Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Australian Film Astrophotography

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 SMigol

SMigol

    Messenger

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 403
  • Joined: 30 Jul 2010
  • Loc: California, USA

Posted 27 April 2020 - 09:58 AM

Saw this linked from PetaPixel.  

 

Seems to be one more of us!

 

https://petapixel.co...um-format-film/

 


  • Eric P, Nightfly, Todd N and 3 others like this

#2 Nightfly

Nightfly

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,302
  • Joined: 20 Jun 2007
  • Loc: Dark Skies, Maine

Posted 29 April 2020 - 05:16 PM

I bumped into Jason on the FB Medium Format forum.  This article reveals even more of his work.  Interesting results with Ektar 100.  Thanks for posting Stephen.   I had not seen the article.



#3 Euphonia

Euphonia

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 26 Jan 2015

Posted 15 May 2020 - 01:15 AM

I really like this. It's a wonderful combination of best of both worlds.

There's a certain tangible honesty about a single shot analog image. It's easier to connect and relate to somehow.

 

As per usual, yes digital can get a more technical image, and yes it's the tools you use etc, and yes scientific use would probably not use analog film.

 

Still... This cuts through the crowd and speaks directly on a more emotional level.



#4 TxStars

TxStars

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,985
  • Joined: 01 Oct 2005
  • Loc: Lost In Space

Posted 15 May 2020 - 09:42 AM

@Euphoria

heh, heh lol.gif

I'm fairly sure film astrophotography was used for scientific study long before the digital revolution..

SN and comet discoveries among other things can still be done using film..


Edited by TxStars, 15 May 2020 - 09:46 AM.


#5 Alen K

Alen K

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,366
  • Joined: 25 Nov 2009

Posted 17 May 2020 - 12:42 PM

There's nothing dishonest about stacking multiple exposures. Do remember that film astrophotographers were often doing this too, just with far fewer images. (I have done it myself.)

Generally speaking, it is getting increasingly harder to get long single shots without satellite and airplane trails. That will only get worse (although with Covid-19 air traffic has temporarily fallen by 95%).

The wider (and longer exposure) the shot, the more potential for trails. But even telephoto shots can suffer. For example, fairly recent shots I took of Orion with a 100mm lens show multiple trails from geosynchronous satellites. Lots of shorter exposures allow all trails to be automatically removed. With long single exposures you need to clone them out.

Regarding comet discovery, good luck with that. Have you noticed the dearth of human last names for comets in the last few years? It's because automated survey telescopes are finding almost all of them when they are very faint before anyone else gets a chance. Film will not improve human chances against machines.


Edited by Alen K, 17 May 2020 - 10:28 PM.


#6 Joe F Gafford

Joe F Gafford

    Skylab

  • ****-
  • Posts: 4,187
  • Joined: 15 Dec 2006
  • Loc: Denver, Colorado, US

Posted 19 May 2020 - 02:50 AM

I really like this. It's a wonderful combination of best of both worlds.

There's a certain tangible honesty about a single shot analog image. It's easier to connect and relate to somehow.

 

As per usual, yes digital can get a more technical image, and yes it's the tools you use etc, and yes scientific use would probably not use analog film.

 

Still... This cuts through the crowd and speaks directly on a more emotional level.

  In the 33 years I did film astrophotography, the film images had their problems. The color emulsions with their 3 layer planes with their different reciprocity and band sensitivity curves cause color shifts with the change of the emulsion meant for public use. The central area in M27 was mostly green or yellow depending which emulsion I used. This area on CCD and the better filters shows a light turquoise of the OIII emissions. The special B&W films with their response curves as some were blue sensitive, others were red sensitive. Some B&W films were very contrast-y due to the reciprocity roll-off was steep, some of those were cured by a cold camera with dry ice or liquid nitrogen behind the film backing or to hydrogen purge the film of latent moisture with forming gas under heat and pressure before using. I did the latter once with good results. The film got better after that but were changed or dropped due to the digital cameras and professional CCD chips being more popular.

  The old professionals used film as context for the pretty shots or to find supernovae, new objects, comets, moons and asteroids. The spectral films for spectra was the most informing thing that film was used for. Still is for CCD and some CMOS detectors. A lot of information of an object can be gleaned from their spectra.

 

A rogues' gallery of M-27 over the years with the different film emulsions and 2 different filter sets on the CCD camera. Both scopes described below. Larger image

M27-Rogues-GalleryAa_Web.jpg

 

Joe


Edited by Joe F Gafford, 19 May 2020 - 03:05 AM.

  • Eric P, SMigol, checcocpb and 1 other like this

#7 checcocpb

checcocpb

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 65
  • Joined: 29 Mar 2017
  • Loc: Italy

Posted 27 May 2020 - 09:52 AM

Joe, very interesting collection of different representations of the same object. A very insightful view, thanks for sharing.


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics