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What do YOU love about your refractor?

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84 replies to this topic

#51 j.gardavsky

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 10:59 AM

Reflecting about the refractors,

their reflecting diagonal mirrors,

are what I like

 

JG


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#52 Eric H

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 11:21 AM

What is the size of the focuser on that scope? 

It's a 4" Astro-Physics focuser.


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#53 Astroman007

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 01:46 PM

It's a 4" Astro-Physics focuser.

That must be the queen of astroimaging instruments!


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#54 Eric H

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 02:01 PM

That must be the queen of astroimaging instruments!

I hope so. Haven't used it yet for AP. Had to have an adapter made to fit a flatenner and then the weather has been horrible. Hopefully will get a chance soon to test it all out.


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#55 Jacques

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 02:04 PM

"What do you love about your refractor?"

 

Image esthetics smile.gif

 

ED150 cooling for the night

 

 

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#56 barbie

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 05:10 PM

I like the fact that both of my 3" apos are easy to setup on a moment's notice and are highly portable. Both of their objectives are essentially perfect in figure and polish. Mechanicals are superb as well!!


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#57 Corcaroli78

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Posted 06 April 2020 - 04:06 AM

Wonderful thread,

 

It is very interesting to read what we like from our scopes. What i like from mine (despite the small aperture), is its amazing sharpness.

 

20200320_195904.jpg

 

Keep enjoying our refractors!!

 

Carlos

 


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#58 MarkGregory

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Posted 06 April 2020 - 04:36 AM

 

Wonderful thread,

 

It is very interesting to read what we like from our scopes. What i like from mine (despite the small aperture), is its amazing sharpness.

 

 

 

Keep enjoying our refractors!!

 

Carlos

 

Ya know, growing up, and even now, whenever I think of “telescope” it is a long tube refactor like yours. Just so classic. Mark


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#59 25585

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Posted 06 April 2020 - 05:06 AM

It was not until the TV Genesis I really liked refractors & had a use for them. Small apertures closer to binoculars, small AFOV eyepieces apart from a few Erfles, and long focal lengths made manual tracking & seeing much deep sky difficult.

 

The Genesis 500mm & Panoramic mount was the first grab & go, easy use rich field refractor, with a 2" focuser. It launched my interest & kept it while bigger scopes were sidelined through life changes.

 

SDF & later TV Petzvals are on my watch list always, but not many pre-owned around where I live, new NPs being too expensive for a 4".      


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#60 cupton

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Posted 06 April 2020 - 08:15 AM

What I love about MY refractor is how fast I can go from thinking about taking it out till I'm actually at the eyepiece viewing. Literally on a moments notice. I think it takes more time to take all the dang caps off the scope and finder than it does to get it out the door and in place. It does exactly what I purchased it for, which was to be a compliment to my Mak which takes a little more planning to use.


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#61 jcj380

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Posted 06 April 2020 - 08:33 AM

It does exactly what I purchased it for, which was to be a compliment to my Mak which takes a little more planning to use.

LOL.  I just bought a Mak to complement my frac.


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#62 oldmanastro

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Posted 06 April 2020 - 09:04 AM

I can take it out and have it ready in minutes. There's not a worry about collimation. The optics are as good as they get. Minimal chromatic aberration at f/16. Sharp clear images. No worries about re-coating anything. Nice smooth movements. Most important... It looks really good at 55! smile.gif

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#63 jcj380

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Posted 07 April 2020 - 05:09 AM

Wow.  Looks like my second scope, a Sears frac from 1967 or so, down to the chain on the tripod and the funky EP tray light.


Edited by jcj380, 07 April 2020 - 05:09 AM.

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#64 MarkGregory

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Posted 07 April 2020 - 05:32 AM

I can take it out and have it ready in minutes. There's not a worry about collimation. The optics are as good as they get. Minimal chromatic aberration at f/16. Sharp clear images. No worries about re-coating anything. Nice smooth movements. Most important... It looks really good at 55! smile.gif

Absolutely love it.


