Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Imaging with the ZWO ASI290MM Mini using Bresser exos-2 goto mount

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Desc82

Desc82

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 22
  • Joined: 19 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Mont-Saint-Hilaire, Québec

Posted 24 February 2020 - 09:57 PM

Hi all,

 

New to astro imaging (actually trying to figure things out). I have read on the topic, so I know about the guide scope-guide camera-main scope-main camera thing.

 

I have a Bresser exos 2 goto mount, which I bought recently (used). It has an ST4 guiding port.

 

Then I found this camera (ZWO ASI290MM Mini)

https://astronomy-im...290mm-mini-mono

 

It is apparently good for both guiding and planetary imaging. My question is the following: Would I be ok to image a planet (using main scope) while guiding using the ST4 function? In other words, imaging and guiding with the same camera without using a secondary off axis scope?

 

Also would it be possible for me to see the image live on a laptop screen while imaging?

 

I tried to find these info by looking to the user manuals, apparently these manuals are made for people who are supposed to know everything.

 

Any help would be appreciated.



#2 bdyer22

bdyer22

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 408
  • Joined: 09 May 2015

Posted 24 February 2020 - 10:04 PM

I've not used it, but It looks like you can - using Sharpcap.

 

read feature tracking section...

https://www.sharpcap...pro/sharpcappro

 

hope that helps


  • Desc82 likes this

#3 Desc82

Desc82

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 22
  • Joined: 19 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Mont-Saint-Hilaire, Québec

Posted 24 February 2020 - 10:19 PM

I've not used it, but It looks like you can - using Sharpcap.

 

read feature tracking section...

https://www.sharpcap...pro/sharpcappro

 

hope that helps

Thank you for sharing. So I understand that SharpCap software would receive the imaging signal from the camera, process the image in real time and send instructions back to the camera (and the mount via ST4) for accurate tracking of the target? That sounds awesome to me if that is the case!



#4 ThatsMyCoffee

ThatsMyCoffee

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 489
  • Joined: 15 Dec 2017
  • Loc: Czech Republic

Posted 25 February 2020 - 04:54 AM

I don't think it's possible with stars and planets moving at different speeds.

 

Most people shoot video or at least several frames per second for planetary work.  No guiding necessary with exposures that short.

 

As a former Exos2 owner, I would regret it if I didn't suggest you return it if that is still possible.  They seem like a great deal.  They're usually not.  You'll have a lot of troubles with longer exposures.  Fine for planetary though...  Best of luck.  My fingers are crossed that you got a good one.


  • Desc82 likes this

#5 Desc82

Desc82

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 22
  • Joined: 19 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Mont-Saint-Hilaire, Québec

Posted 25 February 2020 - 07:09 AM

I don't think it's possible with stars and planets moving at different speeds.

 

Most people shoot video or at least several frames per second for planetary work.  No guiding necessary with exposures that short.

 

As a former Exos2 owner, I would regret it if I didn't suggest you return it if that is still possible.  They seem like a great deal.  They're usually not.  You'll have a lot of troubles with longer exposures.  Fine for planetary though...  Best of luck.  My fingers are crossed that you got a good one.

It is essentially for planetary work. When I bought the mount (for very cheap believe me) my intention was to do only visual observing. It is my first motorized mount I didn't want to spend a lot. In my light polluted area (red zone) I think I wouldn't have good results on DSOs anyway. So good to know I don't need camera guiding for my needs.
 



#6 Jerry Hubbell

Jerry Hubbell

    Vendor-Explore Scientific

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 581
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Locust Grove, VA, USA

Posted 27 February 2020 - 08:07 AM

It is essentially for planetary work. When I bought the mount (for very cheap believe me) my intention was to do only visual observing. It is my first motorized mount I didn't want to spend a lot. In my light polluted area (red zone) I think I wouldn't have good results on DSOs anyway. So good to know I don't need camera guiding for my needs.
 

For planetary work, you do not need, or really want to auto-guide. As was mentioned, planetary lunar imaging is done with video since the moon and planets are much brighter than deep sky objects.

 

For best results (highest resolution) you would want to shoot at a focal ration of f/15 to f/25 depending on your local seeing.Typically, a video frame rate of at least 30 fps up to 100 fps is set and you should start out acquiring 1000 to 2000 frames (about 30 seconds of video). To make sure the planet or portion of the lunar surface stays on the chip area, you would want a very good physical polar alignment of your mount.  Once you have acquired your videos, you can use a video stacking program like Registax 6, or Autostakkert, to compile the video into a single frame, and then use wavelet filtering to bring out all the cool detail in the image.

 

This is the process in general, but there are some adjustments you can make to get the best out of your specific system.

 

You can find a lot of videos on YouTube about the process.


Edited by Jerry Hubbell, 27 February 2020 - 08:08 AM.

  • Francopoli and Desc82 like this

#7 Desc82

Desc82

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 22
  • Joined: 19 Jan 2020
  • Loc: Mont-Saint-Hilaire, Québec

Posted 01 March 2020 - 09:55 AM

For planetary work, you do not need, or really want to auto-guide. As was mentioned, planetary lunar imaging is done with video since the moon and planets are much brighter than deep sky objects.

 

For best results (highest resolution) you would want to shoot at a focal ration of f/15 to f/25 depending on your local seeing.Typically, a video frame rate of at least 30 fps up to 100 fps is set and you should start out acquiring 1000 to 2000 frames (about 30 seconds of video). To make sure the planet or portion of the lunar surface stays on the chip area, you would want a very good physical polar alignment of your mount.  Once you have acquired your videos, you can use a video stacking program like Registax 6, or Autostakkert, to compile the video into a single frame, and then use wavelet filtering to bring out all the cool detail in the image.

 

This is the process in general, but there are some adjustments you can make to get the best out of your specific system.

 

You can find a lot of videos on YouTube about the process.

Hello Jerry, thanks a lot for your feedback. Glad to see I wouldn't need auto guiding for planetary imaging (better for my wallet). I very recently bought a mak 180 and that is within the focal ratio range you mentioned. So it just work just fine (as long as alignment is well done as you said).


  • Jerry Hubbell likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics