Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Review: New Moon Telescope: 12.5” f/4.5

dob collimation equipment observing report reflector NV
  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#1 Mazerski

Mazerski

    Messenger

  • ****-
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 416
  • Joined: 13 Nov 2013

Posted 23 February 2020 - 05:41 PM

Background:

 

Drove down to Ryan’s shop (New Moon Telescopes) and discussed a 12.5” (f/4.5) scope. Ryan is very personable and a nice guy to chat with. He took the time to show and explain his scope making process. His woodworking and machine skills are really impressive. I told Ryan that I do not want an overly customized scope, just these items: wheelbarrow handles, right-angle finder, stalk for Nexus DSC and a focuser height approaching 58” (or so) off floor (without Crossbow attached).

 

Fast forward to December 2019…drove down with a friend to test scope at Ryan’s shop (without Crossbow) and while still light out, Ryan took scope apart and explained how to disassemble / assemble. The frame system that holds the tubes and upper ring assembly is very well thought out; lightweight and easy to put on and take off.

 

Collimating the scope with the Astrobeam II system was easy and straightforward, as was the alignment process using Nexus DSC. Slewing the scope was effortless and the balance was spot on. For testing, we used glass eyepieces and Night Vision (NV) intensifier tube (no moon). Achieving focus was not an issue and the views were crisp and bright – the Double Cluster, Pacman, Dumbbell and the Crescent Nebula and other objects looked great. Testing was a big success so we packed the scope in car and drove back.

 

Since I requested the focuser height be a few inches taller than standard, Ryan had to make the base box taller which required a few additional small but important additions to keep the scope stable when using and moving with wheelbarrow handles. See photos with embedded text. I really appreciate the thought Ryan put into how I needed to use the scope and these small additions he added are functional / necessary.

 

Use:

 

It is the best thing ever to wheel scope out door onto stone patio fully assembled. Collimating takes a minute or less as does hooking up the Nexus and Battery. Within 10 minutes from placing tarp on patio then wheeling scope out, all I need to do is align and start observing. The views are great even from my light polluted skies (the sky is darker at Ryan’s shop).

 

Examples:

 

== Of all DSOs that are visible in winter, M42 is the most spectacular. With NV it is simply fantastic. The New Moon (with NV) allows M42 and other emission nebula such as the Flame, Bubble and Pacman to show off.

== On star stuff, the Double Cluster, open clusters in Auriga and M82 look great. Looking forward to galaxy, globular season and the summer nebula.

 

Options I:

 

I opted for Premium Fullum Mirror, Carbon Fiber tubes, Kendrick secondary dew heater, 1000 Oaks Controller, 40K Encoders, Nexus DSC, Starlight Lightweight Focuser, Battery that fits in base with connectors, and right-angle finder.

 

Options II:

 

Blandin Crossbow EQ Platform
I have set this up in house only at this time and need to practice a few more times to get the procedure down. I can comment on this at a later date.

 

Note #1:

 

 

On DSOs, I use NV intensifier near 100% and for a different scope I use a filter wheel with NV. I want to do the same with the New Moon. To help achieve focus with wheel, Ryan made 4 Sorbothane spacers (spacers move the upper ring assemble closer to the primary). They are very lightweight and do not affect the balance when scope is pointing lower in sky. The spacers are the better option over cutting tubes to shorter length.

 

Conclusion

 

 

The important piece that stands out is I told Ryan what I wanted... he listened and told me what I needed and what he can do to make it a reality. As an engineer, I can draw and /or design anything but someone has to make it.

 

The entire process in acquiring the scope was rather painless. I drove down, got a tour of shop and discussed what I had in mind. Ryan made a few suggestions (I took notes) then drove home and thought it out for a few days and talked out a few points with Ryan. I ordered the scope and some emails and calls went back and forth over time and then drove down to test.

 

New Moon Telescopes: I wouldn't hesitate to buy the scope over again.

Attached Thumbnails

  • NMT_1.JPG
  • NMT_3A.JPG
  • NMT_4.JPG
  • NMT_6.JPG
  • NMT_7.JPG
  • NMT_8.JPG
  • NMT_9A.JPG
  • NMT_11.JPG

  • Bill Jensen, zjc26138, Steve D. and 10 others like this

#2 coopman

coopman

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,433
  • Joined: 23 Apr 2006
  • Loc: South Louisiana

Posted 23 February 2020 - 05:57 PM

Looks very nice. Congrats.

#3 starzonesteve

starzonesteve

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 699
  • Joined: 17 May 2014
  • Loc: Central Alabama

Posted 23 February 2020 - 06:04 PM

Congratulations that is a nice looking set up you have got. Would love to hear about an observing report with it at some point.



