Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Observer

dob
  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#1 Carlos823863

Carlos823863

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 03 Jan 2020

Posted 27 March 2020 - 02:03 AM

Hello, my name is Carlos I have recently bought a Apertura 10 inch Dobsonian DT10. I have been using the telescope in my backyard because its pretty dark for a suburban area. I have a 25mm plossl eyepiece and a celestron 3x. What i have been noticing is that the only nebula im able to see is orion M42, and that i cant see any galaxies from my dob, not even Andromeda. I have my finder scope aligned so when i point to any galaxy or nebula it doesn't come up not even a spec. My Dob is laser collimated and aligned. I have received my Oxygen lll filter but that didnt help at all for finding other nebulas or galaxies. I only saw 2 star clusters but i dont know their names. I would like to know if there is something wrong that im doing. This is the best picture  have of M42.0C0D9D3A-6C0A-4C9F-8B88-A4A0BD648047.jpeg  
And this (Idk the name)

B44AA817-D805-432F-B320-032912D692FB.jpeg


Edited by Carlos823863, 27 March 2020 - 02:47 AM.

  • steve t likes this

#2 Cloudkicker

Cloudkicker

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 3
  • Joined: 15 Jul 2019

Posted 27 March 2020 - 02:51 AM

Andromeda is harder to find than orion.  In a suburban area it's just going to look like a faint smudge or cloud in your telescope.   You can see it with your equipment though.   Are you using your finder scope?



#3 Carlos823863

Carlos823863

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 03 Jan 2020

Posted 27 March 2020 - 02:53 AM

Andromeda is harder to find than orion.  In a suburban area it's just going to look like a faint smudge or cloud in your telescope.   You can see it with your equipment though.   Are you using your finder scope?

Yes i do use my finder scope



#4 sg6

sg6

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7,312
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2010
  • Loc: Norfolk, UK.

Posted 27 March 2020 - 02:55 AM

Scope is 1250mm focal length. Widest view will be the 25mm Plossl (?), that is 50x and in a plossl that is a 1 degree view.

Mag = Scope FL/Eyepiece FL

Field = EP Field/Magn

 

As Andromeda is 3 degrees all you ever see is 1/3 of it, usually the rather fuzzy central roundish bit. You will NOT see all Andromeda. If you want to do that then a dark site and binoculars or a small 60-70mm scope <500mm focal length.

 

Nebula, actually cannot think of any other then M42. Everyone does M42 and over time you never want to read of M42 and see another image.

 

The Messier catalogue only has 7 and one is M42 and another is M43 which is basically a part of M42.

Try Triffid and Lagoon Nebula, both in Sagittarius.

 

What are you doing wrong?

Expecting things to appear in view, and maybe expecting bright easily seen and defined colored objects.

Usually called "expectations".

 

A dobsonian will take a few weeks to learn to use.

How many constellations do you know. Could you stand outside tonight, point someone at Hercules and say between those 2 stars sits M13, the great globular cluster?

If the answer is No, then you need to learn them. You need to know where objects are to find them.

 

Galaxies: M31 Andromeda as said binoculars.

Work out where M33 is and try that. There is a cluster at the rear end of Leo - Denebola and out a bit. Problem is they are all small. You will initially thing they are just stars, eventually you realise they are small disks.

 

Get a print of The Dipper and work out where the galaxies are in that bit of the UMa constellation - actually a few.

 

No galaxy is big and red/blue. All are small and a dim grey.


Edited by sg6, 27 March 2020 - 02:57 AM.


#5 Carlos823863

Carlos823863

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 03 Jan 2020

Posted 27 March 2020 - 02:57 AM

Scope is 1250mm focal length. Widest view will be the 25mm Plossl (?), that is 50x and in a plossl that is a 1 degree view.

Mag = Scope FL/Eyepiece FL

Field = EP Field/Magn

 

As Andromeda is 3 degrees all you ever see is 1/3 of it, usually the rather fuzzy central roundish bit. You will NOT see all Andromeda. If you want to do that then a dark site and binoculars or a small 60-70mm scope <500mm focal length.

 

Nebula, actually cannot think of any other then M42. Everyone does M42 and over time you never want to read of M42 and see another image.

 

The Messier catalogue only has 7 and one is M42 and another is M43 which is basically a part of M42.

Try Triffid and Lagoon Nebula, both in Sagittarius.

 

What are you doing wrong?

Expecting things to appear in view, and maybe expecting bright easily seen and defined colored objects.

Usually called "expectations".

 

A dobsonian will take a few weeks to learn to use.

How many constellations do you know. Could you stand outside tonight, point someone at Hercules and say between those 2 stars sits M13, the great globular cluster?

If the answer is No, then you need to learn them. You need to know where objects are to find them.

 

Galaxies: M31 Andromeda as said binoculars.

Work out where M33 is and try that. There is a cluster at the rear end of Leo - Denebola and out a bit. Problem is they are all small. You will initially thing they are just stars, eventually you realise they are small disks.

 

Get a print of The Dipper and work out where the galaxies are in that constellation - actually a few.

 

No galaxy is big and red/blue. All are small and a dim grey.

Thank you i will take note of that and study the constellations 



#6 sg6

sg6

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7,312
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2010
  • Loc: Norfolk, UK.

Posted 27 March 2020 - 03:32 AM

The thing is you have to know where to pont the scope. Oddly even if you have a goto you need to know - no one that owns a goto actually trusts the things, so they need to know where an object is in order to believe that the scope has some idea. Have you read the posts about goto's not getting the target? The people have to know before the things wanders off possibly randomly.

 

Easy constallations are Ursa Maj (the one with the Dipper in it) Leo, Auriga and Gemini at present. Gemini is not overly distinct.

 

Auriga has 3 open clusters that are easy. Leo has somewhere 3 galaxies along Leo's tummy. UMa has a few galaxies, again you have to work out where then aim scope and hope. There is a lot of hope in astronomy.

 

In a couple of months Lyra and Cygnus appear. M57 is in Lyra between the "bottom" 2 stars, should be findable.

 

Best way to figure out a constellation:

Stand outside with a laser pointer and trace the stars in the sky, or,

Do outreach, people have a rotten habit of asking questions, you are supposed to have the answers.

 

Exercise: Identify Auriga, finding Capella is easy it is the big bright star. Work out where 2 of the open clustrs are - easy cheat they are about the middle, then work out where the 3rd one should be. It is just outside the main lines of Auriga. Then try the scope. OK only 3 rather common open clusters, but should be easy. And take 20 minutes. If successful have a beer.

 

May be worth considering a 30mm plossl just for extra field. But a plossl may not work great in an f/4.5 scope.

 

Not sure where Hercules is at present.

 

Finding some constellations:

The Dipper start point:

The pointers point "up" to Polaris and Ursa Minor.

They equally point "down" to Leo.

The top 2 stars of the pan direct you left-to-right to Capella the bright star of Auriga. Slight wander across the sky but easy.

The dipper handle if you follow the arc shape directs you to Arcturus - big red star. That is the constellation Bootes. Not a really bright constellation. But another.



#7 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 16,813
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Pampanga, PI

Posted 27 March 2020 - 03:56 AM

...pretty dark for a suburban area.

 

I have a 25mm plossl eyepiece and a celestron 3x.

 

What i have been noticing is that the only nebula im able to see is orion M42, and that i cant see any galaxies from my dob, not even Andromeda.

 

I have received my Oxygen lll filter but that didnt help at all for finding other nebulas or galaxies.

Under pretty dark skies, you should see some brighter galaxies. Mostly just faint fuzzy patches. Until you get a lot of experience observing them, they can be difficult. 

 

You can see Orion pretty well with 25mm and 3x Barlow. Galaxies might be more difficult, except the brighter ones including Andromeda. 

 

When you use your finder to hit Orion nebula, is the nebula in the eyepiece FOV? If so, then the finder should be aligned well enough to find Andromeda and other big stuff. Other galaxies are a little more difficult to find. Star hopping to them is better. 

 

No, the OIII will not help on galaxies, but only make the field much darker. And the image, too. Don;t use a filter with galaxies. Try a low power with just 25mm and no 3x Barlow. 



#8 Napp

Napp

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,916
  • Joined: 26 Jul 2015
  • Loc: Florida, USA

Posted 27 March 2020 - 09:00 AM

Get a copy of “Turn Left at Orion”.  Great book to help find objects but also to show you what to expect.


  • Dave Mitsky and GeraldBelton like this

#9 Carlos823863

Carlos823863

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 03 Jan 2020

Posted 27 March 2020 - 11:14 AM

Scope is 1250mm focal length. Widest view will be the 25mm Plossl (?), that is 50x and in a plossl that is a 1 degree view.

Mag = Scope FL/Eyepiece FL

Field = EP Field/Magn

 

As Andromeda is 3 degrees all you ever see is 1/3 of it, usually the rather fuzzy central roundish bit. You will NOT see all Andromeda. If you want to do that then a dark site and binoculars or a small 60-70mm scope <500mm focal length.

 

Nebula, actually cannot think of any other then M42. Everyone does M42 and over time you never want to read of M42 and see another image.

 

The Messier catalogue only has 7 and one is M42 and another is M43 which is basically a part of M42.

Try Triffid and Lagoon Nebula, both in Sagittarius.

 

What are you doing wrong?

Expecting things to appear in view, and maybe expecting bright easily seen and defined colored objects.

Usually called "expectations".

 

A dobsonian will take a few weeks to learn to use.

How many constellations do you know. Could you stand outside tonight, point someone at Hercules and say between those 2 stars sits M13, the great globular cluster?

If the answer is No, then you need to learn them. You need to know where objects are to find them.

 

Galaxies: M31 Andromeda as said binoculars.

Work out where M33 is and try that. There is a cluster at the rear end of Leo - Denebola and out a bit. Problem is they are all small. You will initially thing they are just stars, eventually you realise they are small disks.

 

Get a print of The Dipper and work out where the galaxies are in that bit of the UMa constellation - actually a few.

 

No galaxy is big and red/blue. All are small and a dim grey.

Would you recommend these eyepieces as a good way to see more objects? 
https://agenaastro.c...-soft-case.html



#10 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 88,925
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 27 March 2020 - 11:18 AM

You may find some of the information on observing presented in my post (#22) at https://www.cloudyni...mers/?p=5184287 useful, Carlos823863.



#11 zleonis

zleonis

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 255
  • Joined: 27 Mar 2018
  • Loc: Richmond, VA

Posted 27 March 2020 - 12:05 PM

Hmm. The Andromeda Galaxy should be visible, although galaxies and bright nebulae suffer even in suburban skies. Are you able to see it without a telescope? Except in poor conditions, it's usually at least faintly visible. What other galaxies and nebulae have you targeted? The Orion Nebula is to my eyes the most spectacular nebula visible from mid-northern latitudes by a fair margin, so others might not quite measure up. As sg6 mentioned, there are some very nice nebulae in Sagittarius, which are pre-dawn objects this time of year. 

 

In my 8" dob from a reasonably dark suburban site, I can see many galaxies, but they are usually pretty subtle. I can often perceive (in order of ease/frequency) details like shape, orientation, gradations of brightness, a sharp margin or hints of a dust lane, and on a handful, with effort, hints of spiral structure (others with more experience and patience would doubtless see more). But rarely would these details stand out and needless to say they never look anything like even a poor astrophotograph.

 

Eyepieces won't change results dramatically, but the eyepiece I use most often for galaxies is an explore scientific 11mm 82 degree eyepiece. The magnification is usually well-suited to seeing galaxies, and the wide field of view makes it reasonably easy to get the object in the FOV with an optical finder (or even just a telrad/RDF). I haven't used the eyepieces in the set you're considering, but the  20mm and the 30mm would probably be too close to your 25mm eyepiece to be worth the investment. You might consider the 10mm on its own, although many observers prefer a wider apparent field of view, both for aesthetics and for ease in acquiring the object. 



#12 Carlos823863

Carlos823863

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 03 Jan 2020

Posted 27 March 2020 - 01:02 PM

Hmm. The Andromeda Galaxy should be visible, although galaxies and bright nebulae suffer even in suburban skies. Are you able to see it without a telescope? Except in poor conditions, it's usually at least faintly visible. What other galaxies and nebulae have you targeted? The Orion Nebula is to my eyes the most spectacular nebula visible from mid-northern latitudes by a fair margin, so others might not quite measure up. As sg6 mentioned, there are some very nice nebulae in Sagittarius, which are pre-dawn objects this time of year. 

 

In my 8" dob from a reasonably dark suburban site, I can see many galaxies, but they are usually pretty subtle. I can often perceive (in order of ease/frequency) details like shape, orientation, gradations of brightness, a sharp margin or hints of a dust lane, and on a handful, with effort, hints of spiral structure (others with more experience and patience would doubtless see more). But rarely would these details stand out and needless to say they never look anything like even a poor astrophotograph.

 

Eyepieces won't change results dramatically, but the eyepiece I use most often for galaxies is an explore scientific 11mm 82 degree eyepiece. The magnification is usually well-suited to seeing galaxies, and the wide field of view makes it reasonably easy to get the object in the FOV with an optical finder (or even just a telrad/RDF). I haven't used the eyepieces in the set you're considering, but the  20mm and the 30mm would probably be too close to your 25mm eyepiece to be worth the investment. You might consider the 10mm on its own, although many observers prefer a wider apparent field of view, both for aesthetics and for ease in acquiring the object. 

What eyepiece would you recommend to be the best for any nebula? 



#13 gwlee

gwlee

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,832
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2015
  • Loc: 38N 120W

Posted 27 March 2020 - 03:50 PM

Hello, my name is Carlos I have recently bought a Apertura 10 inch Dobsonian DT10. I have been using the telescope in my backyard because its pretty dark for a suburban area. I have a 25mm plossl eyepiece and a celestron 3x. What i have been noticing is that the only nebula im able to see is orion M42, and that i cant see any galaxies from my dob, not even Andromeda. I have my finder scope aligned so when i point to any galaxy or nebula it doesn't come up not even a spec. My Dob is laser collimated and aligned. I have received my Oxygen lll filter but that didnt help at all for finding other nebulas or galaxies. I only saw 2 star clusters but i dont know their names. I would like to know if there is something wrong that im doing. This is the best picture  have of M42.attachicon.gif0C0D9D3A-6C0A-4C9F-8B88-A4A0BD648047.jpeg 
And this (Idk the name)

attachicon.gifB44AA817-D805-432F-B320-032912D692FB.jpeg

Carlos,

 

Andromeda Galaxy is usually big enough and bright enough to be visible in a binocular even in a metro area with a lot of light pollution. Your photo of the Orion Nebula shows that your collimation is at least OK, so it’s equally likely that you aren’t pointing your scope at Andromeda, or you are seeing it, but expecting to see something more impressive than a very faint cotton ball. We all have this problem from time to time.

If you have a binocular, sugguest taking your time and hunting it down with the wide field of view of the binocular and an all-sky chart, then pointing your scope with 25mm Plossl where you pointed your binocular. Expect it to be less impressive than you expect. 


Edited by gwlee, 27 March 2020 - 03:55 PM.


#14 zleonis

zleonis

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 255
  • Joined: 27 Mar 2018
  • Loc: Richmond, VA

Posted 27 March 2020 - 09:35 PM

What eyepiece would you recommend to be the best for any nebula? 

There are different kinds of nebula. Some bright emission nebulae consisting of ionized gas excited by nearby stars are quite large, so a low-magnification eyepiece with a  wide field of view is helpful. Planetary nebula, the glowing remnants of stars the size of the sun or a bit bigger are much smaller and high magnification can be useful.

 

I can't recommend the best nebula eyepieces, but two that I've used with good results for large emission nebulae like the Orion Nebula are the 30mm GSO superview (also branded as Apertura or Zhumell). This eyepiece has an apparent field of view of 68 degrees or so, which is about a third again as much as your 25mm eyepiece. Although the stars towards the edge of the field will look smeared (like seagulls in flight is a common analogy), it gives nice views towards the center, and is fairly inexpensive as eyepieces go ($70 new, often available in the classifieds for $40-50 used.) I liked this eyepiece, but I decided to upgrade to an explore scientific 30mm 82 degree eyepiece. This has a noticeably larger field of view and much tighter stars towards the edge of the field. It costs $200 or a bit more used, and maybe $300 new. Both of these eyepieces would show a wider circle of sky than your 25mm eyepiece, but if you compared the view through your 25mm eyepiece with the central 50 degrees of either of these eyepieces, what you'd be able to see, nebula-wise, would be about the same I'd expect.

 

To see nebula more clearly, you might consider a narrowband filter. These filters block out most of the light except for a fairly narrow range of wavelengths emitted by ionized oxygen and hydrogen, so the filters greatly dim the background light, while dimming the nebula much less. This makes it easier to see details in many nebula. The filters come in 2" and 1.25" sizes, just like eyepieces, and screw into the back of the adapter or into the barrel of the eyepiece itself. I have an Orion Ultrablock filter, which is generally regarded as decent but not top of the line. I haven't compared it with other filters of this type. I don't use the filter every session, but it's given me some of my most memorable views through a telescope, of objects like the Veil supernova remnant in Cygnus or the Helix planetary nebula in Aquarius. 


Edited by zleonis, 27 March 2020 - 10:07 PM.


#15 Carlos823863

Carlos823863

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 03 Jan 2020

Posted 28 March 2020 - 02:08 AM

There are different kinds of nebula. Some bright emission nebulae consisting of ionized gas excited by nearby stars are quite large, so a low-magnification eyepiece with a  wide field of view is helpful. Planetary nebula, the glowing remnants of stars the size of the sun or a bit bigger are much smaller and high magnification can be useful.

 

I can't recommend the best nebula eyepieces, but two that I've used with good results for large emission nebulae like the Orion Nebula are the 30mm GSO superview (also branded as Apertura or Zhumell). This eyepiece has an apparent field of view of 68 degrees or so, which is about a third again as much as your 25mm eyepiece. Although the stars towards the edge of the field will look smeared (like seagulls in flight is a common analogy), it gives nice views towards the center, and is fairly inexpensive as eyepieces go ($70 new, often available in the classifieds for $40-50 used.) I liked this eyepiece, but I decided to upgrade to an explore scientific 30mm 82 degree eyepiece. This has a noticeably larger field of view and much tighter stars towards the edge of the field. It costs $200 or a bit more used, and maybe $300 new. Both of these eyepieces would show a wider circle of sky than your 25mm eyepiece, but if you compared the view through your 25mm eyepiece with the central 50 degrees of either of these eyepieces, what you'd be able to see, nebula-wise, would be about the same I'd expect.

 

To see nebula more clearly, you might consider a narrowband filter. These filters block out most of the light except for a fairly narrow range of wavelengths emitted by ionized oxygen and hydrogen, so the filters greatly dim the background light, while dimming the nebula much less. This makes it easier to see details in many nebula. The filters come in 2" and 1.25" sizes, just like eyepieces, and screw into the back of the adapter or into the barrel of the eyepiece itself. I have an Orion Ultrablock filter, which is generally regarded as decent but not top of the line. I haven't compared it with other filters of this type. I don't use the filter every session, but it's given me some of my most memorable views through a telescope, of objects like the Veil supernova remnant in Cygnus or the Helix planetary nebula in Aquarius. 

Where can i find a used Explore Scientific 82° 30mm Eyepiece?



#16 Napp

Napp

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,916
  • Joined: 26 Jul 2015
  • Loc: Florida, USA

Posted 28 March 2020 - 06:38 AM

Where can i find a used Explore Scientific 82° 30mm Eyepiece?

Monitor the Classifieds right here on Cloudy Nights.  They pop up regularly.  Some vendors like OPT sell used equipment.  Understand how heavy a 30mm ES82° ep is.  You may have to add a counterweight to the other end of the OTA.


Edited by Napp, 28 March 2020 - 06:40 AM.


#17 payner

payner

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,902
  • Joined: 22 Mar 2007
  • Loc: Bluegrass & Cumberland Valley Regions, Kentucky

Posted 28 March 2020 - 11:01 AM

There's an ES 30-mm 70-deg ocular in the classifieds now, if of interest. It is not mine and I do not know the seller.



#18 havasman

havasman

    Voyager 1

  • ****-
  • Posts: 10,491
  • Joined: 04 Aug 2013
  • Loc: Dallas, Texas

Posted 28 March 2020 - 02:04 PM

Hello Carlos834863

 

You have a very powerful and capable telescope that can show you many thousands of galaxies and nebulae from a good dark site. It can be very difficult to see these objects when you are starting out. I remember being so frustrated that I nearly gave up on the hobby entirely. But then I started seeing objects and here we are. Becoming an observer involves skill building just as becoming a skier or sailor or knitter does. The only way to build those skills is to observe and if you keep at it they will come.

 

You need a guide. I recommend a Sky & Telescope Pocket Sky Atlas and a planisphere. Those will show you where to look. You need some idea of what is to be seen. I recommend you check the sketching section of these forums where you can search for a member's depiction of their observation. Those are almost always more like what you will see than a photo is. You need an observing plan so you're not just panning around trying to spot something. I recommend you see this monthly forum string and take the Top 10 Binocular Objects as your task as they should be easily observed with your scope -  https://www.cloudyni...estial-events/ 

One very important bit you should pick up from that site is the value of observing objects that are currently well placed for observing. M31 (The Andromeda Galaxy) for instance is certainly not.

 

Bright double stars are great skill builders. Castor in Gemini is one very well placed now. Mizar in Ursa Major is another. Polaris is always available from N hemisphere. These can help you with finding, focusing, color detection and dimensional perception skills and are pretty to look at besides.

 

Yes, that Explore Scientific eyepiece kit seems to be a cost effective upgrade set of eyepieces for you. You could do much worse. You will need a balanced set of magnifications, fields of view and exit pupils to successfully observe the objects you seek and that set brings balance to you at reasonable cost.

 

As above, your O-III filter will kill any chance of seeing galaxies for a beginner but it will be valuable for increasing the apparent contrast of many nebulae and particularly planetary nebulae.

 

Hang in there. Please check back in with us to keep us involved in your development and aware of your progress. Best wishes for your observing!


Edited by havasman, 28 March 2020 - 02:27 PM.

  • Astro-Master likes this

#19 havasman

havasman

    Voyager 1

  • ****-
  • Posts: 10,491
  • Joined: 04 Aug 2013
  • Loc: Dallas, Texas

Posted 28 March 2020 - 02:10 PM

no one that owns a goto actually trusts the things

That is patently false to the point of being completely absurd.

 

But it is absolutely correct that every observer needs to know where to point their scopes. Push-to and go-to are both guides that can successfully provide that information and can also help an inexperienced amateur gain knowledge of how the sky is organized.

 

Hercules rises after midnight these days. We watched it do so last Tuesday night from the dark site, naked eye. Even Wikipedia can help you know that.


Edited by havasman, 28 March 2020 - 02:36 PM.


#20 NorthernlatAK

NorthernlatAK

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 875
  • Joined: 22 Sep 2018

Posted 28 March 2020 - 02:11 PM

No one has mentioned that Andromeda galaxy is not really visible right now, except maybe right before sunrise. That might be why you can't see it. It is favorably positioned in the fall.

Edited by NorthernlatAK, 28 March 2020 - 02:12 PM.


#21 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 88,925
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 28 March 2020 - 03:19 PM

No one has mentioned that Andromeda galaxy is not really visible right now, except maybe right before sunrise. That might be why you can't see it. It is favorably positioned in the fall.

M31 lies at an altitude of 15 degrees at 8:30 p.m. EDT tonight at my latitude of 40 degrees north so it is potentially visible from a dark site with a good western horizon.



#22 Carlos823863

Carlos823863

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 03 Jan 2020

Posted 29 March 2020 - 10:48 PM

I also took a picture of this, and i dont know the name please let me know the name of it if you can find it

https://ibb.co/j5qqjVz


Edited by Carlos823863, 29 March 2020 - 10:49 PM.


#23 NorthernlatAK

NorthernlatAK

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 875
  • Joined: 22 Sep 2018

Posted 29 March 2020 - 11:04 PM

M31 lies at an altitude of 15 degrees at 8:30 p.m. EDT tonight at my latitude of 40 degrees north so it is potentially visible from a dark site with a good western horizon.

It actually never sets (circumpolar) at my latitude but it's not favorable by any means.

#24 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 88,925
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 29 March 2020 - 11:15 PM

I also took a picture of this, and i dont know the name please let me know the name of it if you can find it

https://ibb.co/j5qqjVz

It's part of Messier 45, also known as M45, the Pleiades, the Seven Sisters, and Subaru.  Note the small right triangle of stars close to third-magnitude Alcyone, the brightest of the Pleiads.

https://twitter.com/...7036032/photo/1

 

https://in-the-sky.o...=TYC1800-2202-1

 



#25 Carlos823863

Carlos823863

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 03 Jan 2020

Posted 29 March 2020 - 11:17 PM

It's part of Messier 45 also known as M45, the Pleiades, the Seven Sisters, and Subaru.  Note the small right triangle of stars close to third-magnitude Alcyone, the brightest of the Pleiads.

https://twitter.com/...7036032/photo/1

 

Thank you, but do you also know the second one i have on my first quote? Here is one with most of the stars on it 

https://ibb.co/41b04TP


Edited by Carlos823863, 29 March 2020 - 11:19 PM.



CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: dob



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics