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Clavius, Tycho, Moretus, and Plato w/Vallis Alpes from 2017

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#1 Tom Glenn

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 02:56 AM

These are some images that I found on an old hard drive I was going through (I've had a bit of extra time these days, but not so many imaging opportunities).  These have never been posted, and represent some of my early imaging runs after purchasing my first astronomy camera, which was the ASI224mc.  Back then I imaged all the time, even if conditions were poor, and so most of the old files are garbage.  There are, however, some very good sets mixed in there, including this one.  These were taken with my C9.25 Edge HD, with the ASI224mc and a 2x Televue barlow on July 15, 2017.  I used a UV/IR cut filter, so the original image is in color, but I have converted the images here to B/W because of some annoying color fringing that I didn't care to deal with. 

 

The first image below is a mosaic of 2 panels.  You can quickly see how small the panels are, and why I now image the Moon with a much larger sensor!  Clavius and Tycho should be obvious to most, and Moretus is the prominent crater to the upper left of Clavius.  The central peak of Moretus is creating a sundial effect with its shadow.  I have accumulated many images of this region of the Moon, but it never gets old.  Definitely one of my favorite regions.  The image here is downsized to about 70% of the original size.  

 

The second image (in the next post) shows Plato, with many craterlets visible on its floor.  The orientation here is somewhat interesting, just by virtue of the way I had the camera rotated, and we have the appearance of looking up Vallis Alpes, which is starting to take on many long shadows as the sunset terminator approaches.  I downsized the image to about 85% of the original.  

 

Click for larger size. 

 

Moretus-Clavius-Tycho-07-15-2017-TG.jpg


Edited by Tom Glenn, 29 March 2020 - 04:23 AM.

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#2 Tom Glenn

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 02:57 AM

Click for larger size.

 

Plato-Vallis-Alpes-07-15-2017-TG.jpg


Edited by Tom Glenn, 29 March 2020 - 04:24 AM.

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#3 gfstallin

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 04:59 AM

Tiny sensor it may have been, but the camera, telescope, and imager acquitted themselves quite well. waytogo.gif

 

Random question for anyone - in the image above, spread between 10 and 12 o'clock north of Mons Pico (roughly centered on 46.62, -8.31), there appears to be either an odd crater chain or an irregular series of pits. Is this known to be a crater chain caused by impacts or are these perhaps volcanic in origin? It certainly doesn't look anything like the Davy or Albufeda crater chains. 

 

George



#4 aeroman4907

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 02:43 PM

I particularly like the image with Plato and Vallis Alpes and the lighting up the valley as well Tom.  I am surprised you resized the image down to 85%.  Any time you can clearly resolve the doublet crater near the center of Plato, you've managed quite a feat.  I think I would still enjoy seeing the 100% sized image, but I am sure you are just being very conservative on the presentation.


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#5 Tom Glenn

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Posted 30 March 2020 - 03:36 AM

Tiny sensor it may have been, but the camera, telescope, and imager acquitted themselves quite well. waytogo.gif

 

Random question for anyone - in the image above, spread between 10 and 12 o'clock north of Mons Pico (roughly centered on 46.62, -8.31), there appears to be either an odd crater chain or an irregular series of pits. Is this known to be a crater chain caused by impacts or are these perhaps volcanic in origin? It certainly doesn't look anything like the Davy or Albufeda crater chains. 

 

George

George, thanks.  Regarding the crater chain you mention, shown below is the region from the LRO Quickmap.  I don't have any official information, but to me, they look like impact craters, possibly from the breakup of the impactor that created Pico C or G, which flank the feature on the east and west. 

 

LRO-closeup-Mons-Pico.jpg


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#6 Tom Glenn

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Posted 30 March 2020 - 03:39 AM

I particularly like the image with Plato and Vallis Alpes and the lighting up the valley as well Tom.  I am surprised you resized the image down to 85%.  Any time you can clearly resolve the doublet crater near the center of Plato, you've managed quite a feat.  I think I would still enjoy seeing the 100% sized image, but I am sure you are just being very conservative on the presentation.

Steve, thanks.  The downsizing is somewhat arbitrary, but after loading the full sized file, I didn't like how large it displayed in the web browser when opened.  Call me a stickler for details.  I typically find that images look their best when they are sized just enough to show the desired level of detail, but no more.  Shown below is the full sized image.  It will probably look identical to the previous version, just a tiny bit larger if you click it.  

 

Plato-Vallis-Alpes-07-15-2017-TG-fullsize.jpg


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#7 Tom Glenn

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Posted 30 March 2020 - 03:47 AM

Also, this begs the question of what was the image scale.  This image was taken in 2017, when I was first learning how to image properly.  I paid no attention to back focus, or a variety of other considerations regarding spacing in the imaging train.  Fortunately, the method I have delineated using WinJUPOS to measure the image scale works perfectly here.  This method uses locations with known latitude and longitude to calibrate your image, and was described here.

 

 https://www.cloudyni...eference-frame/

 

Using that method here, I can align this image easily.

 

Plato-reference-alignment-TG.jpg

 

The measured image scale is 0.175"/px, which indicates that my focal length was coming in significantly shorter than expected, due to my very short back focus.  

 

And since I had WinJUPOS already up and running, here is the stereographic polar projection of the image.  Click for larger size!

 

Plato-stereographic-projection-TG.jpg


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