Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Favorite targets in a small refractor ?

  • Please log in to reply
55 replies to this topic

#26 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 91,878
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 23 March 2020 - 10:53 AM

NGC 2420 is on the Herschel 400 list.  I observe it frequently when I'm touring through Gemini.

 

https://www.noao.edu...tml/im0726.html

 

https://in-the-sky.o....php?id=NGC2420

 

http://www.kopernik....chive/n2420.htm


  • eros312, ken30809, Bomber Bob and 1 other like this

#27 Don W

Don W

    Founding Member

  • *****
  • Posts: 24,406
  • Joined: 19 May 2003
  • Loc: Wisconsin, USA

Posted 23 March 2020 - 11:13 AM

Clusters, open and globular. Double stars and planets. I know a lot of people use them on the moon, but I never look at it myself. Some of the brighter galaxies and nebula.

 

In 2005 I took a trip with about a dozen others from the US to Australia. We spent a week observing through many telescopes up to a 30" dob under dark skies. One night I set up my TV 102i on a Gibraltar mount with Argo Navis DSCs. I set the Argo to show me globular clusters brighter than 8th magnitude. I spent several hours doing that. It was one of the best refractor nights I've ever had.


  • eros312, Nippon, Bomber Bob and 2 others like this

#28 Bean614

Bean614

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,060
  • Joined: 05 Nov 2015
  • Loc: Mass.

Posted 23 March 2020 - 06:52 PM

Unfortunately, Celestial Sampler is out of print. Sue's Deep-Sky Wonders is still out there. The latter is more in depth but I miss the concise approach of the former. Without thinking, I gave my copy of the Sampler to a friend. When I went looking to replace it... nada.

"Celestial Sampler is out of print."     Yes, but if you can't find a copy (Amazon,  etc.), you're not really looking. 


  • ken30809 likes this

#29 klausW

klausW

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 5
  • Joined: 24 Mar 2020

Posted 24 March 2020 - 05:23 PM

Who has experiences with a ES (Explore Scientific) 127mm Achromat refractor. I am reading a lot astronomy since some years, have a 90mm ORION refractor on a equatorial mount, which gave me a hard time while observing. Since then I don't use it. Would like starhopping on a alt-azimuth mount.

thanks for your help!

klausW



#30 GroupJ

GroupJ

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 49
  • Joined: 02 Apr 2020

Posted 12 April 2020 - 10:32 PM

Wow,

I'm really surprised that the planets aren't on the top of everybody's list.  I can look at Saturn all night when she is up.  Jupiter is also a favorite.  my scope is a 102 f6.5 


  • ken30809 and AndresEsteban like this

#31 gjanke

gjanke

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 387
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2016

Posted 13 April 2020 - 12:10 AM

Off the top of my head, some of my favorites would include Collinder 65, Collinder 69, Collinder 70, Collinder 399, Harrington 14, IC 4665, IC 4756, Kemble 1, Melotte 20, Melotte 25, Melotte 111, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M8, M11, M13, M17, M22, M24, M27, M31, M34, M35, M36, M37, M38, M39, M41, M42, M44, M45, M47, M48, M71, M81, M82, M103, M104, NGC 457, NGC 752, NGC 869, NGC 884, NGC 2264, NGC 6231, NGC 6633, NGC 7000, NGC 7789, Picot 1, and Stock 2.

Now this is a person that does year round viewing.

 

My only surprise is that NGC 6826 isn’t listed along with Alberio M64, M65, M92, M95, and M96 which are just a few small refractor targets. They along with at least 10 more that come to mind are prime objects for a three inch scope.

 

Gerald 



#32 jimandlaura26

jimandlaura26

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 394
  • Joined: 19 Nov 2003
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 13 April 2020 - 03:02 AM

Who has experiences with a ES (Explore Scientific) 127mm Achromat refractor. I am reading a lot astronomy since some years, have a 90mm ORION refractor on a equatorial mount, which gave me a hard time while observing. Since then I don't use it. Would like starhopping on a alt-azimuth mount.

thanks for your help!

klausW

I recommend you purchase the book Turn Left at Orion. It will be of great assistance to you.


Edited by jimandlaura26, 13 April 2020 - 03:02 AM.

  • Nippon likes this

#33 Eddgie

Eddgie

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 26,588
  • Joined: 01 Feb 2006

Posted 13 April 2020 - 12:31 PM

The sun. 


  • Astrojensen likes this

#34 ken30809

ken30809

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 225
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2009
  • Loc: Midwest

Posted 13 April 2020 - 12:55 PM

"Celestial Sampler is out of print."     Yes, but if you can't find a copy (Amazon,  etc.), you're not really looking. 

I just ordered a used copy off of Amazon from a bookstore in Indiana. Thanks for the tip!



#35 ken30809

ken30809

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 225
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2009
  • Loc: Midwest

Posted 13 April 2020 - 12:59 PM

Wow,

I'm really surprised that the planets aren't on the top of everybody's list.  I can look at Saturn all night when she is up.  Jupiter is also a favorite.  my scope is a 102 f6.5 

I agree. Jupiter and Saturn are my favorites. Also Mars. These are wonderful views in my F/9 Tak and in my SV125.
 


