Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

celestron nextstar 6se vs skywatcher Pro Ed 100mm

  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 dalr753

dalr753

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 7
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2020

Posted 24 March 2020 - 01:46 PM

Hi guys! after my first post where i asked about the skywatcher pro ed 80mm, my family offered to contribute for a telesope as a birthday gift. because of this my price range went up a bit and (at least used ) i can now afford either of the two in the title.

 on amazon both get good reviews and im unsure what will get more bang for my buck as a general use scope for dso and planets.

the celestron comes with a goto mount and no one posted any planet pics with the skywatcher, but the nebula pics are amazing!

 

thanks in advance!



#2 StarryHill

StarryHill

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 477
  • Joined: 24 Jul 2015

Posted 24 March 2020 - 02:35 PM

The C6se is very popular and you get a lot for your money. No, it won't be as sharp as the refractor -- stars will appear a bit bloated and details on planets will be softer.  But DSOs will be a bit brighter. One thing to keep in mind is that the mount, as good a value as it is, only works via the hand controller. There is no manual mode meaning you can't move the telescope by hand. Once you learn the night sky a bit, you may find this mount to be very slow to move from target to target via the hand controller and motors. And, if the electronics go bad (which happened to a friend's 8se), it becomes unusable. 

 

The 100mm Pro ED is going to offer sharper views but DSOs will be a bit dimmer. What mount are you considering? With a good mount, this option is going to cost a lot more. Personally, if the budget allowed, I would go with this because of the sharper views and because I could then get a good alt-az mount that has a manual mode.


  • SteveG, Gary Z and jeffreym like this

#3 Gary Z

Gary Z

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,577
  • Joined: 26 Jan 2012
  • Loc: New Mexico

Posted 24 March 2020 - 03:05 PM

Wow, great set of options here.  Both scopes are good.  I love the weight and ease of handling the SCTs on the mount.  That's also what I love about small refractors as well.  In fact, I have used my AT72ED on my SE Mount and also my EVO mount.  If you want an easy to setup and start using type of mount, the 6 SE is a great visual use mount.  Of course it will do ok for solar system imaging.  

 

Note this ED100 telescope weighs in at close to 30 lbs (13.6kg).  So at this point, if this is what you want, you'll carefully choose your options for a mount.  

 

1) Goto/motorized or full manual mount

2) EQ or Alt-Az.

3) weight consideration for future use

 

#3 is important especially if you are considering atrophotography.  With a scope at already at 30 lbs, add cameras, possibly filter wheel, etc, you may need a mount that handles 40 - 45 lbs.  If astrophotography is not a factor, ok this only leaves you with #1 and #2 to think about.  

 

There are several options on the manual alt az mount that are easy to setup and get going.   There are few gotomorized Atl-az mounts that could handle this scope.  There are few eq manual eq mounts that could handle the scope, but for visual use, any that can handle the 30 lb payload should do.  For astrophotography use, you have several mounts that will handle this payload that are in the 45lb capacity.  

 

Additionally, a good solid alt az mount will be a joy to use.  I've enjoyed both my SE and EVO mounts and I also use a manual mount, the twilight I mount. 

 

There's one other advantage of the SE route.  Any money saved can be used for eyepieces or at least a lunar filter.  There are other things you may want to consider.  Hey, it's always good to know you have options.

 

Best wishes on your choice and reach back for any questions.

 

Gary


  • jeffreym likes this

#4 jeffreym

jeffreym

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 184
  • Joined: 02 Dec 2016
  • Loc: La Crosse, WI

Posted 24 March 2020 - 03:15 PM

I have had and loved the 6SE and have used 102mm refractors for much of my observing.  The SE is light and easy and great for outreach (it can be set up low to the ground so kids can reach the eyepiece).  For observing carbon stars and double stars and brighter DSOs I have always landed on one of my 102mm refractors (ES EDT102CF (f/7), ES AR102 (f/6.5), Celestron Omni XLT 102 (f/6.5), Meade Infinity 102 (f/5.9), Celestron/Sky-Watcher 102mm (f/5), Celestron 100mm ED spotting (f/5.4), SV Access 102 (f/7).  I have used all of these on a Twilight 1 mount.   The SW Pro102 (f/7.5) would be a great scope and you would not be disappointed with the view.  I think you would find it to be a "keeper".  I sold my 6SE and replaced it with a LX65 6" Mak.  I actually regret that and am thinking about going back (but keeping the LX65 and Mak - it's too fun to let go right now).  So, for me, I would get the 4" refractor.  Too many great views are waiting for you with that one to pass it up. Don't forget to have a budget to get a solid mount.

Have fun,

Jeff


Edited by jeffreym, 24 March 2020 - 11:05 PM.


