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Biggest benefit to NV?

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#26 star drop

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Posted 28 February 2020 - 10:03 AM

I just remembered something from my distant past. Army surplus stores. I wonder if any of them have inexpensive NV gear?


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#27 GOLGO13

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Posted 15 March 2020 - 03:23 PM

Agreed.

 

NV certainly gives one a new respect for and perspective regarding the Milky Way.

 

Although the Orion Nebula gets all the press because of its brightness, with NV one soon discovers that M-42 is far from the largest.

 

Bob

Cygnus is a pretty neat area at 1x


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#28 Jeff Morgan

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 02:13 PM

Cygnus is a pretty neat area at 1x

 

With NV Cygnus becomes one the best constellations in the sky! The only thing missing are Globular Clusters.


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#29 PEterW

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 02:22 PM

Cepheus ain’t too shabby, nor is Orion either...

Peter
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#30 bobhen

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 02:52 PM

Cygnus with its end-to-end nebula and Sagittarius with the big four nebula, lots of globular clusters and thick clouds of dark nebula get my vote – but they are all good with NV.

 

Bob


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#31 Jeff Morgan

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 05:04 PM

Cygnus with its end-to-end nebula and Sagittarius with the big four nebula, lots of globular clusters and thick clouds of dark nebula get my vote – but they are all good with NV.

 

Bob

 

lol.gif Hard to find clear black sky in Cygnus!

 

Visually much of Cygnus looks like this unguided short photo centered on Siemis 57 (aka the Propeller Nebula).

 

Simeis 57 Propeller Nebula.jpg
 
As fun as the Propeller is, notice all of the Mare's Tail (feathering). All apparent with direct vision, even through the small aperture of a 300mm telephoto lens.
 
This summer one of my goals is to get out more to the dark site. I live due north of town, and looking back to the the deep south the sky is deeply diminished, SQM 19.5 or so.

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#32 GrahamDFyffe

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 07:28 PM

Jeff - I live north of town also but at least I have Mesa that blocks the worst of the town lights. I have more problems with neighbors lights than anything else.

 

PS Can't wait until my Mod 3 arrives (probably a month yet)

 

PPS - under excellent conditions I can see the North American and Eastern veil unassisted in my 100mm BTs. Can't imagine what it will be like with NV



#33 GeezerGazer

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 11:31 PM

I just remembered something from my distant past. Army surplus stores. I wonder if any of them have inexpensive NV gear?

I've never seen an NVD at a surplus store, but it's been over a year since I visited one (ours burned to the ground about a year ago).  They do appear in web based classifieds and on fleabay.  The AB Micro I recently assembled works very nicely.  Assembly you say?  I bought the housing new with the ocular already screwed onto one end.  I bought a used tube from another NVer.  I bought a new C-mount 50mm objective lens and screwed it on.  When the tube arrived, I carefully unscrewed the ocular, slid in the used tube, screwed the ocular back on, then put in a battery.  Nothing difficult or technical and there are YouTubes to demonstrate how easy it is.  Total cost of the above was $1525.  The image it provides is very close to what my $4000 Mod 3C shows me.  The point is that there definitely ARE ways to get into NV with much less than the newest, greatest and best.  Three observers (including me) have described the the differences between my two NVDs as subtle.  

 

Best benefit of NV?  Seeing more... anytime.  With a scope or without.  With a filter or without.

 

It is true that I can see better from home with NV, but NV has inspired me to get to a dark site more often than I ever did before NV.  Everything astronomy is ALWAYS better from a dark site... including NV.  And I have to admit, I never dreamt of doing AP, but taking my smartphone NV images has been really rewarding.  smile.gif  BUT, putting these two different NVDs together for a 2x binocular view may bring me back to more visual use of the NVDs.  


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#34 a__l

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 12:22 AM

Question by Envis. It’s with difficulty to buy.

Has anyone looked at other lenses that possibly were better on the edge (for afocal)? The adapter does not matter. This can be made.


Edited by a__l, 17 March 2020 - 04:44 AM.


#35 bobhen

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 06:33 AM

 

PPS - under excellent conditions I can see the North American and Eastern veil unassisted in my 100mm BTs. Can't imagine what it will be like with NV

Neighbor’s lights won’t be a problem. You don’t need dark adaptation with NV. Just keep the lights from shinning directly into the telescope.

 

With NV you will see the Eastern, Western AND the center section (Pickering's Triangle) of the Veil Nebula. If I can see it from my location with a 102mm refractor, you should have no problem.

 

Bob



#36 outofsight

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 10:43 AM

I've never seen an NVD at a surplus store, but it's been over a year since I visited one (ours burned to the ground about a year ago).  They do appear in web based classifieds and on fleabay.  The AB Micro I recently assembled works very nicely.  Assembly you say?  I bought the housing new with the ocular already screwed onto one end.  I bought a used tube from another NVer.  I bought a new C-mount 50mm objective lens and screwed it on.  When the tube arrived, I carefully unscrewed the ocular, slid in the used tube, screwed the ocular back on, then put in a battery.  Nothing difficult or technical and there are YouTubes to demonstrate how easy it is.  Total cost of the above was $1525.  The image it provides is very close to what my $4000 Mod 3C shows me.  The point is that there definitely ARE ways to get into NV with much less than the newest, greatest and best.  Three observers (including me) have described the the differences between my two NVDs as subtle.

This is where research and understanding comes in. These devices may seem intimidating at first, but they are actually very easy to deal with, and it's fairly easy to put together good working units. I've put two PVS-7s together from eBay stuff, and might be making a third one, soon. Good stuff can be done for much less than these $3K to $4K prices, but for someone who wants to spend that much you can easily get top notch NVDs that don't require anything else but using them. And, as you said,

 

"Best benefit of NV?  Seeing more... anytime.  With a scope or without.  With a filter or without."

 

It doesn't get much better, or simpler, than that.


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#37 Dale Eason

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 11:58 AM

Neighbor’s lights won’t be a problem. You don’t need dark adaptation with NV. Just keep the lights from shinning directly into the telescope.

 

With NV you will see the Eastern, Western AND the center section (Pickering's Triangle) of the Veil Nebula. If I can see it from my location with a 102mm refractor, you should have no problem.

 

Bob

Seeing all of it including the center section hand held in my Bortle 8 sky is what amazed me.  Before NV at dark sites under more power and smaller field of view I got lost as to how each part relates to the other..  Can't wait till I can see it at a dark site with less filtering.

 

Dale


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#38 Jeff Morgan

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Posted 17 March 2020 - 05:13 PM

Jeff - I live north of town also but at least I have Mesa that blocks the worst of the town lights. I have more problems with neighbors lights than anything else.

 

PS Can't wait until my Mod 3 arrives (probably a month yet)

 

PPS - under excellent conditions I can see the North American and Eastern veil unassisted in my 100mm BTs. Can't imagine what it will be like with NV

 

Can you do additional landscaping in your yard?

 

In our climate Japanese Honeysuckle keeps it leaves year-round. It is a fast growing vine and makes an excellent light screen. Smells nice too. I use it to block my neighbors insecurity lights.

 

North American? Easy and bright. Ditto for the Pelican. And it has the added advantage of really looking like a Pelican.  The arc of nebulosity immediately south, IC 5068 will also be visible, plainly. Don't worry, you will get used to direct vision.

 

The really fun part will be finding large and bright nebula not on common visual atlases, like nearby Sharpless 2-119.

 

https://www.cloudyni...very/?p=7550775

 

You'll want to get a better atlas for NV. Charles Bracken's "The Astrophotography Sky Atlas" is an excellent value at about $30.


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#39 jdbastro

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Posted 18 March 2020 - 12:09 AM

.....

 

You'll want to get a better atlas for NV. Charles Bracken's "The Astrophotography Sky Atlas" is an excellent value at about $30.

Just checked this out on Amazon.  Looks pretty good, so I ordered a copy.  Thanks.


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#40 GeezerGazer

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Posted 18 March 2020 - 03:20 PM

I too use the Bracken AP Atlas... I tend to switch between the S&T Pocket Sky Atlas and the Bracken to select or find new H-a and Barnard subjects.  I find both to be very helpful.  The indexes of each atlas are different; but useful in different ways too.


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#41 Mark Strollo

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 03:06 PM

Ordered a copy today, also. 
Thanks for the suggestion. 


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#42 GeezerGazer

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 06:29 PM

Ordered a copy today, also. 
Thanks for the suggestion. 

 

Excellent!  And, welcome to the forum!  



#43 careysub

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 10:11 PM

... except on certain objects. Such as the Orion Nebula looks better than many EAA photos.

DOesn't though? I have been spending some good time exploring all the nebulosities of the Orion Complex with the Mod 3, seeing thing I had only seen in pictures before. And M42/M43 was really the best I have ever seen them -- the region around the Trapezium looking like a cyclonic storm, M43 looking three dimensional.

 

Through the OIII filter, no NV, M42 looks graceful and soft, it has well defined structure with NV.


Edited by careysub, 21 March 2020 - 09:02 PM.

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#44 careysub

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Posted 21 March 2020 - 09:01 PM

With NV Cygnus becomes one the best constellations in the sky! The only thing missing are Globular Clusters.

 

Even before NV, when I put O-III filters in front of binoculars at a dark sky site I found the whole Cygnus region was overwhelmed by nebulosities.




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