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C/2019 Y4 Atlas Comet

imaging
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#1 SonnyE

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Posted 27 March 2020 - 01:52 AM

I wanted to try and catch this if possible, and I got a chance tonight.

 

I only got 3 images for all my efforts. But I'll take it.

The clouds came back and I had to pull back in my equipment.

Had to quit at 9 PM. gaah.gif

 

But it let me prove out Stellarium to target it, and my mount to track it.

I hope the weather will let me build a file one night so I can make a video of this latest comet.

If only... stinking weather.

 

2 minute, 2 image stack

sml_gallery_252608_12833_22496.jpg
 
15 minutes, 15 image stack
sml_gallery_252608_12833_23898.jpg
 
20 minutes, 20 image stack
sml_gallery_252608_12833_17424.jpg
 
 
Atik Infinity OSC camera. 60 second exposures. Self stacking. Manual saving.
Converted from tif format to gif format to comply with CN requirements for size.
Otherwise, direct from the camera.

 


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#2 cnoct

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Posted 27 March 2020 - 02:38 AM

Yes but you got it even if only for a brief period. I've only had the occasional 10sec sucker hole views to see and find at 11x.

 

I appreciate the image scale at which you've captured it. Perfectly shows just how small this comet is at low power, even with it's "massive" coma. 


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#3 highfnum

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Posted 27 March 2020 - 05:18 AM

yup its small(as of now)


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#4 GoFish

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Posted 27 March 2020 - 01:35 PM

Here is my contribution to the thread:

 

Observed 25-March-2020 UT 02:14:35 (10:14 pm EDT):from Lexington, KY (Bortle 7/8)

5 frames, 15s each, 75s total stacking time

ASI ZWO294MC Pro, gain 400, RGB24 space

Celestron 8" SCT with 0.63 reducer

Pixel scale 0.74 "/px

CPC alt/az mount

SharpCap 3.2 Pro capture software (as viewed, cropped and resized only using PS)

No darks, no flats

 

On 23-March I set up my 10" Dob and tried to find the comet visually.  Although I confirmed the surrounding star field, I could not detect the comet.

 

Two nights later I set up my CPC 800 and was able to visually observe the comet, barely, using a 14mm EP (140X).  Visually, I could make out the nucleus using averted vision, but no details.  I should mention that I live in a Bortle 7/8 zone and looking north is the worst direction for light pollution.

 

I put the camera and reducer on and found the comet immediately.  With 15s exposures, field rotation and tracking errors were not noticeable.  Stacking 5 frames (75s) was about as long as I could go without smearing the comet too bad.  The nucleus is easily visible, and a hint of coma going up and right in the frame. Up is south.

 

atlas-Y4-Stack_5frames_75s.jpg

 

 

 


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#5 SonnyE

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 03:05 PM

Last night (03-27-2020 Friday) was clear for me.

A beautiful night! Albeit a bit cold. (Any time it gets 60° or cooler in California, it's "freezing".)

 

So I took advantage to grab some more images. My originals are saved as tif format, so I save them for the web as gif format for posting to Cloudy Nights.

If you compare them, you can see the comet is moving in relation to the stars in the field.

I hope to get more chances to image it's passage. I don't think I will be around the next time it comes around in 6,000ish years. hmm.gif

My filing system is to make a folder for a given night, then save to it as I grab images from the skies.

I list as, Object, Number of exposures, amount of time each exposure is, and the total time of the stack of images. (Time is in seconds (s) I usually try to ramp up my time, and collect the same number. But the 45s set got away from me around dinner. blush.gif

I hope to make a video as things progress, if the skies will be friendly.

 

10 30s 300s

C2019 Y4  10 30s 300s
 
21 45s 945s
C2019 Y4  21 45s 945s

 

10 60s 600s
C2019 Y4 10 60s 600s

 

10 120s 1200s 1
C2019 Y4 10 120s 1200s 1

 

10 120s 1200s 2
C2019 Y4 10 120s 1200s 2

 

And I like to record my focusing star, Sirius, this night.
Sirius Focusing

 

 
In the last 1200s image, one of my overhead wires was coming into my image. gaah.gif  So I took that time to do a meridian flip.
But things went arye and I could not relocate the comet again. Even after a total redo of alignment and hunting. It shown to be a perfect targeting in Stellarium, and my routine way of finding objects. But I gave up after midnight. frown.gif
There will be another night... wink.gif

 


Edited by SonnyE, 28 March 2020 - 07:42 PM.

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#6 SonnyE

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 03:10 PM

Here is my contribution to the thread:

 

Observed 25-March-2020 UT 02:14:35 (10:14 pm EDT):from Lexington, KY (Bortle 7/8)

5 frames, 15s each, 75s total stacking time

ASI ZWO294MC Pro, gain 400, RGB24 space

Celestron 8" SCT with 0.63 reducer

Pixel scale 0.74 "/px

CPC alt/az mount

SharpCap 3.2 Pro capture software (as viewed, cropped and resized only using PS)

No darks, no flats

 

On 23-March I set up my 10" Dob and tried to find the comet visually.  Although I confirmed the surrounding star field, I could not detect the comet.

 

Two nights later I set up my CPC 800 and was able to visually observe the comet, barely, using a 14mm EP (140X).  Visually, I could make out the nucleus using averted vision, but no details.  I should mention that I live in a Bortle 7/8 zone and looking north is the worst direction for light pollution.

 

I put the camera and reducer on and found the comet immediately.  With 15s exposures, field rotation and tracking errors were not noticeable.  Stacking 5 frames (75s) was about as long as I could go without smearing the comet too bad.  The nucleus is easily visible, and a hint of coma going up and right in the frame. Up is south.

 

Very nice, Jim! grin.gif

Thank You for sharing your image.

I hope you can share more. waytogo.gif




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