#5 SteveG

SteveG

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8,173
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2006
  • Loc: Seattle, WA

Posted 24 March 2020 - 04:07 PM

Hi guys! after my first post where i asked about the skywatcher pro ed 80mm, my family offered to contribute for a telesope as a birthday gift. because of this my price range went up a bit and (at least used ) i can now afford either of the two in the title.

 on amazon both get good reviews and im unsure what will get more bang for my buck as a general use scope for dso and planets.

the celestron comes with a goto mount and no one posted any planet pics with the skywatcher, but the nebula pics are amazing!

 

thanks in advance!

Just to be sure you understand, nebula will not look anything like is does in those photos. Be prepared for that.

 

Both scopes are very good. You just have to decide how wide or narrow of field you prefer. I’m with Starry Hill on my preference (see post #2).


  • jeffreym likes this

#6 Jond105

Jond105

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 5,059
  • Joined: 19 Feb 2018
  • Loc: Detroit

Posted 24 March 2020 - 06:31 PM

I’ve had 3 100ED’s. Without a doubt I can recommend that. A CG4 is more than capable of holding one for an EQ Mount. An  AZ4 Mount can handle the 100ED but has no slo motion controls. But finding an alt az mount that can hold it with slo mo controls will be harder to find. Planetary views, lunar views are amazing. Brighter DSO’s are great. I’ve never owned a bad 100ED. 


  • SteveG likes this

#7 dalr753

dalr753

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 7
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2020

Posted 24 March 2020 - 07:13 PM

dang they both sound really good. thank you guys!



#8 SeattleScott

SeattleScott

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7,194
  • Joined: 14 Oct 2011

Posted 24 March 2020 - 07:22 PM

SCT works best for GoTo because of the narrow view. Do you want GoTo or do you want to learn the sky?

#9 NYJohn S

NYJohn S

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,090
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2016
  • Loc: Northport, NY

Posted 24 March 2020 - 07:42 PM

If this is going to be your only telescope I’d go with the 6SE. It will be better for DSO with the extra aperture. Get the 6.3 reducer / corrector to max out the wide field views and it’s a versatile setup. I had one for a number of years and even did some imaging of brighter DSO. With a big heavy dslr hanging on the back the mount held up and never gave me any trouble. A 100mm refractor is nice but I think it’s a good second scope to compliment a larger one. I never had bloated stars with my 6SE and it stayed collimated quite well.
  • JOEinCO likes this

#10 outofsight

outofsight

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,711
  • Joined: 31 May 2015

Posted 24 March 2020 - 07:59 PM

From post 3, where do you get this?

 

"Note this ED100 telescope weighs in at close to 30 lbs (13.6kg)." That's probably off by about 20 pounds.

 

And as far as the 6SE or the Pro ED 100mm, first I'd buy the 4" refractor, and then I'd get an 8" SCT whenever I found a good deal on one. However, you can't go wrong with any of these. Good luck with your decision.


Edited by outofsight, 24 March 2020 - 08:02 PM.

  • Jon Isaacs likes this

#11 Beeham

Beeham

    Explorer 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 92
  • Joined: 08 Nov 2019
  • Loc: Oakland County, Michigan

Posted 24 March 2020 - 08:42 PM

One additional thing to consider - the 6SE (or any catadioptric scope) will take quite a bit longer to come to thermal equilibrium than a refractor.

 

My 100ED seems to take about 20 minutes, my SCT takes about an hour and a half.  Thus, a cat will require more planning and be less amenable to quick grab-and-go viewing than the refractor.

 

If it were me, I would go with the refractor.  That's just my $0.02.

 

I hope this is helpful.  Cheers!


  • izar187 likes this

#12 izar187

izar187

    Skylab

  • -----
  • Posts: 4,096
  • Joined: 02 Sep 2006
  • Loc: 43N

Posted 25 March 2020 - 04:16 AM

There is no question that to my eye, a 6" scope will out resolve a 4" scope on just about all targets.

Will yield generally brighter, more detailed, and take higher magnification, easier.

But this 6, as just noted, will not be as fast and ready to go on a moments notice, as will the 4".

 

So, does one get to set the scope out for awhile before hand, and then step out to observe?

Because Idaho has climate, as I recall, so there sure can be acclimation needed.

If so, then the really compact 6" SCT may be the way to go.

Just set up early, before observing.

 

If the rest of life, or living circumstances are such that one can not leave the scope outside ahead of time,

then the very well regarded 4" ED would be a better choice. IMHO

It will have the very significant benefit of yielding a much larger lowest over field of view, making finding stuff easier.



#13 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 83,039
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 25 March 2020 - 05:18 AM

Note this ED100 telescope weighs in at close to 30 lbs (13.6kg).

 

Outofsight pointed this out but I want to make it clear, the ED-100 OTA: The OTA is very lightweight, the barebones OTA weighs about 7 lbs.

