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ABS Boxes for neatly attaching EAA Devices.

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#1 Noah4x4

Noah4x4

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 04:49 PM

I have come up with a new way to affix EAA stuff to my scope worth sharing….

 

Two ABS electronics project boxes (200mm x 75mm x 120mm) are screwed back to back to a 2cm piece of MDF. A central slot in the MDF allows these to slide onto my tripod leg spreader rod. This image shows this contraption under construction and prior to painting the MDF.

 

Constructiuon.jpg

 

A power cable, USB3 cable and focuser cable run from the front ABS box in a single coiled (white) cable tidy to my OTA where it is affixed by a long Velcro strap around OTA, then along OTA length to Camera/Focuser (hence ultra-neat). By putting the weight of these peripheral devices below the centre of gravity my scope is easier to carry. The whole contraption slides on or off as one compact unit for transport.

 

Scope1.jpg

 

Externally, I have affixed an Intel NUC to one side (using VESA plate) and MKIT20 auto-focuser controller to another (Velcro straps). Inside the ABS boxes are hidden my AC/DC power supplies plus all connecting cables between NUC and MKIT20 autofocuser controller. Once again, this route offers ultra-neat cable management. Then, just a single cable to the floor to my mains supply as my activity is at home and I have a suitable garden power source. I think this DIY route looks as good and tidy as many proprietory devices (Eagle 3 etc).

 

Scope2.jpg

 

BTW, the item strapped to my mount carry arm is my SkySync GPS unit into which I plug my SkyPortal device. My HC is plugged into AUX1 and is affixed to mount arm. So only the white coiled spiral cable tidy extends below the point of rotation. The cables within are sufficiently long for my OTA to fully rotate 360 degrees twice without snagging (so <cord wrap> isn’t a problem, albeit it is set). The weight of the cable tidy means these cables always hang away from anything that they could snag upon (example, a wedge, not that I now use one).

 

The NUC runs Windows 10 Pro Remote Desktop with RemoteFX compression disabled. Sequence Generator Pro software (£99) controls camera and auto-focuser (could also control other ASCOM devices such as auto-guider). I use Celestron CPWI for remote scope control. Indoors, I use another PC as a dumb terminal to control scope side NUC over RDP. This all achieved wirelessly over a 5Ghz WAN.

 

The two ABS boxes were circa £10 each from Amazon. These are one of the best DIY finds I have made!


Edited by Noah4x4, 23 February 2020 - 04:51 PM.

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#2 HxPI

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Posted 01 March 2020 - 06:15 AM

I have come up with a new way to affix EAA stuff to my scope worth sharing….

 

Two ABS electronics project boxes (200mm x 75mm x 120mm) are screwed back to back to a 2cm piece of MDF. A central slot in the MDF allows these to slide onto my tripod leg spreader rod. This image shows this contraption under construction and prior to painting the MDF.

 

attachicon.gifConstructiuon.jpg

 

A power cable, USB3 cable and focuser cable run from the front ABS box in a single coiled (white) cable tidy to my OTA where it is affixed by a long Velcro strap around OTA, then along OTA length to Camera/Focuser (hence ultra-neat). By putting the weight of these peripheral devices below the centre of gravity my scope is easier to carry. The whole contraption slides on or off as one compact unit for transport.

 

attachicon.gifScope1.jpg

 

Externally, I have affixed an Intel NUC to one side (using VESA plate) and MKIT20 auto-focuser controller to another (Velcro straps). Inside the ABS boxes are hidden my AC/DC power supplies plus all connecting cables between NUC and MKIT20 autofocuser controller. Once again, this route offers ultra-neat cable management. Then, just a single cable to the floor to my mains supply as my activity is at home and I have a suitable garden power source. I think this DIY route looks as good and tidy as many proprietory devices (Eagle 3 etc).

 

attachicon.gifScope2.jpg

 

BTW, the item strapped to my mount carry arm is my SkySync GPS unit into which I plug my SkyPortal device. My HC is plugged into AUX1 and is affixed to mount arm. So only the white coiled spiral cable tidy extends below the point of rotation. The cables within are sufficiently long for my OTA to fully rotate 360 degrees twice without snagging (so <cord wrap> isn’t a problem, albeit it is set). The weight of the cable tidy means these cables always hang away from anything that they could snag upon (example, a wedge, not that I now use one).

 

The NUC runs Windows 10 Pro Remote Desktop with RemoteFX compression disabled. Sequence Generator Pro software (£99) controls camera and auto-focuser (could also control other ASCOM devices such as auto-guider). I use Celestron CPWI for remote scope control. Indoors, I use another PC as a dumb terminal to control scope side NUC over RDP. This all achieved wirelessly over a 5Ghz WAN.

 

The two ABS boxes were circa £10 each from Amazon. These are one of the best DIY finds I have made!

What resolution do you run the remote session? Using my iPad Pro RDP is fine, with my Surface Pro tablet it is choppy. I suppose it has something to do with the higher resolution of the Surface Pro tablet, and the resolution can not be adjusted to something lower without black bars on the screen. Windowed RDP session on a tablet just sucks!



#3 Noah4x4

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Posted 01 March 2020 - 08:28 AM

What resolution do you run the remote session? Using my iPad Pro RDP is fine, with my Surface Pro tablet it is choppy. I suppose it has something to do with the higher resolution of the Surface Pro tablet, and the resolution can not be adjusted to something lower without black bars on the screen. Windowed RDP session on a tablet just sucks!

My 16 Megapixel Atik Horizon offers 4644 x 3506 pixels.

However, my Intel NUC limits that to 4K UHD (3840 x 2160).

My Indoor NUC receives screen data at 3840 x 2160 and outputs that to a 4K UHD monitor.

 

Like you, I thought Windows RDP sucks! But that was before....

 

1. I disabled RemoteFX compression via Group Profiles.

 

RemoteFX compression prevents a single user from choking a commercial network with too much data. Stacking 4K files is huge. Disable it on your private WAN and data can flow more freely. 

 

2. I upgraded my Processor in both computers to 7th Generation i5 and 8 Gb RAM.

 

Anything less than this and at 4k UHD the graphics will be stealing system resources from RAM and HDD. I have since upgraded my scope side NUC to eighth generation i7 with 16 Gb RAM and only now am I enjoying the performance I desire. 

 

Before I discovered these tips, I spent a fortune upgrading WiFi and blaming remote desktop etc. 

 

The other issue is (as you highlight) resolution. RDP will take the resolution from the scope side computer. If less than 4K on that you can't enjoy 4K at the terminal display, even if camera and indoor computer have that capability. Similarly, if scope side computer is 4K, you will be limited by the lower resolution of the other. You need both computers to be set in the same resolution. 

 

My system now works gloriously in 4K UHD across a 5Ghz network. But it has taken an investment in computing power to succeed. I can't comment about Surface Pro, but I suspect your solutions lie somewhere within this post.


Edited by Noah4x4, 01 March 2020 - 08:30 AM.



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