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The Cleanstoration of a Mizar SP-68R (68/1000mm)

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#1 Kasmos

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Posted 28 February 2020 - 05:09 AM

I call this a Cleanstoration since when I think of a restoration, I think in terms of vehicle restoration where it usually involves the complete stripping of all finishes, then repainting, and re-plating all trim and hardware. In this scopes case, the goal isn't for perfection. Rather to bring it back to a conditon that one might expect a well kept 30 to 35 year old telescope scope might look like. It is also a challenge to myself to see what I can get away with in terms of leaving it as original as I can plus re-using all the original hardware that can be saved. In someways, doing and spending as little as possible. 

 

I'll start with a posting a review of the scope as found. Then each following post will show how things progress.

 

BTW, Here's how the ad described the scope: 

Working Condition, Wooden Tripods, Various Lenses, Rust & Scratches. The last one sumed it up fairly well.

 

Mizar 1.jpg

The photos actually make it look better than it is.

It's actually the dirtiest, most scratched and rusty telescope I've ever bought.

 

Finder-2.jpg

Nice finder.

 

Finder-front.jpg

Spoke too soon.

Delaminating lens with chipped and cracked cell.

Finder.jpg

 

Lens-Cap.jpg

 

Objective.jpg

Objective looks OK. Just dust and dirt.

 

Tube-Scratches.jpg

It's hard to get the photographs to show the many scratches, scuffs, and scrapes,

but no dings or dents!


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#2 Piggyback

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Posted 28 February 2020 - 05:35 AM

I'm sure, she'll clean up nicely. Looks like car polish will make short work of tube scratching.

Great scope! Only very few Mizars on my side of the pond. waytogo.gif


Edited by Piggyback, 28 February 2020 - 05:36 AM.


#3 Kasmos

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Posted 28 February 2020 - 05:38 AM

Focuser.jpg

Again, it doesn't look too bad in the photos,

but a close inspection shows that most of the hardware is either a dull greenish color, pitted, or brown and rusty.

 

Mizar-SP-Mount-2.jpg

 

Mount-Hub.jpg

 

Mount-up.jpg

 

Mount-3.jpg

 

Counter-Weight-S.jpg

 

Leg.jpg

The scope may have spent an extended time outside. I'm not certain if that accounts for the rust, 

or because it was found in a nearby beach city.


Edited by Kasmos, 28 February 2020 - 05:39 AM.

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#4 Kasmos

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Posted 28 February 2020 - 05:42 AM

I'm sure, she'll clean up nicely. Looks like car polish will make short work of tube scratching.

Great scope! Only very few Mizars on my side of the pond. waytogo.gif

Many of them will polish out but quite a few like that big spot are though the paint.


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#5 Kasmos

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Posted 29 February 2020 - 04:54 AM

First up is repairing the finder's objective cell.

01 Finder-Cell-Chip.jpg

Not only was it badly chipped but also cracked.

 

02 Finder-Cell-Crack.jpg

I opened the crack with a toothpick and applied Super Glue.

 

03 Finder-Cell-Tape-Dam.jpg

Since it doesn't stick to tape I created a dam and filled it with JB Weld

 

04 Finder-Cell-JB.jpg

When the tape was removed I notice it still had some voids. A bit at one edge and down inside.

 

05 Finder-Cell-JB2.jpg

After sanding it smooth I dabbed on more to fill the missed voids.

 

06 Finder-Cell-Prep.jpg

Sanded and ready for paint. (the threads were taped off before painting). 

 

07 Finder-Cell-Paint.jpg

It turned out good but I made a mistake that others might relate to.

 

I have a bunch of different brands and sheens of partially used black spray paint on a shelf. 

I grabbed a can that was up there for who knows how long but it seemed to have more than enough for such a tiny part.

Soon after the first pass the nozzle clogged and it stopped all together. I stuck in another noozle and it happened again.

Grabed another can (a different brand), worried that it would craze. It went on OK and looked OK, but it was satin.

The cell was glossy plastic and and I wanted it to appear like it had not been repaired. (sometimes I get too hung up).

Within a few minutes, I sprayed over it with a gloss so I wouldn't have to wait days, but the top coat dulled as it tacked up.

After a couple of days it was sanded and reshot with a fresher pre-tested can of gloss. whew.gif


Edited by Kasmos, 29 February 2020 - 02:22 PM.

