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Hydrogen-boron fusion technology

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#1 Jii

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 05:25 PM

This came up in Slashdot:

 

https://newatlas.com...n-clean-energy/

 

Let's see how this plays out. It's good that not all of the eggs are in the same basket, hopefully some of the developed technologies comes though sooner than later.


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#2 Sleep Deprived

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 06:11 PM

These guys are thinking out-of-the-box.  It will be interesting to see where this goes.  Good thing SOMEONE is thinking out-of-the-box!

 

Thank you for posting the link.


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#3 Richard O'Neill

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 06:57 PM

I'll believe it when I see it.


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#4 TOMDEY

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 08:31 PM

OK, I read it... that's cool, as fundamental research, but also cool (as in not hot to trot) as a promising source of commercial energy. The biggest problem still remains... directed, insanely powerful laser pulses focusing upon and reliably/precisely hitting microscopic little pellets in a vacuum chamber like a continuous, flawless machine-gun... and extracting the massive, continuous energy output, without upsetting that delicate little chamber. At this point, no one can get that to occur with one single pellet and days of preparation for that single event... hoping it will produce more energy than it took to trigger it.

 

~ 'This is brand new,' Professor Hora tells us. '10-petawatt power laser pulses.' ~

 

I worked on target metrology decades ago. Fun, researchy... but all of these alternative energy technologies are infinitely over-promised and under-delivered. Which is the hallmark of academics just trying to tap into our tax money. Research is a business; whose goal is to... support researchers!    Tom, retired researcher scientist

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Edited by TOMDEY, 22 February 2020 - 08:32 PM.


#5 Richard O'Neill

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 10:33 PM

 Well, the science as described in the article is complete nonsense:

 

 “The hydrogen/boron fusion creates a couple of helium atoms," he continues. "They're naked heliums, they don't have electrons, so they have a positive charge. We just have to collect that charge. Essentially, the lack of electrons is a product of the reaction and it directly creates the current.”

 

 Naked helium atoms without electrons? Those are helium ions (as described elsewhere), aka alpha particles. But, wait a minute, where does the charge appear from? Shouldn’t it be conserved? If they start with neutral atoms, you have four electrons unaccounted for.

 

  Also, since you can’t push He2+ ions through wires, the final by-product must be helium gas, which is desperately needed by mankind. Depending on whether you slam a hydrogen atom or a hydrogen molecule into the boron atom, the leftover mass will either be another helium (atom?) or lithium - also good. This is the answer to the maiden’s prayer!

 

 Now - where can I invest in this futuristic technology? flowerred.gif



#6 Sleep Deprived

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 04:35 AM

There are a number of articles online about 'aneutronic fusion', and much of what is discussed in the OP's article is discussed in more detail.  Simply throwing boron and hydrogen together, one would normally need to heat the mixture to about 10 TIMES the temperature of the more widely known Deuterium-Tritium fusion reaction (s0, 100's of millions of degrees), to maintain the proton-boron fusion reaction.  There is evidence (and these scientists are pursuing this) that the proton-boron reaction can be done with high-powered lasers at much lower temperatures.  Some of the terms in the cited article here seem to be incorrect - the hydrogen-boron reaction that results in helium atoms is actually done with completely ionized atoms, so they should be referred to as ions.  They may be atoms when loaded in the hopper, but the atoms are ionized before the fusion reaction occurs.  There is still an equal number of protons and electrons - they have become separated though in the ionization process.  The positive ions (hydrogen=protons, helium=alpha particles, or boron=???) do not travel through any wires, but the electrons that were separated from the 'raw materials' do, thus the electrical current.  The boron-proton fusion reaction is well documented - the scientists cited above are experimenting with an alternate way to get this reaction to occur.  It seems to be an area ripe for research - it may or may not pan out as the scientists make it appear in the article, but it WON'T pan out if no one ever pursues it.



#7 DaveC2042

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 04:41 PM

Hmmm. There seem to be a few red flags here.

Press and company descriptions seem intent on portraying this as nearly up and running. Dig a bit and a prototype is a decade away.

The main guy is an Emeritus professor. That generally means it's a while since he was actively doing research.

Liberal use of the term 'non-linear' in situations where it doesn't seem to be relevant.

The company website timeline does a really good job of giving the impression that Nobel prize winners Strickland and Mourou (chirping laser inventors) are involved in the company. They aren't.

Hope I'm wrong, but I won't be holding my breath.
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#8 llanitedave

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 05:04 PM

Hmmm. There seem to be a few red flags here.

Press and company descriptions seem intent on portraying this as nearly up and running. Dig a bit and a prototype is a decade away.

The main guy is an Emeritus professor. That generally means it's a while since he was actively doing research.

Liberal use of the term 'non-linear' in situations where it doesn't seem to be relevant.

The company website timeline does a really good job of giving the impression that Nobel prize winners Strickland and Mourou (chirping laser inventors) are involved in the company. They aren't.

Hope I'm wrong, but I won't be holding my breath.

I think "red flag" is putting it kindly here.



#9 ColoHank

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 05:11 PM

I think "red flag" is putting it kindly here.

 

Yes, but thirty years from now, people on CN will be saying, "If I'd invested $100 in that enterprise back in 2020, it would be worth $280,900,550 today.



#10 DaveC2042

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 05:11 PM

I think "red flag" is putting it kindly here.

I'm a very kind person.



#11 DaveC2042

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 05:21 PM

Yes, but thirty years from now, people on CN will be saying, "If I'd invested $100 in that enterprise back in 2020, it would be worth $280,900,550 today.

Maybe it's the next Apple.

 

Maybe it's the next Theranos.

 

Maybe it's just another of the myriad startups that don't pan out the way they were supposed to, for a whole lot of fairly mundane reasons under the general umbrella of 'too hard'.  I had a stint in private equity a while ago, and I can assure you this is the fate of most tech start-ups.


Edited by DaveC2042, 24 February 2020 - 02:34 AM.

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