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Can I have sources on how a binoviewer works?

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#1 vpro8725

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Posted 20 February 2020 - 10:02 AM

Hello, I am a High School Student who just started Optics. I was assigned an assignment to do research on an optical device. I chose a binoviewer, because I thought that it would be interesting. I saw a few images and understood how it works. However, I need some good, reputable sources for my research. I have browsed through the pages of Google to no avail, so I'm here asking for help. Can you guys send me some links to reputable sources?



#2 Garyth64

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Posted 20 February 2020 - 10:21 AM

Welcome to CN.

 

Just google, "optical layout of binoculars"



#3 sg6

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Posted 20 February 2020 - 10:25 AM

https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Binoviewer

 

Google search is useful.

 

Optics are simple - 50/50 beam splitter then basic prisms to deliver both halves to eyepieces with the same path length.

 

Looking at the diagram the 50/50 split is the first 45 degree one. Since glass is lesser reflection at 45 the a simple 50% must be coated to achieve the correct reflection/transmission. After that everything should be reflected so presume the 45 degrees angles on the end of each prism is silvered.


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#4 Justin Fuller

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Posted 20 February 2020 - 10:52 AM

https://www.rp-photo..._splitters.html beamsplitter info

 

https://www.rp-photo...com/prisms.html prism info

 

I would consider RP photonics a reputable source. 

 

You'll have to piece together the info to understand how the binoviewer as a whole works, but doing that work will help you understand your topic better.

 

More than a webpage, I recommend your school library or local library for books on basic optics/ introduction to optics. Look for Modern Optical Engineering by Warren Smoth, the chapter on prisms and mirror systems will provide all the info you need and is a highly reputable source.


Edited by Justin Fuller, 20 February 2020 - 11:07 AM.

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#5 TOMDEY

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Posted 20 February 2020 - 11:59 AM

You might also want to include that there are two fundamentally-different approaches to splitting the light to reach both eyes equally. One uses an optical coating that transmits half of the light and reflects the other half. The other approach disjointly diverts half of the light in one direction and half in the other direction. Here is a cloudy nights link to that second approach. Both approaches have their advantages and disadvantages.

 

Note: Here, on Cloudy Nights, we tend to think of everything, first and foremost, in terms of astronomical applications. But, Binoviewers (as we know them today) have been ubiquitously used for microscopy before becoming rather popular among avocational astronomers.

 

Here's that link >>>

 

https://www.cloudyni...er-mini-review/



#6 vpro8725

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 01:43 PM

Hey guys,

 

Thanks for the great advice. I managed to find a pretty great journal article by Geoff Gaherty. He clearly lists out the functions of the binoviewer, how it works, and the pros+cons. You can find it here (p.24).

 

Thanks again for the help!


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#7 faackanders2

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 09:40 PM

Also check out a local astronomy club and look through them.  Make your science project fun, and not just optical drawings and math.  Experience how they work and why astronomers like them!




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