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#6 Bomber Bob

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Posted 29 February 2020 - 08:05 AM

I didn't know that about JB Weld.  Got some gouged castings that need repair, and put them off thinking I needed a "form" around them -- great to learn that the blue tape will work!

 

Great start on your restoration Chris!  I'll be following along, admiring your work, and learning, too.  Can't beat that.


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#7 Kasmos

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Posted 29 February 2020 - 01:33 PM

I didn't know that about JB Weld.  Got some gouged castings that need repair, and put them off thinking I needed a "form" around them -- great to learn that the blue tape will work!

 

Great start on your restoration Chris!  I'll be following along, admiring your work, and learning, too.  Can't beat that.

Thanks. I learned it didn't stick just by trying it on another project. At that time I thought I might have to sand it off. Later someone mentioned it on this site. One thing I should have pointed out. To make the dam/form firm I usually put two or three layers of tape on each side.


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#8 Piggyback

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Posted 01 March 2020 - 02:35 AM

Amazing restoration work, Kasmos!

Contemplating ways to remove a ding in the metal tubing of my 68mm Busch Preisfernrohr. Any suggestions for that?



#9 Kasmos

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Posted 01 March 2020 - 04:16 AM

Amazing restoration work, Kasmos!

Contemplating ways to remove a ding in the metal tubing of my 68mm Busch Preisfernrohr. Any suggestions for that?

Thanks!

I did a topic on dents on tubes and dew shields awhile ago.

 

Here's the link to it:

 

https://www.cloudyni...t-removal-tips/

 

Depending on the ding, putting pressure on it like demonstrated in the first post might fix it.


Edited by Kasmos, 01 March 2020 - 04:40 AM.

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#10 Kasmos

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Posted 02 March 2020 - 02:03 AM

Continued finder work.

 

First I made a sketch laying out the order of the eye piece elements.

Finder-EP-Layout.jpg

Considering the condition of the scope it wasn't surprising the crosshairs were broke.

I also had suspected the eyepiece section had been swaped with the the polar sight and later found it to be true.

Cross-Hairs-Broke.jpg

I've repaired some that were disconected like this by grabbing the ends of the hairs with tape or tweezers but failed this time. 

 

Cross-Hairs1.jpg

I tried using some of my wife's hair since it's very fine,

It turned out it was too light (blond), so it didn't look right under magnification.

The other reason I show this attempt is to illustrste how I use a little puddle of super glue for dipping the toothpick.

 

Cross-Hairs2.jpg

The second time I used my own hair.

It shows how I tape the hair down, then repeat it nearer and nearer to the cell increasing the tension as I go. 

Note the verticle hair has been cut. I had to do one of them twice since under magnification they didn't match.

 

Finders-Elements.jpg

These are the eye piece elements from both the finder and the polar alignment scope after clean up.

They had been switched. The polar scope has the cross hair cell with the green filter with a hole at it's center.

For some reason the polar finder also has that little metal piece with a reduced exit hole (to the right), that sticks out of the occular.

I'll have to see if and how it affects viewing the recticle. Perhaps it's meant as a guard?

BTW, when I first tried looking through the finder I found it's little hole had been completely opaqued with a spider's web.  

 

EP-Barrels.jpg

Both barrels were nicked scratched and scrapped

I wet sanded them with 400 then 600 sand paper followed by a polishing with Blue Magic.

In this photo the lower one has yet to be done. It doesn't quite do justice how much better the top one came out.


Edited by Kasmos, 02 March 2020 - 02:05 AM.

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#11 Kasmos

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Posted 03 March 2020 - 04:12 PM

Repairing the Finders Objective

 

Finder-lens-B4.jpg

Here's how the objective appeared. Testing the finder showed that it couldn't be used as is.

Obviously the cement between the elements was failing.

Since the cell was badly damaged, perhaps it's cause might have had something to do with it?

 

Microwaved-Lenses.jpg

To separate cemented lenses someone in the forum once mentioned heating them in a microwave instead of a pot on a stove.

I placed a wadded paper towel in a cup for a cushion, added a little water, and set the lens in.

It's been a while and if my memory is correct and considering it's not very much water, 

I think I heated it 30 seconds, checked it, then probably only another 30. If not, 1 minute 30 seconds at the most.

You can kind of tell how hot it is from the steam and need to be careful as the paper towel will puff up each time it heats up.

Using some paint sticks as tongs I placed them on a towel, nudged them and they easily slid appart.

 

Lens-Split.jpg

Afterwards they were cleaned of the cement with acetone.

They were marked before microwaving, but the acetone removed them a bit, so they were retraced for alignment.

