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The Ultimate CCD Camera

ccd dslr mount tripod observatory imaging lens making CMOS accessories
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#1 SonOfMatthew

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 06:16 PM

Hello Guys, a newbie in the building and it's definitely good to be here.

 

Would like an advice on CCD Camera's...all suggestions are welcomed, thanks,

So I am a filmmaker and an lover of cameras and great optics who is very interested in capturing some of the best imagery. I have always loved the images from CCD sensors as through my research they have been able to capture certain details that CMOS sensors haven't able to....that is not a knock on CMOS sensors as they are able to capture and perform technically better and easier power consumption than many CCD sensors (may be generalizing a little here). I really believe CCD sensors have created the most beautiful digital imagery created.

 

Sorry about my little epilogue but I need some of you knowledge and suggestions in putting together a great all in one Digital Video Camera with an amazingly beautiful CCD sensor (maybe a Kodak - TrueSense) that can allow me record and capture high quality video upwards 4K (around that region) at a stretch, also at 24 frames per second. and being able to utilize great cinematic lens like the Carl Zeiss.

 

Are there cameras readily available that match such description? Can I build one up? Are there companies the house is familiar with that can couple such cameras, are there in-house technicians I can work with to make this dream come true?

 

This is a passion project of mine and deeply important for my research so as to capture some of the most beautiful images in the world, using sensors that can see the dust around celestial  objects deep in space...and when I'm ready to embark on  my Astrophotography and Astrovideography properly, I will love to document some of my motion pictures with the camera.

 

Any and all advice/suggestions are welcomed, opened to all ideas.

 

Will be deeply appreciated, thanks guys. waytogo.gif



#2 rockstarbill

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 06:39 PM

CCD is pretty much game over in the long run. Sony and OnSemi are both done with providing CCD chips. Sony has released some very interesting CMOS chips, like the IMX455 that seem to be excellent for many purposes. Perhaps look in that direction for your goals.


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#3 WadeH237

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 07:08 PM

Welcome to Cloudy Nights!
 

Sorry about my little epilogue but I need some of you knowledge and suggestions in putting together a great all in one Digital Video Camera with an amazingly beautiful CCD sensor (maybe a Kodak - TrueSense) that can allow me record and capture high quality video upwards 4K (around that region) at a stretch, also at 24 frames per second. and being able to utilize great cinematic lens like the Carl Zeiss.

This is probably not what you want to hear, but it just doesn't work that way.  All of the gear that we use in this hobby is a compromise in some way or another.

 

Using this as an example, there are architectural issues that will likely prevent anyone from building the camera that you describe.  The issue is that the internals of CCD and CMOS cameras are quite different.  A CCD, for example, reads the data by using a single A/D converter and reading the pixels from the sensor in a stream.  A CMOS camera has electronics, including an A/D converter, for each pixel.  With a CMOS camera, it is possible to read any single pixel from the sensor or to read the entire array of pixels very quickly.  For that reason, you will probably only be able to simultaneously get both high resolution and high frame rates with a CMOS camera.

 

The most effective way to make a purchasing choice is to determine and prioritize your functional requirements without regard to technology.  Then look at the capabilities of the available products.  In most cases, you are not going to find a solution that exactly matches everything.  The exercise, then, is to determine what gives you the best compromise solution with regard to your requirements.

 

We love to compare, contrast and debate the various merits of the different technologies.  But at the end of the day, it's an academic discussion.  What matters are the workflow and final result.


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#4 SonOfMatthew

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 07:23 PM

Welcome to Cloudy Nights!
 

This is probably not what you want to hear, but it just doesn't work that way.  All of the gear that we use in this hobby is a compromise in some way or another.

 

Using this as an example, there are architectural issues that will likely prevent anyone from building the camera that you describe.  The issue is that the internals of CCD and CMOS cameras are quite different.  A CCD, for example, reads the data by using a single A/D converter and reading the pixels from the sensor in a stream.  A CMOS camera has electronics, including an A/D converter, for each pixel.  With a CMOS camera, it is possible to read any single pixel from the sensor or to read the entire array of pixels very quickly.  For that reason, you will probably only be able to simultaneously get both high resolution and high frame rates with a CMOS camera.

 

The most effective way to make a purchasing choice is to determine and prioritize your functional requirements without regard to technology.  Then look at the capabilities of the available products.  In most cases, you are not going to find a solution that exactly matches everything.  The exercise, then, is to determine what gives you the best compromise solution with regard to your requirements.

 

We love to compare, contrast and debate the various merits of the different technologies.  But at the end of the day, it's an academic discussion.  What matters are the workflow and final result.

Thanks so much for the warm welcome and detailed breakdowns, I will definitely take all these into consideration moving forward.

 

I really appreciate your knowledgeable inputs,




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