#4 John Miele

John Miele

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,000
  • Joined: 29 May 2005
  • Loc: North Alabama

Posted 23 February 2020 - 06:10 PM

I love the design of those side bearings...very cool!



#5 a__l

a__l

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,016
  • Joined: 24 Nov 2007

Posted 23 February 2020 - 06:42 PM

== Of all DSOs that are visible in winter, M42 is the most spectacular. With NV it is simply fantastic. The New Moon (with NV) allows M42 and other emission nebula such as the Flame, Bubble and Pacman to show off.

== On star stuff, the Double Cluster, open clusters in Auriga and M82 look great. Looking forward to galaxy, globular season and the summer nebula.

 

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=b_pCeia7XkA

 

Of course, this is a matter of preference.
In my opinion, globular clusters look much more elegant under a dark sky with TV eyepieces.


  • Dougeo likes this

#6 Blueox4

Blueox4

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 631
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2015
  • Loc: Upstate New York

Posted 23 February 2020 - 06:52 PM

Congratulations on a beautiful telescope! Looking forward to an observing report. 



#7 Mazerski

Mazerski

    Messenger

  • ****-
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 416
  • Joined: 13 Nov 2013

Posted 23 February 2020 - 07:17 PM

It is a nice scope - thanks. The best thing for me really is moving it inn/ out fully assembled.

 

Observing report — I never take notes for whatever reason. 

A couple weeks ago I did get a 15 minute view of 60% moon (my house got in the way) and that was a real treat. As much as I like zooming in, the moon looks better in view framed in black. After this we had a week of truly crummy weather. 

 

As for globs... I have an east coast sky and night vision saved astronomy for me. During glob season (with other scope) I use a glass EP then NV — with glass, M13, M22 are on the bright side but most are dim. With night vision... holy cow, the view is amazing. If I were in a dark sky, the story would be different. Looking forward to glob season.
 

 

 

 



#8 vkhastro1

vkhastro1

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,318
  • Joined: 21 Aug 2005
  • Loc: Vankleek Hill, Ontario, Canada

Posted 23 February 2020 - 08:03 PM

Awesome looking scope.

You will love the Fullum optics !



#9 Dougeo

Dougeo

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 314
  • Joined: 21 Dec 2017
  • Loc: Apache Junction, AZ

Posted 23 February 2020 - 08:34 PM

Beautiful telescope, I wish you many years of enjoyment waytogo.gif



#10 Magnitude7

Magnitude7

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 514
  • Joined: 10 Oct 2010

Posted 23 February 2020 - 10:06 PM

Wow, awesome telescope.

 

The amount of required engineering, knowledge, and workmanship is staggering. 

Ryan sure knows how to make a telescope.



#11 Allan Wade

Allan Wade

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,644
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2013
  • Loc: Newcastle, Australia

Posted 24 February 2020 - 12:50 AM

You must be thrilled with your new dob. It looks like a fantastic machine. I always thought, once you get to 12" and some decent sky, serious deep sky observing is within your grasp.

 

I think wheelbarrow handles are a must for dobs over 10". My 16" is a joy to setup because of them. So quick and easy. By contrast, my old 12" Orion dob was quite the effort considering I had to carry the base then tube out in separate trips, and they were each very heavy. I'm a big fan of the work smart, not hard principle.



#12 Allan Wade

Allan Wade

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,644
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2013
  • Loc: Newcastle, Australia

Posted 24 February 2020 - 01:00 AM

I use that Thousand Oaks dew controller on my dobs. I found the green power led to be amazingly bright, so I opened the box up and snipped the led wire to turn it off. It's a nice free upgrade for your dob.



#13 spencerj

spencerj

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,812
  • Joined: 17 Nov 2004
  • Loc: Londonderry, NH

Posted 24 February 2020 - 10:14 AM

Awesome looking scope.

You will love the Fullum optics !

+1

 

I have had my 12.5" NMT for over a year and the scope has been great.  When I ordered the Fullum mirror, I was expecting a great mirror, but it has exceeded my expectations.  It is just fantastic.  Very smooth surface.  Very sharp images.  Cools down well.  One of the best decisions I made when ordering the scope.  


  • stubeeef likes this

#14 Blueox4

Blueox4

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 631
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2015
  • Loc: Upstate New York

Posted 24 February 2020 - 11:35 AM

It’s nice to hear such good things about the Fullum mirrors. I’m on the list for a 16” from Ryan and it will have the fused Fullum mirror. These will be fused from extra glass left over from his larger mirrors according to Ryan. Very exciting seeing your beautiful telescope and reading the great reports on the Fullum mirrors! 


