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Fun household microscope items

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10 replies to this topic

#1 GOLGO13

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 01:16 PM

Had fun the other day looking a gunk from the dishwasher. Nothing moving, but some interesting bits and pieces. Including some sort of bug's leg. What other items do you like to look at?

#2 ButterFly

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 01:21 PM

Toilet water is always fun.  Pick up some gentian violet from the pharmacy to stain the Gram positive stuff.



#3 colinrm

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 02:37 PM

You can never go wrong with a little water from a ditch or puddle in your yard!

 

http://microscopy.co...-slugs-720.webm


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#4 Terra Nova

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Posted 24 March 2020 - 03:32 PM

Dog water dish in the yard and also the bird bath are nice zoos!



#5 mich_al

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Posted 24 March 2020 - 09:55 PM

Spices, look for insect part.  Nettles in the Spring, the poison pods.  dust



#6 PXR-5

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Posted 30 March 2020 - 07:28 PM

Oh boy, I am replacing the liner in the pool, it is down to about 3 inches of nastiness :)
I can see all sorts of things moving with just my eyes :)

#7 PXR-5

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Posted 30 March 2020 - 07:29 PM

Dog water dish in the yard and also the bird bath are nice zoos!


Thanks for the reminder to change her water...
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#8 star drop

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Posted 19 April 2020 - 06:27 PM

Human hair, pet fur and bird feathers are interesting items to view.



#9 db2005

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Posted 23 April 2020 - 04:23 AM

Lots of interesting objects can be found without even leaving your house: Looking at an offset-printed page from a pamplet - you can see individual dots making up pictures; single cells in onion peel; thin slices of cork from a wine bottle; salt crystals; sugar crystals (especially good-looking in dark-field, which is a simple addition to your microscope); crossed layers of transparent adhesive tape is mind-blowing to look at if you add polarization to your microscope (which is a quite simple hack too). In fact, several objects look more interesting using dark-field or polarization; pollen samples from flowers or trees. Wings, legs, etc. from dead flies/mosquitoes found on the windowsill; different kinds of textile fibers (these can look pretty nice under polarized light). Yeast cells.

 

Also, cultivating water critters collected from a bird bath is very easy. Collect a water sample from the bird bath into a petri dish - be sure to get some dirt/algae too; then add a single drop of milk. The bacteria will feed on the milk, and the critters (rotifers, paramecia, vorticella, etc) will feed on the bacteria, and will soon (within a day or two) become abundant in the petri dish. One word of caution: Be careful with the culture you are growing, and always observe careful hygiene, as you never know exactly which bacteria you are cultivating.


Edited by db2005, 23 April 2020 - 04:24 AM.

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#10 Mike E.

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Posted 26 April 2020 - 04:11 PM

My only microscope is a Nikon Stereo model, which I really enjoy.

 

Recently while looking at a page in my " Moon Mars and Venus - by Rukl " guide, which is a very small book, I decided to look at one of the illustrated maps under the microscope, and was surprised at how intricate the printing was. The detail was finer than I could see with wearing reading glasses and using a magnifying glass together. smile.gif

 

Another interesting thing I found was when I had a look at some of my guitar picks. The wear pattern on them all appeared the same, and on both sides; almost close enough like a fingerprint, lol.

 

A few days ago I sustained a nasty cut on my forearm, and used the microscope to see if there was anything needing removal before I bandaged it . Since then I've been closely observing the healing progress daily, which has been quite interesting.


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#11 Mbinoc

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Posted 30 April 2020 - 10:26 AM

For the last week or so I have been looking at all sorts of things. Mold from some bread, cheek cells, Flower pollen, standing water, pricked my finger and looked at some blood.

 

I also have several prepared slides from past microscope purchases. but have found that its much more interesting to collect my own specimens.

 

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I recently ordered some 32mm color filters I'm still waiting for. On a side note, I found that 1.25" telescope color filters almost fit into my microscope filter tray. I have tried a few of them, and they do work.


Edited by Mbinoc, 30 April 2020 - 11:10 AM.

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