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First telescope for astrophotography

astrophotography beginner
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#1 Vetle

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 03:56 PM

Hello. I'm currently saving for my first telescope wich I'm looking to buy for next season. So I come here for advice if anyone would share their wisdom.

 

- I live in Norway outside a small city with 600 yards to next neighbour so it is pretty dark.

- I'm looking to spend in the range of $10 000 - $20 000 for the setup. (I rather use more time to save for something I feel great about then get something that I need to replace quick)

- My goal is to take astrophotography of galaxys and nebulas.

 

So when I first started to look for telescopes I found the Esprit 150 from Skywatcher that looked interesting as an all around decent scope. Tho after more digging I came over the Ritchey Chretien 20 inch wich looked like a great scope for galaxys. https://www.teleskop...ucts_id=7545#cs

 

Are there anything else someone would consider or is it something I have missed when looking for telescopes?



#2 guidoforrier

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 04:19 PM

Hi,

what i read about the RC 20" :The TS 20" f/8 Ritchey-Chr├ętien astrograph is a ultimate telescope for astrophotography. The scope is perfect for bigger observatories.

http://apm-telescope...em/313139333632

did you  notice the weight ?

the scope is only a part of the setup and a strong mount will cost you a lot :

http://www.alluna-op...rie-mounts.html

and that is not the end of the story .

Guido


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#3 Hesiod

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 04:24 PM

Well, between 1000 and 4000mm there are many, many options but I would start from the mount.

To handle something like the 20" you need an observatory-class mount and you have to be prepared for a very steep learning curve; also, even by purchasing a large format sensor (which would be outside your budget if it is for the whole setup), will be struck with a rather narrow field of view, forcing you to resort to the time-eating mosaic technique to deal with larger objects.

 

While galaxies are for the most small (there are only two requiring fovs bigger than 1┬░ for the northern hemisphere), but nebulae range across a huge spectrum from few minutes to several degrees: after all imaging deep sky objects is just like imaging terrestrial targets so to be able to take pictures of everything you would need several "lenses"


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#4 bobzeq25

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 04:33 PM

Hello. I'm currently saving for my first telescope wich I'm looking to buy for next season. So I come here for advice if anyone would share their wisdom.

 

- I live in Norway outside a small city with 600 yards to next neighbour so it is pretty dark.

- I'm looking to spend in the range of $10 000 - $20 000 for the setup. (I rather use more time to save for something I feel great about then get something that I need to replace quick)

- My goal is to take astrophotography of galaxys and nebulas.

 

So when I first started to look for telescopes I found the Esprit 150 from Skywatcher that looked interesting as an all around decent scope. Tho after more digging I came over the Ritchey Chretien 20 inch wich looked like a great scope for galaxys. https://www.teleskop...ucts_id=7545#cs

 

Are there anything else someone would consider or is it something I have missed when looking for telescopes?

Wisdom.  Look at the number of my posts, and I've collected many "likes".

 

You've missed at least two vital things.

 

Here's the _absolutely crucial_ point.  The best setup for _learning_ astrophotograhy is not the best setup for doing astrophotography.  That may seem unintuitive, but it's oh so true.

 

Maybe a useful analogy.  You wouldn't want your teen age child to learn driving on a Formula One car.

 

Read these quotes from people who've been there and done that.  Look at the emphasis on learning.   This is the truth.

 

"I regret spending the first 6 months trying to learn imaging with an 8" Edge on an AVX mount. I lucked out and got one of the good AVX's, but with that scope/mount combo it was a losing effort. Fortunately got a nice little refractor, and not only have the quality of my images improved but I'm actually enjoying the process of learning how to do it!"

 

"Of all the recommendations though, if you want to get into imaging then a short imaging refractor is probably the best one (IMHO).  I have a C8 and this was the scope I learned AP on.  It was a long, tough struggle and I have no good pictures to show for it.  I could have easily saved a year by starting with a more image-friendly scope."

 

"I started out with a CPC 800 on a heavy duty wedge and a Canon 450d.  In hindsight, I'd have started with an 80mm refractor.  I would have saved a lot of money and gotten up the learning curve a lot quicker."

 

I have _many_ of those, collected to advise beginners.  Just one more from a _very_ talented beginner.

 

"First and foremost is listen to the folks who have been there. The philosophy of 80MM APO and good $1500-2000 mount is great advice for beginners. Sure you can possibly <learn to> image as a beginner with something that is larger or that you may have but holy cow its hard enough with something small."

 

Holy cow, it is.  <smile>

 

Second _crucial_ point.  The mount is the most important part of an imaging setup, not the scope (or the camera).  As I said, unintuitive.  If you want to spend that kind of money, the first place to spend it is on a Paramount mount, or a 10Micron, or an AP.  These are the mounts most every imager would like, if their pockets were deep enough.  Visual observers have aperture envy, imagers have mount envy.  <smile>

 

The antidote to the unintuitive nature of DSO AP is knowledge.  You'll never get enough here.  This book will give you a great start (my bookshelf is very extensive).

 

https://www.amazon.c.../dp/0999470906/

 

Have patience.  The pretty pictures do not come easy.  In five years extensive study and imaging have gotten me to a bit above average. 

 

Throwing money at it does not guarantee success.  Equipment (provided you don't get too cheap a mount, or too big a scope) counts less than most beginners think.  Another analogy.  Rory McIlroy's clubs will not put you on the PGA tour.  <grin>

 

Minor point.  "First scope" is the right idea.  Most everyone replaces or augments their initial scope.  You can't short circuit that by spending a lot of money.  This would be in your philosophy.  A _great_ scope to learn on, that will later be your wide angle scope for big targets.  Most every serious imager has more than one scope, to do otherwise would be like being a professional photographer with one lens.

 

https://www.stellarv...plet-refractor/

 

An excellent field flattener is included.


Edited by bobzeq25, 04 April 2020 - 04:48 PM.

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#5 TinySpeck

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 04:55 PM

@bobzeq25 says it all!  I clicked "Like" twenty times but it only registered one.  grin.gif   You've got a nice big budget there, keep most of it in the bank and get a good beginner's mount and scope, and you can sell it later when you're ready to upgrade.  It's a long and complicated journey to learn astrophotography and what you like, and you don't want to pen yourself in early.


Edited by TinySpeck, 04 April 2020 - 04:58 PM.

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#6 David_Ritter

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 04:58 PM

I agree with the above - bobzeq25 and Gerrit are right.


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#7 slepage

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 04:58 PM

The above post by bobzeq25 could not be more correct.  Enjoy the journey and don't worry about the end point.  If you want to know where to throw your money at, do it on the mount.  That is about the only thing that can help a beginner to have an easier time going through the learning curve.  A large aperture scope will be a sure fire way to create frustration for a beginner.  A 80 to 100mm scope is perfect to start out with and maybe even end with as many seasoned people never leave widefield, or they own one concurrently with a longer focal length scope, or they have sold off their longer focal length scope and have gone to widefield.

 

Steve.


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#8 Vetle

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 05:27 PM

Thanks for all your help. I can see I have taken water over my head here. I will take your advice and buy a smaller apochromatic refractor and put money on mount and in stocks to save for later equipment. smile.gif

 

bobzeq25 I actually did already buy Rory's irons last fall lol.gif


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#9 bobzeq25

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 07:00 PM

 

 

bobzeq25 I actually did already buy Rory's irons last fall lol.gif

Best response ever.  <grin>  I really needed the laugh today.

 

Thanks.
 




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