 

Mizar-Finder-Objective.jpg

Some small spacers were made and a small piece of tape was put on its edge to mantain alignment.

Now it's a cute little airspaced objective.

A test look proved it was a success.


Edited by Kasmos, 03 March 2020 - 04:29 PM.

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#12 Kasmos

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Posted 04 March 2020 - 04:10 AM

The Finder completed.

 

Finder-Obj.jpg

 

Finder-EP.jpg

This photo better illustrates how nice the EP barrel polished up.

 

Finder-1.jpg

The tube was cleaned of scuffs with polishing compound and a couple of small scratches were touched up.

There's still a few teeny-tiny specks that are just too small to touch up.

 

Finder-2.jpg

 

Tube-Protectors.jpg

Thanks to Mizar for using these protection collars the tube doesn't have a zillion scratches.

To bad other companies didn't follow suit.


Edited by Kasmos, 04 March 2020 - 05:20 AM.

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#13 BigC

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Posted 04 March 2020 - 11:46 AM

Great timing. My Mizar 68×1000 just arrived yesterday.

Very impressive.

I have thought/wished 70×1000 size was a common offering in "department store" telescopes. At 2.8x5=14 such just meet the better standard of the CA chart yet still not a large or expensive unit.
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#14 Van Do9:3

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Posted 04 March 2020 - 01:55 PM

Repairing the Finders Objective

 

attachicon.gifFinder-lens-B4.jpg

Here's how the objective appeared. Testing the finder showed that it couldn't be used as is.

Obviously the cement between the elements was failing.

Since the cell was badly damaged, perhaps it's cause might have had something to do with it?

 

attachicon.gifMicrowaved-Lenses.jpg

To separate cemented lenses someone in the forum once mentioned heating them in a microwave instead of a pot on a stove.

I placed a wadded paper towel in a cup for a cushion, added a little water, and set the lens in.

It's been a while and if my memory is correct and considering it's not very much water, 

I think I heated it 30 seconds, checked it, then probably only another 30. If not, 1 minute 30 seconds at the most.

You can kind of tell how hot it is from the steam and need to be careful as the paper towel will puff up each time it heats up.

Using some paint sticks as tongs I placed them on a towel, nudged them and they easily slid appart.

 

attachicon.gifLens-Split.jpg

Afterwards they were cleaned of the cement with acetone.

They were marked before microwaving, but the acetone removed them a bit, so they were retraced for alignment.

 

attachicon.gifMizar-Finder-Objective.jpg

Some small spacers were made and a small piece of tape was put on its edge to mantain alignment.

Now it's a cute little airspaced objective.

A test look proved it was a success.

Chris,

 

Great restoration progress. To delaminate a balsam cemented lens, I used the oven method that Scott posted and used chop sticks (not in short supply at our house) to maneuver the hot lenses. 
 

How did you determine the thickness of the spacers, and is that thickness ubiquitous for all objective lens, air spaced or cemented?

 

Thank you,

 

My 



#15 Kasmos

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Posted 04 March 2020 - 02:21 PM

Chris,

 

Great restoration progress. To delaminate a balsam cemented lens, I used the oven method that Scott posted and used chop sticks (not in short supply at our house) to maneuver the hot lenses. 
 

How did you determine the thickness of the spacers, and is that thickness ubiquitous for all objective lens, air spaced or cemented?

 

Thank you,

 

My 

Thank you.

 

The gap that the cement made between the lenses seemed very narrow so I just used the the thin spacer material that I already had on hand (graciously supplied by fellow member rcwolopert) I believe it's .003" which is very common.

 

I've found that most finders aren't that perfect optically (stars aren't usually perfect pin points) anyway, so I don't know how much difference it would make compared to if it had still been a cemented lens, plus I believe optimal spacing mostly effects the color.


Edited by Kasmos, 04 March 2020 - 02:24 PM.

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#16 Kasmos

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Posted 10 March 2020 - 07:35 PM

On to the OTA and it's touch ups.

 

First I have to say that I had no idea how this would go and had some real reservations about doing it.

Now that it's been done here's some explainations and advice if you decide to try it.

 

To remove the many superficial scrapes and scuffs a good polishing was done with rubbing compound.

That was followed by a wipe down with Awesome

 

The first mistake, since they were very fine brushes I used some really old ones .

The problem was they had lost their spring making them not release their paint well, especially when using very small amounts of paint.