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#65 oldmanastro

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Posted 07 April 2020 - 09:14 AM

Wow.  Looks like my second scope, a Sears frac from 1967 or so, down to the chain on the tripod and the funky EP tray light.

It is in fact from 1966 and will turn 55 next Christmas. I wrote an article about it for CN in 2010 when I finished its restoration. Here's a page from the 1965 Sears catalog showing their astronomical telescope lineup. This one is the second from left. Originally made by Royal Astro Optical of Japan and sold under the Scope brand by Sears.

 

Guido

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#66 MarkGregory

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Posted 07 April 2020 - 09:27 AM

It is in fact from 1966 and will turn 55 next Christmas. I wrote an article about it for CN in 2010 when I finished its restoration. Here's a page from the 1965 Sears catalog showing their astronomical telescope lineup. This one is the second from left. Originally made by Royal Astro Optical of Japan and sold under the Scope brand by Sears.

 

Guido

Is your article still available for reading on CN? If not, can you post it so we can read it? Thanks, Mark



#67 Tank

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Posted 09 April 2020 - 02:47 PM

Big and dosen't need any Counter Weights smile.gif

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Edited by Tank, 09 April 2020 - 02:47 PM.

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#68 The Luckster

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Posted 10 April 2020 - 09:25 PM

What really appeals to me regarding refractor telescopes is what I consider it's purity; purity in both the optical path from objective to the ocular, and the purity in the observations (as in this is how it all started with optical aides).

 

CSS

 

jason


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#69 Rustler46

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Posted 11 April 2020 - 01:18 AM

Big and dosen't need any Counter Weights smile.gif

That's an amazing G-11 you have there. Mine with Gemini-1 complains with most any small to medium imbalance. It sort of makes straining sounds as gears work harder, and the hand controller says "RA Motor Lags".  I doubt if it would work at all without a counterweight and shaft.

 

Rusty



#70 jcj380

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Posted 11 April 2020 - 05:23 AM

It is in fact from 1966 and will turn 55 next Christmas. I wrote an article about it for CN in 2010 when I finished its restoration. Here's a page from the 1965 Sears catalog showing their astronomical telescope lineup. This one is the second from left. Originally made by Royal Astro Optical of Japan and sold under the Scope brand by Sears.

 

Guido

I believe my first scope was number 4, but my memory is fuzzier on that.



#71 precaud

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Posted 11 April 2020 - 02:55 PM

"What do you love about your refractor?"

 

That I don't walk away from a session wishing it were better, or different, than it is.


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#72 chazcheese

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Posted 15 April 2020 - 12:47 AM

I love the absolute ease of setup and viewing. If I'm going to spend more than a couple hours but am too lazy to setup the gems I'll take the Vixen 80 EDsf out. 

If just for an hour I'll take the Orion ST-80 or my recently purchased Orion ST-102 f5.9 for wide field of view. 

There is little to rival M-31 from a truly dark sky site in the ST-80 with a 32mm plossel, but I'm itching to use the 102 to compare.

I can use any of the above on a Vixen porta mount, or the ST80 on a good Photo setup.

But when at a dark sky site I have to use a gem with tracking. I lose all track of time looking at diamonds on black velvet using any of my refractors, especially the ED's.

Makes you feel small. shocked.gif bow.gif 


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#73 SonnyE

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Posted 15 April 2020 - 02:04 AM

Well, I'm just a pup at this compared to most.

But, I was drawn in by The Great Orion Nebula, through a 20-60X Redfield Spotting scope. Very exciting when I found it.

My wife didn't understand, and still doesn't.

 

I spent the better part of a month trying to talk myself out of wanting to image Nebulae.

After I decided I wanted to take my own images, I spent over 4 months of intensive study on how.

My first peek behind the curtain was at Celestron's 6" Achromatic, on an AVX.

Not the right scope for my endeavors, but it told of what was to come.