 

https://www.astronom...-refractor.html

 

Regarding the differences in the views:

 

The ED-100 is a very good quality 4 inch refractor with excellent color correction and very good optics.  It will show you everything that is possible for a 4 inch telescope with a 900 mm focal length.  Optically, there are no compromises but it is a 4 inch scope.  The mount is extra.. 

 

The 6 inch SCT is $150 less and comes with a full GOTO mount.  That puts these two scopes in very different price catagories.  Optically, the C-6 is a decent quality scope but has optical compromises that affect the quality of the view.  The over all light through put is about that of a 5 inch refractor.  Fine scale contrast is reduced because of the central obstruction.  

 

And too, in this price range, there are telescopes that are more capable for both planetary and the deep sky. 

 

Jon


  • The Luckster likes this

#14 Tank

Tank

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,116
  • Joined: 27 Jul 2009
  • Loc: Stoney Creek, Ontario, CANADA

Posted 25 March 2020 - 09:57 AM

tough call both are nice

a few major points

 

1. More aperture always better for DSOs and images being brighter and more detail

2. mount the SE is a really nice tracking and goto mount IMHO

 

100mm ED - sharp and best thing it will do is really great on the MOON

6" SE - will do everything well and start to get you into DSOs

 

negatives

100mm - Aperture small for DSOs even planetary

6" - cool down make sure no thermal issues or will have POOR mush images bad for nights where temps keep dropping never get a great planetary image!!

 

Personally if you can stretch and get a 8" thats where it start to really open up the skies

8" DOB

8" NEWT

8" SCT

8" APO :) haha


  • Jon Isaacs likes this

#15 whizbang

whizbang

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 590
  • Joined: 18 Mar 2018
  • Loc: NE of Seattle, WA

Posted 25 March 2020 - 07:37 PM

I guess I'm stumped.

 

My Amazon search shows both scopes about $800.  The 6SE has the scope, mount, and tripod, ready to play.  The refractor is SCOPE ONLY.  One still needs a mount and tripod, and those aren't cheap.

 

I own a SE and EVO mount and both are excellent.  The SE is the clear choice.  The cost of an extra mount/tripod puts the Skywatcher in a more expensive price range.  Am I missing something?  Or is the Pro Ed 100 missing something (like a base to put it on)!?


Edited by whizbang, 25 March 2020 - 07:38 PM.


#16 The Luckster

The Luckster

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 816
  • Joined: 12 May 2017
  • Loc: Los Angeles, CA

Posted 26 March 2020 - 10:12 AM

Note this ED100 telescope weighs in at close to 30 lbs (13.6kg).

 

Outofsight pointed this out but I want to make it clear, the ED-100 OTA: The OTA is very lightweight, the barebones OTA weighs about 7 lbs.

 

https://www.astronom...-refractor.html

 

Regarding the differences in the views:

 

The ED-100 is a very good quality 4 inch refractor with excellent color correction and very good optics.  It will show you everything that is possible for a 4 inch telescope with a 900 mm focal length.  Optically, there are no compromises but it is a 4 inch scope.  The mount is extra.. 

 

The 6 inch SCT is $150 less and comes with a full GOTO mount.  That puts these two scopes in very different price catagories.  Optically, the C-6 is a decent quality scope but has optical compromises that affect the quality of the view.  The over all light through put is about that of a 5 inch refractor.  Fine scale contrast is reduced because of the central obstruction.  

 

And too, in this price range, there are telescopes that are more capable for both planetary and the deep sky. 

 

Jon

In regards to the weight of the Skywatcher 100ED, the following is a cut n paste snippet of a post I made elsewhere: 

 

The optical tube, tube-rings with dovetail, SW 2" diagonal with 1.25" adapter and the 8x50 finder and bracket weigh in at 10 lbs 5.5 oz.

 

I own the SW100 ED, and it has been a phenomenal tool even when seeing has been poor (which is far too often), but it's going to need a capable mount.  My Explore Scientific Twilight I Alt/Az mount with the SW100 ED and accessories loaded is just barely acceptable to me, while others find this mount not capable enough for the load.  Now, the SW100 is rock solid when mounted on my iOptron Mini-tower.

 

I once owned a Celestron C8 SCT almost 30 years ago, but I do currently own two Maks; a 90 and a 127.  I liked the C8 a lot when I had it, and I like my two Maks as well.  Heck, I have seen a lot of DSOs with my 90 Mak, that little tube packs a huge punch.  But now I have relegated my Maks to higher magnification duty.  I personally prefer views from a refractor; DSO, planetary, doubles, you name it.

 

However, given your query and your relative newness (I am only assuming this) to astronomy, I must confess the a Celestron 6 SE would be the better purchase for you.  With the 6 SE, you get all that you need to get started and pointed towards the sky.  If this hobby grows on you, or want it to grow on you, seek out Astronomy clubs and Outreach events...within the current limitations on social gatherings and keeping safe during these current times.

 

Good luck in your decision, and CSS

 

jason




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics