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Stellarium: sensor frame rotated 90 degrees

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#1 maxsid

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 12:12 AM

Hello,

This is true for all sensors configured in my instance of Stellarium (currently 0.20.0.1 Windows 64b). Tried a fresh install on a different PC with default sensors - same story.

Either I got confused somewhere or missing something or it's a bug or a feature.

 

If a sensor is configured like so (default):

Resolution X: long  side e.g. 6000 pixels

Resolution Y: short side e.g. 4000 pixels

Chip width  : long  side e.g. 24 mm

Chip height : short side e.g. 16 mm

Then the sensor frame shown in Stellarium is rotated by -90 degrees with respect to what I actually get on my camera.

 

So, I have to tell Stellarium to rotate the sensor by -90 degrees or configure the sensor like so:

Resolution X: short side e.g. 4000 pixels

Resolution Y: long  side e.g. 6000 pixels

Chip width  : short side e.g. 16 mm

Chip height : long  side e.g. 24 mm

 

Stellarium default:

stellarium-norot-sm.JPG

 

Actual image:

camera-sm.JPG

 

Stellarium rotated (matches the actual image):

stellarium-sm.JPG

 

Is this just me?

Thanks!

 

Image: modded Nikon D5500 with IDAS LPS-D1 filter. Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 @ 75 mm. Rosette and Christmas Tree/Cone.


Edited by maxsid, 02 April 2020 - 12:30 AM.


#2 Alexander Wolf

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 03:04 AM

It's may be strange, but what about physical orientation of camera on mount?



#3 maxsid

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 03:09 AM

Of course, camera is not rotated. And this applies to DSLR and to CCD too.


Edited by maxsid, 02 April 2020 - 03:31 AM.


#4 Alexander Wolf

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 05:29 AM

Are you use azimuthal mount for camera?



#5 maxsid

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 04:03 PM

Equatorial



#6 NGC 2419

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 04:18 PM

...
Is this just me?
Thanks!
...

No. I noticed this some time ago and thought maybe I was doing something wrong. I just rotate everything 90° and call it good.

Now if you want to see that sensor frame do some really weird stuff, try framing Polaris.

Clear skies!

Edit to add that I know why the Polaris thing happens, it just caught me off guard the first time I saw it.

Edited by NGC 2419, 02 April 2020 - 04:40 PM.


#7 maxsid

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 04:39 PM

Ah.. OK. It's a "feature" then...

Polaris is a different story though. It's like using a compass close to the north pole.. Any direction will be south.

Thanks!




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