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#1 MrGuGuZai

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 09:34 AM

I wonder if observing star or planet in equator country is different from north hemisphere or south?



#2 Jim Davis

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 09:40 AM

The stars will look the same. The only difference in planets would be moon events that you may see at a different angle than other places on Earth. An example would be a Jupiter moon transit. The transit may start or stop at a different time depending on your location on Earth.

 

If you want to see what it is like, download and install the program Stellarium. You can set your location to various places on Earth and see how the sky looks different.



#3 Myk Rian

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 09:44 AM

You would see something at zenith, I would see it at 43ยบ from my S horizon.


Edited by Myk Rian, 04 April 2020 - 09:47 AM.

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#4 Tony Flanders

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 10:20 AM

The tropics are generally the best place to observe the planets, because it's where the planets are most likely to be either overhead or very high in the sky, with the least amount of air between you and them.

 

That's for the same reason that the Sun is most likely to be overhead or very high in the sky. The planets follow the same path through the "fixed" stars that the Sun does.

 

Likewise, the closer you are to the equator, the more of the celestial sphere you can see. At the North Pole, you can only see half of the sky -- the same half, in every season. Likewise at the South Pole, except there you're seeing the other half of the sky. But at the equator you can (in theory) see everything.

 

On the flip side, the weather in the equatorial zone tends to be cloudy. That's why most professional observatories are located just outside the tropics, in the desert zone that extends roughly from 20 to 35 degrees latitude in both hemispheres.


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#5 JamesMStephens

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 10:39 AM

I spent a little time in Brazil--mostly offshore doing seismic survey--tweenty years ago, now.  (Can't believe it's been so long!)  On deck at night the skies were beautiful, as the often are at see, and id was neat to see Orion "upside down."

 

Jim




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