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Ancestor of all animals identified

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#1 russell23

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 08:37 PM

Earliest animal with bilateral symmetry found in Ediacaran fauna ~555 my old:

 

https://www.scienced...00323152108.htm

 

https://www.pnas.org...3/17/2001045117


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#2 llanitedave

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 09:45 PM

Earliest animal with bilateral symmetry found in Ediacaran fauna ~555 my old:

 

https://www.scienced...00323152108.htm

 

https://www.pnas.org...3/17/2001045117

That reminds me...

 

There are some Ediacaran-age deposits not too far from where I live, and it's been my goal for a while to get up there and see if I can repeat any of these "experiments".  The last hike I took I photographed some very suspicious features that looked like possible burrows that had been distorted by bottom currents.  They look too big to represent these particular critters, but they're about the same age, I think.

 

 

ediacaranburrows.jpg

 

 

 

Here's some good hiking country along the Nevada-California border near Death Valley.  It has some real untapped promise, I believe.

 

https://nai.nasa.gov...y_Article_2.pdf


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#3 havasman

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 09:50 PM

And it bears a strong resemblance to what we saw Mr. Towel-ey as on Southpark.

 

I don't know how to spell Towel-ey. Got a plan?



#4 BillP

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 10:15 PM

Earliest animal with bilateral symmetry found in Ediacaran fauna ~555 my old:

WoW, my great great .... ubergreat grandpa!!  I can't wait until they find a second and different animal with bilateral symmetry that is dated back to the same time!  Discovery sure is fun help.gif


Edited by BillP, 25 March 2020 - 10:18 PM.

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#5 astroneil

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 07:30 AM

GTF

 

https://evolutionnew...aran-sediments/


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#6 llanitedave

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 09:48 AM

WoW, my great great .... ubergreat grandpa!!  I can't wait until they find a second and different animal with bilateral symmetry that is dated back to the same time!  Discovery sure is fun help.gif

And they just might!  But at that stage of development, the differences are not likely to be remarkable.  (And the level of detail in the existing fossils doesn't really allow too much fine discrimination of features.)

 

Essentially, all the evolutionary development since that uber-ancestor has been a matter of embellishing on that very basic bilateralian plan.  Much of the more fundamental biochemistry and cellular specialization work had already been accomplished by then.  That's why it took 3 billion years to get to that point.


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#7 llanitedave

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 09:53 AM

Very nice counter-interpretation.  It leads inevitably to one of the most exciting phrases in science:

 

"More work is needed."

 

And see, Neil?  You CAN contribute useful material when you're not spamming!



#8 BillP

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 02:51 PM

And they just might!  But at that stage of development, the differences are not likely to be remarkable.  (And the level of detail in the existing fossils doesn't really allow too much fine discrimination of features.)

That's what I like about these topics....well it might be, but then it might not be also.  Does not really get anywhere.  What is interesting about the past is that one can make many guesses and deductions, even with a seemingly certainty, but in the end you can never really say for sure because we can never have all the facts.  So in the end it is can never really get beyond the educated guess (what I call musings) stage based on incomplete data, no matter how strong the argument.  "Likely" never equals "Is". Still fun though.


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#9 llanitedave

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 09:45 PM

That's what I like about these topics....well it might be, but then it might not be also.  Does not really get anywhere.  What is interesting about the past is that one can make many guesses and deductions, even with a seemingly certainty, but in the end you can never really say for sure because we can never have all the facts.  So in the end it is can never really get beyond the educated guess (what I call musings) stage based on incomplete data, no matter how strong the argument.  "Likely" never equals "Is". Still fun though.

I'm not so pessimistic, Bill.  Sure, we will never know for sure, but the quality of our uncertainty grows with time and effort.  It actually does get somewhere further than we were before.  How many, when I was a kid, would have suspected that birds were dinosaurs, and that other dinosaurs were warm blooded or had feathers?  Who suspected that we'd be able to sequence the DNA of various bacteria and viruses, and use that knowledge of their evolutionary relationships to improve medicines?  Who suspected that we'd be able to find within ourselves the DNA traces of undiscovered ancestral populations and understand how those legacies gave some of us the advantages or vulnerabilities that we carry?  Progress doesn't mean absolute certainty, and knowledge doesn't mean omniscience.  But it does, gradually, make our lives better.  I'm perfectly happy with that.


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#10 David E

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Posted 30 March 2020 - 07:49 PM

Ancestor of all animals? I thought that was John Belushi! hmm.gif



#11 llanitedave

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Posted 31 March 2020 - 10:42 AM

Ancestor of all animals? I thought that was John Belushi! hmm.gif

I always thought of him more as an offshoot.




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