Edited by ken30809, 13 April 2020 - 12:59 PM.

  • AndresEsteban likes this

#36 Eddgie

Eddgie

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 26,588
  • Joined: 01 Feb 2006

Posted 13 April 2020 - 01:07 PM

Wow,

I'm really surprised that the planets aren't on the top of everybody's list.  I can look at Saturn all night when she is up.  Jupiter is also a favorite.  my scope is a 102 f6.5 

There are much better scopes for planets than small refractors.

 

The sun is a special case as far as solar system objects go because daytime seeing is often so poor that even a 100mm telescope will more often than not be working at below their full resolution.

 

For the rest, small refractors are not really the best choice.

 

Now, if one only had a small refractor, one must use it, and given that, then you can get a view that is pleasing, but for  most dedicated planetary observers, these instruments are not really that satisfying to use. The same 106mm Apo triplet I use for solar white light is badly outclassed by my planetary scope.  I mean you can bring a Buick to a sports car race, but it is not going to beat a Corvette.   The Buick though is probably a better choice for taking 2.5 kids to school.

 

On the sun though, a good a good 4" Apo is very hard to beat. 


Edited by Eddgie, 13 April 2020 - 01:12 PM.

  • Don W, peleuba, Doug Culbertson and 2 others like this

#37 peleuba

peleuba

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,408
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2004
  • Loc: North of Baltimore, MD

Posted 13 April 2020 - 01:10 PM

There are much better scopes for planets than small refractors.

 

<SNIP>

 

On the sun though, a good a good 4" Apo is very hard to beat. 

 

This.



#38 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 13,175
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 13 April 2020 - 01:15 PM

The sun. 

If there's some good activity, I can spend hours on end looking at the Sun. My 63mm Zeiss Telemator works wonderfully well with a Quark H-alpha filter and can show a LOT of interesting details. If the seeing is good, it shows a shocking amount of detail in the prominences. 

 

Sadly, the Sun has been very quiet for a long time. There was a little activity today, according to GONG, but the wind was so strong, that I gave up setting up the scope.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


  • Doug Culbertson, Sasa, AndresEsteban and 2 others like this

#39 Jsquared

Jsquared

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 323
  • Joined: 21 Nov 2019
  • Loc: Duncan, Ok

Posted 13 April 2020 - 06:17 PM

So since galaxy season is just around the corner what targets would you suggest? Btw don’t post about small refractors being a poor choice for galaxies. My 16 inch dob will have to wait a few years. Look at the thread topic.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

#40 barbie

barbie

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,248
  • Joined: 28 Jan 2013
  • Loc: Northeast Ohio

Posted 13 April 2020 - 07:00 PM

Mars, Jupiter and Saturn are very satisfying objects to view through my 3" refractors. There is also the moon and a plethora of multiple stars as well as the brighter Messiers and NGC's that have, and continue to keep me busy for the rest of my life!! It's all in the experience and patience of the observer and in the sky/seeing conditions.


Edited by barbie, 13 April 2020 - 07:07 PM.

  • daquad, paul m schofield, AndresEsteban and 1 other like this

#41 jcj380

jcj380

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,856
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2014
  • Loc: Hellinois

Posted 14 April 2020 - 12:45 PM

Open clusters, brighter Messier objects.



#42 Doug Culbertson

Doug Culbertson

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8,324
  • Joined: 06 Jan 2005
  • Loc: N. Florida

Posted 14 April 2020 - 12:53 PM

If there's some good activity, I can spend hours on end looking at the Sun. My 63mm Zeiss Telemator works wonderfully well with a Quark H-alpha filter and can show a LOT of interesting details. If the seeing is good, it shows a shocking amount of detail in the prominences. 

 

Sadly, the Sun has been very quiet for a long time. There was a little activity today, according to GONG, but the wind was so strong, that I gave up setting up the scope.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

For the better part of the last year I have pretty much looked at the sun exclusively. My current Lunt LS80THa is awesome, but the Quark Chromosphere in a 102 f/5 was pretty great too. 


  • Astrojensen likes this

#43 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 13,175
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 14 April 2020 - 01:09 PM

So since galaxy season is just around the corner what targets would you suggest? Btw don’t post about small refractors being a poor choice for galaxies. My 16 inch dob will have to wait a few years. Look at the thread topic.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

The Messier catalogue has some good, bright galaxies. M82, M106 are particularly bright and show details to a careful observer, even with very small telescopes. M82 shows some two or three dust bands and two large, bright clouds in even a 60mm under dark skies. It also forms a superb pair with M81. M106 shows a bright center and a bright spiral arm. M66 can also show a bright arm, extending to the south, and forms a nice pair with M65 and a trio with it and NGC 3628. M51 and its companion almost doesn't need mentioning. M101 can show a surprising amount of details, including H-II regions, under dark skies.

 

There's a lot more than those, of course. I recommend trying to observe all the Messier galaxies. He really found some of the best ones. There's a handful of bright NGCs that he missed, though. NGC 2903, 2403, 3115, 2841, 5907, 2775, 4449, 4490+4485, 4631, comes to mind, but there's a lot more.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


  • daquad, NYJohn S and Jsquared like this

#44 NYJohn S

NYJohn S

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,286
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2016
  • Loc: Northport, NY

Posted 14 April 2020 - 01:29 PM

I was out last night with my 80mm and was surprised how well I saw some of the brighter Messier galaxies. I would add M104 to the list. Especially with the Jaws and Stargate asterisms there which also look nice in a small scope.

 

Out of the NGC's Thomas listed I viewed NGC 2903. I was surprised how well it took magnification which really helped with the small scope. Now I'll have to try some of the others. 



#45 daquad

daquad

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,714
  • Joined: 14 May 2008

Posted 14 April 2020 - 01:51 PM

The Messier catalogue has some good, bright galaxies. M82, M106 are particularly bright and show details to a careful observer, even with very small telescopes. M82 shows some two or three dust bands and two large, bright clouds in even a 60mm under dark skies. It also forms a superb pair with M81. M106 shows a bright center and a bright spiral arm. M66 can also show a bright arm, extending to the south, and forms a nice pair with M65 and a trio with it and NGC 3628. M51 and its companion almost doesn't need mentioning. M101 can show a surprising amount of details, including H-II regions, under dark skies.

 

There's a lot more than those, of course. I recommend trying to observe all the Messier galaxies. He really found some of the best ones. There's a handful of bright NGCs that he missed, though. NGC 2903, 2403, 3115, 2841, 5907, 2775, 4449, 4490+4485, 4631, comes to mind, but there's a lot more.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

A lot more indeed.  I especially like NGC 4565 in Coma as a beautiful example of an edge-on galaxy.

 

Dom Q.


  • Astrojensen likes this

#46 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 13,175
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 14 April 2020 - 01:58 PM

A lot more indeed.  I especially like NGC 4565 in Coma as a beautiful example of an edge-on galaxy.

 

Dom Q.

How could I forget that one? I blame my advanced age of 43... 

 

But joking aside, there's simply so many galaxies within reach of even a very small scope (when used under dark skies) that it's nearly impossible to remember them all. From what I recall, there's around 200 galaxies brighter than mag 11 - and a whopping 1000 brighter than mag 12! 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark 


  • daquad likes this

#47 caronb

caronb

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 48
  • Joined: 04 Apr 2019
  • Loc: Toronto, Ontario

Posted 14 April 2020 - 02:12 PM

I live a a large city with a Bortle 8-9 sky so l have lots of challenges.  Planets are OK, but I never look at the moon.  My favourite activities are splitting doubles and finding faint clusters.  I get huge satisfaction when I spend a lot of time looking for and finally seeing what was there all along.  85mm isn't that big and many targets are very illusive in a city sky.  I've learned to look for only a small, faint portion of clusters instead of expecting the whole thing to pop into view (eg. NCC 7789).  Doubles - Red, Blue or Yellow ones are especially interesting.

 

What a great way to spend a night. My favourite time is from 3:00am until dawn when the city is finally asleep and there's just me and the occasional raccoon.  


  • NickWDavis, eros312 and jcj380 like this

#48 Nippon

Nippon

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,544
  • Joined: 22 Oct 2009
  • Loc: Central Florida

Posted 14 April 2020 - 05:10 PM

With my 4" Vixen ED just about all the doubles within it's resolving power and especially the color contrast ones like Albireo. Deep sky stuff like the Dumbell, Swan and most all of the Messier objects show well especially from dark skies. Open clusters do well also and I especially like M37 and the double cluster.


  • gjanke likes this

#49 Nippon

Nippon

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,544
  • Joined: 22 Oct 2009
  • Loc: Central Florida

Posted 14 April 2020 - 05:15 PM

Clusters, open and globular. Double stars and planets. I know a lot of people use them on the moon, but I never look at it myself. Some of the brighter galaxies and nebula.

 

In 2005 I took a trip with about a dozen others from the US to Australia. We spent a week observing through many telescopes up to a 30" dob under dark skies. One night I set up my TV 102i on a Gibraltar mount with Argo Navis DSCs. I set the Argo to show me globular clusters brighter than 8th magnitude. I spent several hours doing that. It was one of the best refractor nights I've ever had.

 

I almost never look at the Moon either. I don't know why maybe because it has human footprints on it or is just too bright and I get a lot of kidney beaning in my ES widefields.


  • gjanke likes this

#50 daquad

daquad

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,714
  • Joined: 14 May 2008

Posted 14 April 2020 - 06:27 PM

How could I forget that one? I blame my advanced age of 43... 

 

But joking aside, there's simply so many galaxies within reach of even a very small scope (when used under dark skies) that it's nearly impossible to remember them all. From what I recall, there's around 200 galaxies brighter than mag 11 - and a whopping 1000 brighter than mag 12! 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark 

You have viewed far more than I.  And I'm much older than you.

 

Dom Q.




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics