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Jupiter 2020-03-28: Accidental stereo pair

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#1 DMach

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 02:37 AM

After a stressful week, it was nice to be able to spend some relaxing time under the stars on Saturday morning with an old friend: Jupiter's Great Red Spot. And, after getting some sleep, I now have the energy to process the data.

It's the first time I've managed to capture the GRS this "season", due to a combination of long working hours and the limited capture window this early in the apparition.

As has been the case for my morning sessions so far this year, seeing was not great and Jupiter spent far more time out of focus than in focus. I imaged for over an hour and a half, but ultimately was unable to use the majority of the individual runs (only 14 out of 30 stacks were used).

Each of the images above was produced by de-rotating 7 separate image stacks in WinJUPOS. Each stacked image was produced using the top 15% of frames from a 2 minute capture @ 80fps average. Therefore each of the final images above contain around 10,000 frames of data. The final images are effectively 27 minutes apart from one another (UT 21:47 and 22:14).

Selection of stacked images for de-rotation was purely based on quality but, when I put them together as a montage, I thought to try viewing them as a "stereo pair". Amazingly, they seem to serve this purpose quite well!

(Question: what is the "ideal" time separation for a stereo pair, anyway?)

I'll upload two versions. The first version is for those who (like me) find it easier to view stereo images "crossed eyed":

Jupiter 2020-03-29 v1 stereo pair near 30pc bc.png

This is my first time attempting the stereo pair approach, however - C&C welcome, especially if anyone knows the optimal spacing etc.

(I've clearly spent too long looking at the image cross-eyed now ... can't focus properly on the keyboard!)

Edited by DMach, 29 March 2020 - 03:55 AM.

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#2 DMach

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 02:38 AM

And here's the version for those who prefer the "far sighted" approach:

 

Jupiter 2020-03-29 v1 stereo pair far 30pc bc.png

 


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#3 Tulloch

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 03:09 AM

Wow! You are certainly back in the groove, excellent image(s).

 

Andrew



#4 troyt

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 04:32 AM

Good Jupiter images Darren waytogo.gif



#5 Foc

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 07:33 AM

If the seeing was not great then your mastery surely was.  Great images!



#6 DMach

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 09:22 AM

Wow! You are certainly back in the groove, excellent image(s).

 

Andrew

Thanks Andrew!

 

Good Jupiter images Darren waytogo.gif

Thanks Troy :)

 

If the seeing was not great then your mastery surely was.  Great images!

Thanks Foc. Having never experienced seeing in other locales I can't be sure, but I suspect the seeing in the tropics is somewhat different in nature. The seeing effects are "slow" much of the time here, if that makes sense ... Saturday morning was a good example, where Jupiter would completely blur out of focus for extended periods. But in between there were brief periods where seeing would be relatively stable (blurring only slightly) allowing me to grab some decent frames.

 

Only a handful of times have I seen it look like rapid, boiling water (e.g. one night in the period after a thunderstorm, which is hardly surprising!).



#7 acasely

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Posted 30 March 2020 - 05:23 AM

I like it! Not sure what the optimal time would be (despite some familiarity with the method), but I suspect ideally it would be quite a short time gap for Jupiter, so that the rotation isn't so large. For me (a 'far-sighted' viewer), it was quite cone-shaped, a lot like any time I've tried something similar. Maybe something around 10mins time would be better so that Jupiter is somewhat more spherical in the 3D view? But whatever, I love it, and excellent images too smile.gif


Edited by acasely, 30 March 2020 - 05:24 AM.


#8 DMach

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Posted 30 March 2020 - 06:56 AM

I like it! Not sure what the optimal time would be (despite some familiarity with the method), but I suspect ideally it would be quite a short time gap for Jupiter, so that the rotation isn't so large. For me (a 'far-sighted' viewer), it was quite cone-shaped, a lot like any time I've tried something similar. Maybe something around 10mins time would be better so that Jupiter is somewhat more spherical in the 3D view? But whatever, I love it, and excellent images too smile.gif


Hadn't thought of the "cone shape" aspect ... thanks for the tip!


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