fit the niche. The niche doesn't have to be specific for life) Mist

Evolution is valid, but that doesn't make it infinite.


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#9 Pess

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Posted 15 February 2020 - 06:38 AM

Evolution is valid, but that doesn't make it infinite.

All you need is an energy source, a stable niche that endures and something that can be utilized as building blocks for biological structures.

 

I think the trick is to come up with some sort of self-replicating biological system that can pass traits onto successive generations.

 

Once you have that, the rest of evolution is trivial.

 

The radiation loving bacteria is a perfect example. They did not 'spontaneously arise'. In fact,  Pseudomonas radiolurans as you know is one of the most common bacteria on earth and one of the reasons antiperspirants were invented  ;)   

 

They just happened to be around and, over time, the hardest were selected until eventually you have a nice happy colony munching on the graphite.

 

They obviously evolved some simple system for repairing DNA damage from the radiation (hmm, the possibilities in humans!).  

 

But where did the great, great, great.....great granddaddy of  Pseudomonas radiolurans get his start?

 

Pesse (I was born a poor protocell living in a cracked rock on the Eastern shores of Africa.....) Mist


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#10 scottk

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Posted 15 February 2020 - 06:48 AM

"All you need is an energy source, a stable niche that endures and something that can be utilized as building blocks for biological structures."

I love this stuff. Do you have anything to recommend reading on the topic of the origin of life? I've read 3 or 4 books on the subject that I really liked, but I stopped studying the general subject over time because I couldn't find any more material that I felt I could trust.

The tendency to mutate fits in there somewhere.

#11 scottk

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Posted 15 February 2020 - 06:51 AM

The term "LUCA" always sort of gave me chills.

https://en.m.wikiped...common_ancestor

#12 Jim_V

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Posted 16 February 2020 - 08:40 AM

Interesting article. 




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