Secondly, use two coats and be patient. The first coat the scratch may look grayer as it dries but wait and don't worry.

Using too much paint will make the puddle want to sag to one side when you slightly turn the tube to do the others. 

Fill the scratch to it's edges. If it leaves sort of a little seam, before it completely dries, wet the brush with some very thinned paint and lightly go over just the seam to blend it.

Since they will level out, wait for the touch ups to dry before being discouraged. 

If you make a mistake or don't like a touch up, a quick wipe with lacquer will remove it and shouldn't hurt the original paint.

After my first crack at it, I wasn't happy and wiped all of them just enough to remove some of the paint which sort of left a base coat as a primer.

 

00-OTA-Touch-ups.jpg

The tube is a fairly white white so I used straight Testors gloss white model paint. It's a little whiter than the tube, but ended up looking fine.

I tried to blend it with a creamer white, but when it dried too dark, I had to wipe it off.

For some reason the dew shield is creamer so I did have to blend two whites for it.

I did some limited blending on the OTA but mostly gave up and used the Testors straight.

 

02-Tube-Purp.jpg

This and the photos below are an attempt at accurately illustrating some before and afters.

Therefore, were shot on the same backgrounds with approximately the same lighting conditions.

 

03-Dew-Rt.jpg

 

04-Tube-Lft.jpg

 

05-Tube-Center.jpg

 

06-Tube-Center-2.jpg

 

07-label-Finder.jpg

 

08-Label.jpg

The label was touched up using a xtra fine sharpie.

In the after photo, you can also just make out a couple of the touched up chips on the OTA.

 

01-Touch-Up-Close.jpg

It's really hard to accurately capture both the scratches and the touch ups on a white tube.

Most times photographs will make something look better but sometimes worse.

This was Photoshoped (adjusted), to give a pretty good idication of how they look close up and is approx. to scale.

Some came out better than others and while these appear a little lumpy,  I'm surprised and pleased at just how good the OTA now looks in person.

All in all it gives a very nice overall impression. Perhaps partly because the eye can't focus everywhere at once.

 

Edit: I have yet to examine it in daylight outside, but at 2-3 feet with indoor lighting you don't see them at all. 


Edited by Kasmos, 10 March 2020 - 08:43 PM.

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#17 Kasmos

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Posted 12 March 2020 - 05:11 AM

Touching Up the Tripod Brackets and Tray

 

The goal was to try and avoid stripping and repainting as much as possible.

This was a lot tricker for a few reasons and those reasons almost made me give into stripping and repainting.

 

First problem, touching up anything larger than a small chip was going to be tedious and difficult.

Secondly many of the chips were fairly rusty and or the rust was leaching through the paint.

I decided to give it a try since there was really nothing to lose.

Besides, perfection wasn't the goal, just a better looking scope.

 

Tri-Bars-B4.jpg

The three tripod bars that attach in the center were bent so first needed to be flattened.

You can make out that the bottom two are still wavy in this photo and it was the bend in the bottom one that caused the paint to flake

You can also see that I started experimenting with touching up the chips around the the slotted holes in the top and bottom 2 brackets.

They were installed upide down on the tripod legs so were weathered the most on the side that will face down.

The bottom one shows a slightly rusty patina but I discovered a technique to deal with that.

 

Last summer I was cleaning up an old steel filling cabinet that needed a good cleaning and polishing.

The problem was it had a few areas where it looked like rust stains were coming through the paint.

They wouldn't come out with wax or polishing compound, so on a whim I tried polishing them with Nevr-Dull.

They came out! So I used it on these bars and the rest of the metal parts followed by a wipe down with mineral spirits before painting.

Also, by folding sand paper into kind of a wedge, I carefully sanded and or used Scotchbrite on any rust that was in the chips.

 

By mixing silver and black paint I would first lay down a middle grey tone in the chips and scratches.

Then I'd stipple and squiggle darker and lighter shades trying to match the Hammer Tone patterns.

I have to admitt it became pretty tedious and tiring, but the good results help kept me going.

Tri-Bars-Aft.jpg

They came out pretty good and in use the bottom bracket will be flipped over so it's touch ups won't really ever be seen.

The areas around the slots will be under the tray so in practice the same goes for them.

 

Tray-Top-B4.jpg

Above: The tray's top Before.

It didn't need nearly as much work and just like the brackets, first it was given the same prep treatment.

TrayTop-Aft.jpg

After. since they were so small I didn't bother with every teeny little nick or imperfection.

It just needed a few chips touched up here and there and along it's outer edge/lip.

