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largest shergottite!

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#1 stonesnuffer

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Posted 04 May 2020 - 03:10 PM

Hi everyone, i have come across a very very rare find indeed. I have found a 27 kilo shergottite with fusioncrust remnants. I can't believe it, i was dug up at a sand/gravel plant and ended up in someones garden where i spotted it. LUCKY Find.

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#2 Glassthrower

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Posted 04 May 2020 - 03:24 PM

This is not a meteorite.

 

What on Earth even made you suspect that it was?

 

Nothing about it is remotely suggestive of a meteorite, less yet a Martian.

 


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#3 stonesnuffer

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Posted 04 May 2020 - 03:47 PM

This is not a meteorite.

 

What on Earth even made you suspect that it was?

 

Nothing about it is remotely suggestive of a meteorite, less yet a Martian.

you can't see the details on the photo but this one has defenitive fusioncrust.And the crystalazation is exact like shergottite i wish i could make super closeups but i can't but trust me this is the real thing. I know it's pretty mind blowing.



#4 stonesnuffer

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Posted 04 May 2020 - 03:51 PM

this is the most closeup

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#5 Glassthrower

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Posted 04 May 2020 - 04:44 PM

This is a terrestrial rock.


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#6 stonesnuffer

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 04:17 AM

This is a terrestrial rock.

i have seen the parts of my rock that have fusioncrust (primairy/secondairy) it's to bad i can't get that on a photo. Photo are very misleading even the most expert meteorite hunter can tell from a photo. I don't mind because i know what i know. Here is a photo of a 2 kilo mars on sale and it has also a thick crust.

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#7 DHEB

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 04:32 AM

Hi everyone, i have come across a very very rare find indeed. I have found a 27 kilo shergottite with fusioncrust remnants. I can't believe it, i was dug up at a sand/gravel plant and ended up in someones garden where i spotted it. LUCKY Find.

This is not a meteorite. This is a weathered granite boulder. What you call "fusion crust" is the layer of chemically weathered granite, that is the depth to which chemical degradation of the rock has progressed and transformed some of the minerals into others.

 

See this: https://opentextbc.c...cal-weathering/


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#8 stonesnuffer

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 04:48 AM

This is not a meteorite. This is a weathered granite boulder. What you call "fusion crust" is the layer of chemically weathered granite, that is the depth to which chemical degradation of the rock has progressed and transformed some of the minerals into others.

 

See this: https://opentextbc.c...cal-weathering/

Yes i know what you mean but in this case it would be a diabase because of the lath shaped crystals.



#9 DHEB

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 05:44 AM

Yes i know what you mean but in this case it would be a diabase because of the lath shaped crystals.

I am a geologist although not an expert in petrology. In any case, from what I see in the pictures this is a granitic (plutonic) rock with typical weathering crust. To me this is a typical rock from the Earth and not a meteorite. @Glassthrower has pointed out it too. You claim the rock has "fusion crust". Perhaps you can show it?


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#10 lee14

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 05:56 AM

It's nice that you have an interest in meteorites. Unfortunately none of the rocks you have imaged in your several posts qualifies as such. Your sole justification seems to be 'I know what I know'. That is an example of a fundamental flaw in logic. It's not how science works. You have shown zero evidence of non-terrestrial origin. What you call a 'fusion crust' has neither the appearance, composition, nor thickness of such a feature. Your subjective assessment of 'features', or 'crystals', etc, is entirely devoid of any concrete evidence. Have you performed a chemical analysis? Microscopic studies? Isotope analysis? XRF readings? None of the images you have posted are meteorites. None.

 

Lee 


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#11 mark8888

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 07:53 AM

It's also worth pointing out that if the 27 kilo rock posted here were shergottite, it would be one of the most valuable meteorites ever found. I wouldn't know how to start estimating it, an important and unique space stone like this would sell at a top auction house for an absolutely ludicrous amount of money.  Here's a tiny little slice of Shergottite, 8g, that sold for $15,000.  That values your rock at around 50 million dollars.

 

https://onlineonly.c...et-mars-8/73280

 

So when you call it a "LUCKY Find", I don't think the word lucky really does it justice, even in caps.  The odds of finding a Mars rock like this, especially not in a well-established strewn field, would have to be something like one in several billion... i guess higher? Incalculable.


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#12 stonesnuffer

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 08:31 AM

It's nice that you have an interest in meteorites. Unfortunately none of the rocks you have imaged in your several posts qualifies as such. Your sole justification seems to be 'I know what I know'. That is an example of a fundamental flaw in logic. It's not how science works. You have shown zero evidence of non-terrestrial origin. What you call a 'fusion crust' has neither the appearance, composition, nor thickness of such a feature. Your subjective assessment of 'features', or 'crystals', etc, is entirely devoid of any concrete evidence. Have you performed a chemical analysis? Microscopic studies? Isotope analysis? XRF readings? None of the images you have posted are meteorites. None.

 

Lee 

i understand and yes all the other rocks where no meteorites. But this one is very different and has one patch of the outer crust witch clearly has melt and small remnant of black fusion crust. I just have to do some more reseach. Hope gives live.



#13 stonesnuffer

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 08:35 AM

It's also worth pointing out that if the 27 kilo rock posted here were shergottite, it would be one of the most valuable meteorites ever found. I wouldn't know how to start estimating it, an important and unique space stone like this would sell at a top auction house for an absolutely ludicrous amount of money.  Here's a tiny little slice of Shergottite, 8g, that sold for $15,000.  That values your rock at around 50 million dollars.

 

https://onlineonly.c...et-mars-8/73280

 

So when you call it a "LUCKY Find", I don't think the word lucky really does it justice, even in caps.  The odds of finding a Mars rock like this, especially not in a well-established strewn field, would have to be something like one in several billion... i guess higher? Incalculable.

Yes i understand and i do know it is an astronomical ridicioules chance of being a mars meteorite and if so would be priceless no number can be put on this rock qua money if it turns out to be mars. But it very well possible just like the anonymous finder of the biggest 13,5 kilo. lunar meteorite



#14 stonesnuffer

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 08:49 AM

this stone on this foto is now the biggest mars meteorite found and was showed of on a meteorite fair don't know where.

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#15 mark8888

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 09:31 AM

this stone on this foto is now the biggest mars meteorite found and was showed of on a meteorite fair don't know where.

 

Seems that it's Tucson.  Anyway, that isn't in any way related to your rock.


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#16 stonesnuffer

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Posted 06 May 2020 - 10:49 AM

oke back to my topic and my claims. I have cleaned the rock very well and found a spot with remnant fusion crust and clear visible white/brown lath crystals but as i said before can't take rasor sharp pictures so you probebly can't make it out on the photo's. And i have found meltglass inclusions or it could be maskelynite. I still have confidence in my rock.

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#17 mark8888

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Posted 06 May 2020 - 11:00 AM

I still have confidence in my rock.

 

That means you believe it's worth roughly $50,000,000.  It is secured?  What steps will you take to claim your $50,000,000?


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#18 stonesnuffer

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Posted 06 May 2020 - 12:27 PM

That means you believe it's worth roughly $50,000,000.  It is secured?  What steps will you take to claim your $50,000,000?

I am not in it for the money, i rather have the rock than the money. It has been i childs dream to find something like this. And to be realistic you can't put a vallue on this rock because it is unique. But if a silicon valley multi miljonair has intrest i might think about it.



#19 Kyphoron

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Posted 09 May 2020 - 09:42 PM

Yup, its a piece of weathered granite. Got them scattered all over the sides of our highways. Some are even blackened from when they blasted to make the road through rock faces.


Edited by Kyphoron, 09 May 2020 - 09:44 PM.

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#20 Jethro7

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Posted 09 May 2020 - 10:09 PM

I've been finding a collecting meteorites. That began as a child when I witnessed a fall in Moab Utah in the summer of 1967 and found the meteorite. Of course it does not make me a expert on such things.

The one sure way is to cut a slab out of it and have it tested. This will not ruin its value one bit and if it is indeed determined to be Sheregottite it would be quite valuable.

I have found many specimens that sure  looked like meteorites but turned out to be meteor wrongs. Some times they are very obviously Meteorites and others not so much. 

Just Google up Meteorite testing Labs.

But since so many meteorites are coming in from North West Africa many universities have quit testing suspect meteorites.

Good Luck who knows maybe you will be super lucky and it turns out to be from Mercury or Venus.               

"HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro


Edited by Jethro7, 09 May 2020 - 10:11 PM.


#21 stonesnuffer

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Posted 11 May 2020 - 04:02 PM

here the in situ photo of the rock in the owners garden from which i bought the rock. In the center of the rock you can see the secondaire fusion crust or the crust under the black fusion layer.

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#22 Kyphoron

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Posted 11 May 2020 - 07:53 PM

I have found a picture online that looks very similar to your rock. Its a piece of granite with what you call a fusion crust. Until you have it tested at a lab and post the results here, I am sticking with the fact of a piece of weathered granite.

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#23 stonesnuffer

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Posted 13 May 2020 - 03:30 PM

Well that doesn't look at all like the compostion of my rock. To make this discussion easyer i have decided to let the rock be cut and finally reveal the inside of the rock and put this mystery to bed. I wil be cutt friday.



#24 Kunama

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Posted 13 May 2020 - 05:53 PM

I like the OP's enthusiasm, however, I would encourage him to do a lot more research on the subject. 

 

Seems to me that he has a few nice examples of granite that has some of nice examples of exfoliation (onion peel weathering).   This type of weathering is usually first seen on the most curved part of the host sample. If you look at the samples you'll notice the areas affected.  It is a natural process caused by the heating and cooling of the sample, the surface heats more and thus expands more causing it to break away.


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#25 stonesnuffer

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Posted 14 May 2020 - 05:18 AM

well i have thought about it for a long time, but i will keep my stone intact and we will leave it at a granite boulder and i will leave this forum. Thanks foor all the input and wish you all happy hunting. Cheers




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