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Software to measure changing luminosity of stars

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#1 Singlin

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 06:17 PM

Excuse my ignorance about such matters.

Is their a software that I could use to see the changes of brightness of Betelgeuse over a period of a couple of months?

If so how?

Regards,

Simon



#2 S.Boerner

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 06:37 PM

A good place to start is the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO).  They have a number of manuals that you can look at.   I'd suggest looking at the Visual, CCD, and DSLR manuals. 

 

Another good document is the "Photometry Software Calibration and Photometry Tutorials (V 1.0)" who's link is at the bottom of the DSLR page under the observing-manuals page above.  The Tutorials show how four different pieces of software can be use to monitor a star's brightness.  While some of the software is $, MuniWin is free.  (http://c-munipack.sourceforge.net/)

 

There are also some MuniWin tutorials on Youtube:  https://www.youtube....h_query=muniwin


Edited by S.Boerner, 14 February 2020 - 06:55 PM.

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#3 rkinnett

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 07:52 PM

If you're handy with coding, math, and image processing, you could write something yourself.  This shouldn't be too hard if you design it around just a single target with repeatable source images, as opposed to architecting a full-blown photometry package to work on any target with variable inputs.  You could do this quite easily in Python.  You would start with some sort of either image registration or vectorized pattern search to identify prominent stars within each image, then gage the brightness of each of those reference stars.  You then could fit a least-squares log curve between the measured brightness values and known luminosity values from a catalog in order to interpolate the luminosity of Betelgeuse in the traditional magnitude scale.  This may sounds like caveman astronomy to any legitimate astronomer, but it sounds like fun to me.  I'm stuck in bed with a broken leg, otherwise I would get out and image it a few times a week.  I could help with coding if this approach sounds appealing.



#4 Singlin

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 04:22 AM

Thanks for the replies : I am looking into it.




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