Also, since the paint was wearing thin in the inner crease, I ran some paint along in it.

 

Tray-Bot-B4.jpg

Before

The bottom won't ever show but was given the same treatment.

 

Tray-Bot-Aft.jpg

After

 

As with the OTA, looking at these parts in person, I'm surprised and pleased how good the touch ups blend in.


Edited by Kasmos, 12 March 2020 - 05:14 AM.

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#18 Kasmos

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Posted 12 March 2020 - 02:37 PM

More Hammer Tone Touch Ups

 

Mizar-Touch-Ups.jpg

Here's the silver and black paints that I mixed to simulate the Hammer Tone.

While it's  slightly warmer in color, it worked well. 

 

Lens-Cap-b4.jpg

Not the best photo, but it shows the rusty chipped edge and some of the rust of the inner face.

 

Lens-Cap-Aft2.jpg

The inner face had quite a bit of rust coming through the paint, so it was completely repainted by hand.

Because it was a larger surface to paint, the dappling and stippling in there isn't quite as fine. 

It was one of the parts that was tempting to completely re-condition and I might at some point.

That said, it looks decent, so as they say, a temporary fix can easilly become a permanent one.

 

Weight-B4.jpg

The Counter Weight was another part that I wasn't sure could be saved.

 

Weight-A1.jpg

 

W-Thumb-Screw.jpg

The thumb screw cleaned up well too!

 

While these parts have some under the paint rust migration in the form of small webbing and bubbling,

with proper care and use I'm sure they'll hold up for quite a few years.


Edited by Kasmos, 12 March 2020 - 09:08 PM.

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#19 Kasmos

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 04:27 AM

Tripod Hardware

 

Most of the tripod hardware was pretty rusty, so I considered replacing all of it with stainless.

But that created a few new issues:

 

1. Locally I couldn't find M8 Metric bolts in the correct length.

2. The Metric hardware I did find was expensive, 2 to 3 times the cost of Standard.

3. Keeping the scope as original as possible.

 

For example, my local hardware store had M8 wing nuts at $4.29 ea.!

The M6 were $3.29. so just the cost for the 12 wingnuts would have been $48.80 (with sales tax),

which is almost what the complete scope cost ($50)

Then even if I could find them, based on close sizes I estimated an additional $25 for the rest of bolts and washers. 

If I choose to use Standard hardware, the cost to replace everything came to a somewhat more reasonanble $35.

Later I checked some of the Metric sizes on McMaster-Car and they appeared to be much better priced.

 

Since the challenge had been to keep the scope as original as possible and since that included the hardware,

I went back to that plan. Also, keeping the total cost of the project low is part of the fun of the challenge.

It's a bit harsh, but some might call it a Miserly Restoration of a Mizar! shocked.gif grin.gif

 

Bolts-2B&A.jpg

Since many vintage scopes have painted wingnuts and washers,

I experimented with painting the bolt heads and wingnuts.

Using new washers and slipping them into the legs,

I tried silver, then black, but since it matches the mount and other brackets,

a darkish metallic gray ended up looking the best.

 

Bolt-Wings-painted-1.jpg

These are the bolts for the top hub and middle tray.

Most of their plating just peeled off so the bolt heads needed to be painted.

Like the touch ups I mixed silver and black and then hand painted them using two light coats.

The tape roughly wrapping them is so they wouldn't roll off the wood stick while they dry.

 

Bolt-Wings-painted2.jpg

Since their heads cleaned up fairly well, only the wingnuts were painted for the lower bolts.

 

ConnectorsB4.jpg

Here's a before shot showing the plastic connectors of the tray brackets.

 

Connectors-2.jpg

And after a good polishing with Blue Magic.

Only one screw was thought to be needed, but later I found one of the others had wrong sized threads. 

Happily they turned out to be stainless so they were given the Blue Magic treatment.

 

Brackets-&-Screw.jpg

The hardware for the circular tray cleaned up OK. The thick washer is threaded and the other is not.

I'm guessing that the thick threaded washer goes directly under the tray,

then the thin washer goes under the brackets followed by the wingnut.

Does anyone know if that's the correct order?

Also, now that they have been retouched, I'd like to come up with some kind of thin washer

or gasket to protect the brackets from chipping each other.

 

There's no more room for additional photos so the next post will be about the washers.

(how exciting!) wink.png  


Edited by Kasmos, 23 March 2020 - 04:49 AM.