  • Tyson M likes this

#15 Mazerski

Mazerski

    Messenger

  • ****-
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 416
  • Joined: 13 Nov 2013

Posted 24 February 2020 - 12:31 PM

Unfortunately since picking up the scope, I had to fly out west, and the mid-Atlantic weather has over been rather crummy. I’ve taken it out 4 or 5 times. Star hoping like back in the old days is long over in this part of the US. If I can count 30 stars on a clear cold night, I’d say it’s a good night.

Seems odd for me to say it’s dark at my house but the sky is bright.

 

As for the LEDs on the 1000 Oaks Controller, I don’t even notice them. I have looked a few times to make sure they are on as a battery in the base box with clips is new to me and just periodically making sure the connection is still solid.

 

WB handles... Yep, in/out fully assembled is the best thing ever. With the Crossbow, I’ll have to figure out how best to do this but for DSOs, tracking is not critical to me as it’s usually one or two looking. A crowd is a different story. For moon and planets tracking is a must.


  • Blueox4 likes this

#16 Starman1

Starman1

    Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 46,686
  • Joined: 23 Jun 2003
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 27 February 2020 - 03:20 PM

I use that Thousand Oaks dew controller on my dobs. I found the green power led to be amazingly bright, so I opened the box up and snipped the led wire to turn it off. It's a nice free upgrade for your dob.

I just covered all the LEDs with black gaffer's tape.

I really don't know why astronomy accessories have "on lights".

If the devices plugged in work, it's on.

My fan switches had operating LEDs as well.  Dumb.  If the fans are on, the switch is on.

I don't need a light-polluting LED to tell me that.


  • RubyCruxis likes this

#17 stubeeef

stubeeef

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 766
  • Joined: 06 Aug 2012
  • Loc: NW NC

Posted 27 February 2020 - 03:30 PM

Congrats! Beautiful scope, what we all hope for and expect from Ryan.

 

The best scope is one you will use, and glad you focused on doing just that. I'm jealous.



#18 tommm

tommm

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 744
  • Joined: 16 Dec 2015

Posted 28 February 2020 - 11:08 AM

I just covered all the LEDs with black gaffer's tape.

I really don't know why astronomy accessories have "on lights".

If the devices plugged in work, it's on.

My fan switches had operating LEDs as well.  Dumb.  If the fans are on, the switch is on.

I don't need a light-polluting LED to tell me that.

Don,

If your hearing is as good as your eyesight I can see why you would say that, but I can't hear my Noctua fan when it is running so it is good to have something to remind me to turn it off at the end of the night. Same for my drive electronics.  I have those switches that have a built-in red LED. They aren't that bright, and I can't see them from the UTA end of the scope where I usually am. Oh, I can't see the fan either, it has a fine mesh dust screen behind it.

 

OP,

Beautiful scope and sounds like great optics! May you enjoy it for many years!  That's sweet being able to just roll out the assembled scope with collimation almost spot on from the get go. Low activation energy required to use it.


Edited by tommm, 28 February 2020 - 11:17 AM.


#19 Starman1

Starman1

    Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 46,686
  • Joined: 23 Jun 2003
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 28 February 2020 - 12:49 PM

Yeah, I can hear my fans 50 feet away, even though they're "silent", non-vibrating, fans.

When they're running, they're invisible and behind a metal grid for protection of fingers.

I can hear the fans on other scopes near me, too.

I'm constantly telling my wife what people said on a TV movie.

I'm amazed at that.  I went to so many rock concerts when I was younger, I'm surprised I can still hear.lol.gif

I'm probably deaf above 15KHz, like most people my age, but I guess the frequency of fans is still in the audible range.

 

Still it's easy to tell if a fan is on by shining a red LED light on it.  No reason to have a bright red "operating" LED that illuminates the ground for 6'.

 

Here's another similar question:

As one "shining" example, the Celestron CPC telescopes have a bright red LED on the on/off switch that faces the observer.

When the telescope is on, the hand controller lights up.  Why is there a red LED on the on/off switch?

 

Re: Allan's comments on the Thousand Oaks controller box: THANKS for the tip.


  • Miranda2525 likes this

#20 waynel

waynel

    Explorer 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 62
  • Joined: 15 Dec 2006

Posted 30 April 2020 - 05:28 PM

From another thread : "If you do consider NV, I suggest telling Ryan up front."

 

can you explain why?

 

Thanks

Wayne



#21 Mazerski

Mazerski

    Messenger

  • ****-
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 416
  • Joined: 13 Nov 2013

Posted 30 April 2020 - 10:01 PM

 Wayne,

 

If your need technical details like back focus in mm, focal planes, etc, contact a user named Eddgie as he is very knowledgeable on this sort of thing.