 

As I mined down about how to get what I wanted, it occurred to me I was looking for a camera lens.

And how were others doing what I wanted to attempt?

Down the Rabbit Hole after triplet APO refractors I ran head first. There weren't a lot of choices in a retirement budget, and having to outlay for all of it at once.

I put my trust in names I knew all of my life. First mistake.

I learned about construction, and Carbon Fiber holding it's focus best over temperature changes during the night.

 

In the end, I chose my Orion ED 80T CF, in part because the next step up was a 100T, but at an additional $1700 over the $1,000 for the ED80T. I could bite the bullet for the $1000 80, but not the $2700 100.

As a DSO Nebula imager, I can say I love my ED80T CF, It does what I ask of it. And since a friend talked me into trying one of his Atik Infinity Camera's (OSC), the Universe opened up to me.

My 4+ months of studying how to reach the objects I wanted payed off. And I love my little pea shooter telescope.

 

I don't need a 55 gallon light bucket to be content. Just my little Galileo Galilei refractor, modern version. Bringin home pictures of what I've never seen before.

 

Yeah. Contentment.

I always find myself set up and waiting before the stars come out. Like a wide eyed kid, anticipating what I might find, if I don't already have a target I'm after.

But I like to settle in on my victims, then suck the light out of them.

 

Oh yeah, you wanted a picture...

 

Losmandy 1w


Edited by SonnyE, 15 April 2020 - 02:15 AM.

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#74 MarkGregory

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Posted 15 April 2020 - 02:54 AM

 

Well, I'm just a pup at this compared to most.

But, I was drawn in by The Great Orion Nebula, through a 20-60X Redfield Spotting scope. Very exciting when I found it.

My wife didn't understand, and still doesn't.

 

I spent the better part of a month trying to talk myself out of wanting to image Nebulae.

After I decided I wanted to take my own images, I spent over 4 months of intensive study on how.

My first peek behind the curtain was at Celestron's 6" Achromatic, on an AVX.

Not the right scope for my endeavors, but it told of what was to come.

 

As I mined down about how to get what I wanted, it occurred to me I was looking for a camera lens.

And how were others doing what I wanted to attempt?

Down the Rabbit Hole after triplet APO refractors I ran head first. There weren't a lot of choices in a retirement budget, and having to outlay for all of it at once.

I put my trust in names I knew all of my life. First mistake.

I learned about construction, and Carbon Fiber holding it's focus best over temperature changes during the night.

 

In the end, I chose my Orion ED 80T CF, in part because the next step up was a 100T, but at an additional $1700 over the $1,000 for the ED80T. I could bite the bullet for the $1000 80, but not the $2700 100.

As a DSO Nebula imager, I can say I love my ED80T CF, It does what I ask of it. And since a friend talked me into trying one of his Atik Infinity Camera's (OSC), the Universe opened up to me.

My 4+ months of studying how to reach the objects I wanted payed off. And I love my little pea shooter telescope.

 

I don't need a 55 gallon light bucket to be content. Just my little Galileo Galilei refractor, modern version. Bringin home pictures of what I've never seen before.

 

Yeah. Contentment.

I always find myself set up and waiting before the stars come out. Like a wide eyed kid, anticipating what I might find, if I don't already have a target I'm after.

But I like to settle in on my victims, then suck the light out of them.

 

Oh yeah, you wanted a picture...

 

Wow, that was quite a story. Can feel the love. 👍



#75 bobhen

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Posted 15 April 2020 - 10:08 AM

It is in fact from 1966 and will turn 55 next Christmas. I wrote an article about it for CN in 2010 when I finished its restoration. Here's a page from the 1965 Sears catalog showing their astronomical telescope lineup. This one is the second from left. Originally made by Royal Astro Optical of Japan and sold under the Scope brand by Sears.

 

Guido

My first refractor was number 4 on the far right. I got it for Christmas when I was 13.

 

Nice to see that page.

 

Bob




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