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#20 walter a

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 07:41 AM

I have the threaded washer on both of my mounts and I have installed them in the following order.
bolt
washer
tray
threaded washer
spreaderx3
washer
wing nut
Weather this is correct or not I can't say but I think the pupose of the threaded washer when spaced right is to allow the tray to rotate after everything is tight,


Edited by walter a, 23 March 2020 - 07:42 AM.


#21 Kasmos

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 03:21 PM

I have the threaded washer on both of my mounts and I have installed them in the following order.
bolt
washer
tray
threaded washer
spreaderx3
washer
wing nut
Weather this is correct or not I can't say but I think the pupose of the threaded washer when spaced right is to allow the tray to rotate after everything is tight,

My thoughts on it were, The thick treaded washer is possibly intended intended to be a support or standoff between the tray and the brackets, or just to keep the screw in place during the attachment of the 3 brackets.

 

Anyhow, your order is the same of what I was thinking, except that I'm minus the top washer. It might have been lost, and adding one in that position had crossed my mind, so I'll probably add it. 

Thanks!


Edited by Kasmos, 23 March 2020 - 08:27 PM.


#22 Kasmos

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 10:56 PM

Tripod Hardware Continued

 

Washers

 

Painting the bolt heads and wingnuts seemed to be a good and practical solution,

but not neccessarily the best case for the washers since:

 

1. They would probably chip more easily than the other painted hardware.

2. Look dull

 

I knew some contrast between the washers and the bolt heads and wingnuts would look much better.

Therefore, I replaced them with stainless steel washers in the closest size I could find.

I'm really picky with appearances and since the original washers had left indents in the legs,

I needed to modify the replacements for an exact fit and better look.

 

Top-3.jpg

Top left: An example of an original tripod hub washer.

Top right: A 1/4" replacement fender washer that is close in size.

Bottom: The finished replacement with it's diameter reduced and hole reamed.

The hole is slightly smaller since it was only reamed enough to fit the bolt.

 

Drill-Turning.jpg

Once again I used my drill in a vice as a mini lathe and cutting down 12 was a tedious process. 

The washer is held between a counter sunk head screw and nut to keep it centered.

A file is held against it as it spins and then the edges are slightly bevelled.

This is usually followed by running it against a piece of fine sand paper or a smooth sharpening stone.

Then a Scotch Brite pad and some Blue Magic for a finished polish.

 

Washer-Gauging.jpg

It was quite a hassle having to constantly take the washer off to check it's size against an original.

I then realized that a drafting circle template could be used as a rough gauge.

It saved a lot of time since it could easily be held up to or slipped over the washer while it's still on the drill.

 

Washers-Top.jpg

I did a few at a time so getting these 6 top washers done was a relief.

The next 6 for the tray brackets would be a bit easier since they wouldn't need reaming

 

Washers-Mid-Com.jpg

Here's an unworked replacement tray bracket washer, a finished one, and an original.

The hole is slightly larger than the originals but not enough to matter.

 

Middle-Washers.jpg

A comparison of the finished tray bracket replacement washers with the originals.

 

Bottom-Washers.jpg

The bottom leg adjustment washers polished up fairly well, but since then I purchased

some 1/4" stainless washers that, while a little thicker, are a perfect match in size.

 

Bolt 01.jpg

This and the photo below shows how well painting the heads and wingnuts along with

only replacing all of the washers will vastly improve the look of the tripod.

Wingnut01.jpg

These changes are a slight mod from maintaining the scope's 100% originality, 

and came with a modest cost of $4.50 wink.png  


Edited by Kasmos, 24 March 2020 - 02:30 AM.

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#23 walter a

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Posted 24 March 2020 - 08:08 AM

Chris, although some hardware differences your resto is going nicely and I'm keenly following along. I also notice your legs have some blocking between the the hub and the tray that would make it a little more rigid. I might have to look for some mahogany.

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#24 mattyfatz

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Posted 24 March 2020 - 10:37 AM

What a great quarantine project! Looks great!


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#25 Kasmos

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Posted 24 March 2020 - 01:18 PM

Chris, although some hardware differences your resto is going nicely and I'm keenly following along. I also notice your legs have some blocking between the the hub and the tray that would make it a little more rigid. I might have to look for some mahogany.

Walter,

My scope's tripod lower inner legs have holes drilled for different height settings. Is your's the same or do they slide for height adjustments?

 

Also, I noticed yours has a solid slow motion control shaft. Mine has the flexible cable type. That's probably something I'd like to change.


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