 

The light path in NV vs. glass EP is not the same and more in-focus is required. For instance, if you have an Obsession Classic, the AB NightVision Mod3 (c-Mount version) will not focus but there is a solution (I can post with photos if you need it). The PVS7 night vision device does focus.

 

Anyway, I use a filter wheel at times (NV requires filters but a filter wheel is not required) and Ryan estimated on how much to shorten the truss poles... I gave Ryan NV nosepiece measurements and a friend of his (The Ardent, uses NV and Ryan made him a scope so Ryan may have consulted Ardent...)

 

1st photo = right-to-left: PVS7 body, stepped c-mount nosepiece, ring adapter (c-mount) to 5 position, 1.25" filter wheel, T2 / 2" adapter to MPCC with spacer for focus.

 

2nd photo = Mod3 device + ScopeStuff c-mount to 1.25" nosepiece adapter + Baader IR filter. This configuration can slide into scope focuser. ScopeStuff also makes 2" adapters such that you can use 1.25" filter or 2" filter and can screw on 2" focal reducer.

 

Note #1: The way Ryan makes the hybrid scope, the upper ring with focuser, secondary and finder can move up or down. The scope "as-is" focused with night vision device as in photo #2. To get devices to focus with filter wheel and 2" 0.7x and 0.5x focal reducers, Ryan cut Sorbothane spacers to lower the upper ring (closer to primary) such that they focus. 

 

Note #2: With spacers used, I believe an extension tube is needed for a glass eyepiece - I'll double check on moon, Venus and later on the other planets

 

All that to say I don't trust myself to cut truss tubes and in this scope, the tubes are carbon fiber and the assembly is complex, especially compared to an Obsession Classic.

Attached Thumbnails

  • FW1.JPG
  • Mod3.JPG
  • S1.JPG

  • waynel likes this

#22 waynel

waynel

    Explorer 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 62
  • Joined: 15 Dec 2006

Posted 02 May 2020 - 03:49 PM

Thanks for the reply.  I have a new moon 12.5” F5 hybrid shipping to me.  Was not planning NV right away but it’s  something that I might add eventually.  Two questions given that I know nothing about NV :

 

1) when using night vision do you use an eyepiece too?  Otherwise how is the magnification selected.

2) Roughly what would it cost to add NV to this scope buying new?

 

Thanks
Wayne 



#23 Mazerski

Mazerski

    Messenger

  • ****-
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 416
  • Joined: 13 Nov 2013

Posted 02 May 2020 - 08:15 PM

You’re welcome.

 

NV: in my reply above this, the first photo shows a PVS-7 (goggle) and in 2nd photo that is a Mod3 (monocular) — the eyepiece is part of device... the Mod3 has a 26mm EP built in and the PVS-7 — I’m not sure how it works since the light beam is split but the magnification is a bit more than in monocular. To use the devices as shown in photos - filter wheel or with an adapter that slides in focuser is called Prime Viewing. 
 

TeleVue makes a ring adapter that has one side tighten to specific TV Eyepieces while the other side screws into the NV device. This type of viewing is called Afocal (I haven’t used this setup yet). 
 

Cost: varies and depends on the intensifier tube specifications... the Mod3 (C-Mount version is a must due to flexibility / variety of ways it can be used) run (current) about $4200 and the Astro version is near $5000. The PVS7 is harder to come by now (good spec tube for astronomy) but not sure why.  Both of my units are White Phosphor (grey to black / white but can look bluish under a dark sky) — the footage of military on tee vee is Green Phosphor.

Ask more Qs if you like.

 

Lot of good info here:  on this page there is a Best of NV topic. 

 

https://www.cloudyni...d-night-vision/
 

 


  • waynel likes this

#24 a__l

a__l

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,016
  • Joined: 24 Nov 2007

Posted 02 May 2020 - 08:29 PM

or with an adapter that slides in focuser is called Prime Viewing. 

 

 

In this mode, you can use Paracorr-1 (removing its rotating head). The distance from the edge of P1 to the sensor should be ~ 18mm. You have parts (battery cover and toggle switch). Do they allow you to withstand a distance of 18 mm?
(P2 is difficult to use in this case, serious improvements are needed).



#25 Mazerski

Mazerski

    Messenger

  • ****-
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 416
  • Joined: 13 Nov 2013

Posted 02 May 2020 - 09:02 PM

a_____
 

I don’t own a Paracorr of any type and have never used it so I cannot answer your question.
One of the night vision experts might know answer? 




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: dob, collimation, equipment, observing report, reflector, NV



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics