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Are these colors right? DSLR image of NGC 7000

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#1 Dane90

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Posted 17 February 2020 - 07:13 AM

I think I processed the image right, but the nebula is very blue. Are these the right colors?

I usually see photo's of this object which are mostly red/pink, hence the question.

Is the blue color caused by oxygen / hydrogen-beta, or is it faulty processing?

 

The photo is taken under bortle 2 or 3 skies with a Canon EOS 800D (known in the Americas as Rebel T7i).

Roughly 2 hours worth of data, corrected with flats, darks and bias frames.

Stacked in Deep Sky Stacker and processed in PhotoShop.

 

Any help / feedback is appreciated smile.gif

 

Edit: where did the image go? I tried Imgur as well but it won't add the image to my post confused1.gif

 

Edit 2: got it, direct link to image due to size of image being over 500 KB (1.9 MB)


Edited by Dane90, 17 February 2020 - 03:31 PM.

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#2 einarin

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Posted 17 February 2020 - 07:18 AM

Seeing the image would help.

But if you have unmodded camera then it's typical to have less red than with modified or 'real' astro cameras.



#3 Dane90

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Posted 17 February 2020 - 07:26 AM

Seeing the image would help.

But if you have unmodded camera then it's typical to have less red than with modified or 'real' astro cameras.

Yeah I am not sure what happened to the image, but it has been added now :)
It is an unmodded camera, so it is probably way more sensitive in the blue and green region compared to the red



#4 BQ Octantis

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Posted 17 February 2020 - 07:26 AM

Looks good to me.

 

If you have a stock DSLR, you're out on the bleeding edge of AP. A stock DSLR isn't as sensitive to red or HII as modded or mono with Ha filters, so OIII will dominate. So your Tarantula Nebula will be cyan, and your Orion Nebula will be magenta with a cyan core. So be grateful to be a pathfinder for others.

 

BQ

 

P.S. To feel better about your results, see Roger Clark's post on colors of the deep sky (once it's back online):

 

http://www.clarkvisi...erstellar.dust/


Edited by BQ Octantis, 17 February 2020 - 07:29 AM.

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#5 Dane90

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Posted 17 February 2020 - 07:37 AM

Looks good to me.

 

If you have a stock DSLR, you're out on the bleeding edge of AP. A stock DSLR isn't as sensitive to red or HII as modded or mono with Ha filters, so OIII will dominate. So your Tarantula Nebula will be cyan, and your Orion Nebula will be magenta with a cyan core. So be grateful to be a pathfinder for others.

 

BQ

 

P.S. To feel better about your results, see Roger Clark's post on colors of the deep sky (once it's back online):

 

http://www.clarkvisi...erstellar.dust/

That explains a lot, thanks.

I've stumbled upon Roger Clark's website on a few occasions, there's a lot of good info on there.

 

But it looks like my suspicions that it was the oxygen poking through was right :)




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