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Best eyepiece for galaxy

beginner eyepieces observing reflector dob
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#1 Carlos823863

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 03:53 PM

Hello, i wanted to know what eyepiece would be best for my Dobsonian it is a

Apertura DT10

Focal Ratio:

f/4.9

Aperture:

254mm/10in

Focal Length 

1250mm

Here is the link of where i bought my dob. 
https://www.highpoin...onian-telescope

please let me know of a good eyepiece for galaxies that is under $300


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#2 CharlieB

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:06 PM

Moving this to Eyepieces.



#3 Carlos823863

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:06 PM

Moving this to Eyepieces.

Ok



#4 havasman

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:14 PM

There are going to be many correct answers to your Q as variables including your observing conditions, which galaxies you're observing and what you like are all in play.

 

But a 13T6 Nagler bought on the secondary market should cost you @ $210-230 and work very well in many situations.


Edited by havasman, 20 May 2020 - 04:15 PM.

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#5 Astrojensen

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:20 PM

Galaxies come in all manner of sizes and brightnesses, so there's not one best eyepiece for galaxies. Except maybe a high-end zoom... And even that is questionable, as there are no 2" zooms with ~30mm focal length for those really large galaxies like M31, M33 and IC 342. 

 

But if you want one that can do most Messier and bright NGC galaxies well in a 10", then look at something that give close to 2mm exit pupil, as that is often close to the best for many galaxies. That's 125x in your telescope, so it's a magnification that almost always work well, not too high to be blurred by bad seeing most of the time. A 10mm eyepiece gives a 2mm exit pupil in your scope, but going a little lower or higher doesn't ruin it. 11mm to 9mm is good.

 

Personally, I have a 9mm ES100 that I use in a 12" f/5 dob (same exit pupil as in a 10" f/5, but higher magnification) and the views are amazing! They run around $200 new. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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#6 Carlos823863

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:25 PM

Galaxies come in all manner of sizes and brightnesses, so there's not one best eyepiece for galaxies. Except maybe a high-end zoom... And even that is questionable, as there are no 2" zooms with ~30mm focal length for those really large galaxies like M31, M33 and IC 342. 

 

But if you want one that can do most Messier and bright NGC galaxies well in a 10", then look at something that give close to 2mm exit pupil, as that is often close to the best for many galaxies. That's 125x in your telescope, so it's a magnification that almost always work well, not too high to be blurred by bad seeing most of the time. A 10mm eyepiece gives a 2mm exit pupil in your scope, but going a little lower or higher doesn't ruin it. 11mm to 9mm is good.

 

Personally, I have a 9mm ES100 that I use in a 12" f/5 dob (same exit pupil as in a 10" f/5, but higher magnification) and the views are amazing! They run around $200 new. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

With what degree because i only see ones that are 465$



#7 SeattleScott

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:30 PM

I would recommend 10-12mm. So now you have recommendations for 13, 12-10, and 11-9. Realistically anything between 13-9 should work pretty well.

Then it just depends do you want a $250 9mm or 13mm 100 AFOV, or maybe an 11mm 82 AFOV? Long eye relief? A $300 TV Nagler or a $100 Meade/Celestron?

Scott
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#8 SeattleScott

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:32 PM

With what degree because i only see ones that are 465$

I think he is remembering the pricing when these eyepieces first came out. But the APM HDC are about $250, lighter, and people generally say they are just as good, maybe even better than the ES hyperwides.

Scott
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#9 MellonLake

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:32 PM

The Nagler is really expensive if you want a lower price point, try the Meade 5000 8.8mm 82° eyepiece, it is a good eyepiece for a very reasonable price.  It is on sale right now for $99.00 at the CN sponsors website (see the top of this page).  The Explore Scientific 8.8 82° is also good at $169.  Either will give a 2mm exit pupil.  In your telescope this is also a good eyepiece for planets.   



#10 Carlos823863

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:33 PM

I would recommend 10-12mm. So now you have recommendations for 13, 12-10, and 11-9. Realistically anything between 13-9 should work pretty well.

Then it just depends do you want a $250 9mm or 13mm 100 AFOV, or maybe an 11mm 82 AFOV? Long eye relief? A $300 TV Nagler or a $100 Meade/Celestron?

Scott

The $250 sounds good but where can i buy it. Sadly i live in america and i see most sold on european websites



#11 RLK1

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:34 PM

I'd go with either a 9mm ES 100 or a 10mm Ethos. Both are good choices but, having both, I'd give the nod to the Ethos.



#12 SeattleScott

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:36 PM

The $250 sounds good but where can i buy it. Sadly i live in america and i see most sold on european websites

Lunt is the US retailer. There is another US vendor with cheaper shipping, maybe eyepieces.etc or Agena, can’t remember now.

Keep in mind that coma corrector arguably made hyperwide eyepieces in fast Dobs possible. So if you don’t have a CC then look more at 65-82 AFOV. Or plan on getting a CC.

#13 SeattleScott

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:37 PM

I'd go with either a 9mm ES 100 or a 10mm Ethos. Both are good choices but, having both, I'd give the nod to the Ethos.

Except he has a max budget of $300.

#14 Carlos823863

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:41 PM

I think ima go with the meade 8.8mm 82 degree. Is it good?



#15 SeattleScott

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:53 PM

I think ima go with the meade 8.8mm 82 degree. Is it good?

Yes it is quite good. I actually sold a 9mm original Nagler to buy the Meade 8.8.

Scott

#16 MellonLake

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:53 PM

I like my Meade 8.8mm 82°.  Are there better eyepieces, yes but for me this was a good eyepiece at the right price.  I find it gives very pleasing views with good contrast.   I used it his weekend to view the galaxies in Virgo at a Bortle 2 site.  Between scanning for the galaxies with my 24mm 68° Explore Scientific and magnifying them with the Meade 8.8mm I easily identified and spent time viewing about 30 galaxies without really trying to hard to look for the really dim ones.  Over the course of the night I probably looked at 40+ galaxies.       

 

I also really like looking at galaxy groups with the ES 24mm 68° (Markarian's Chain, M81/M82, Leo Triplett,  M106 group).

 

All the best

 

Rob  


Edited by MellonLake, 20 May 2020 - 04:54 PM.


#17 Carlos823863

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 05:01 PM

How do galaxies look like from eyepieces i try to search up how they look but i only see pictures from dslr cameras 



#18 stevenrjanssens

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 05:05 PM

How do galaxies look like from eyepieces i try to search up how they look but i only see pictures from dslr cameras 

Check out the sketching forum for a better representation of what things look like visually. I bookmarked this one site of a Cloudy Night's member:
 

http://thestarsketcher.blogspot.com/


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#19 MellonLake

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 05:07 PM

Also check out this site: https://www.stelvisi...cope-simulator/  and use the advanced function.   I have found this site representative of the view through the eyepiece.  You can simulate the eyepieces as well. 

 

Rob  



#20 MellonLake

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 05:09 PM

Again...the sketches and the simulator are representative of relatively dark sky site views.



#21 Sketcher

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 05:57 PM

How do galaxies look like from eyepieces i try to search up how they look but i only see pictures from dslr cameras 

How dark is your sky in the absence of the moon? (Look up "Bortle Scale," read the descriptions, and tell us which Bortle Number comes closest to describing your sky darkness.  Sky darkness can have a HUGE impact on what galaxies will look like.

 

Are any artificial lights visible from where you'll be observing from -- streetlights, porch lights, security lights, etc?  If so, how close are they and how many can be seen from your observing location?  Can they be blocked from your view?

 

Answer these questions; and f your sky darkness situation is similar to mine, I'll be able to give you an idea of what galaxies might look like for you.  If your sky is much different from mine, others here (who have experience under skies similar to yours) will be better able to describe what galaxies will look like for you.


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#22 sanbai

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 06:09 PM

The eyepiece choice will depend (at least) on which galaxies, how you like the surroundings, and the quality of your sky (seeing and darkness).

You may want a large true field (combination of focal length and aparent field) to see some big galaxies like Andromeda, M33, M31. Also to see groups of them like M81/82, Markarian's chain...

If you observe from urban polluted skies, you may prefer high magnifications (even 1 mm exit pupil of less!) To increase contrast (up to a balance).

Large, frontal galaxies may call for low large exit pupils (low magnification, independently of the true field). This is if the pollution allows. I can't see M101 or M33 from my backyard.

I guess galaxies aren't or won't be your only interest. Plan a good set of eyepieces rather than one for galaxies. A good set will cover all your needs and do >95% of what a "dedicated" eyepiece could do for its specific target. Dedicated eyepieces are more usual for planets, but some have favorites for faint DSOs.

Once you have a set, experiment to see which one is the best for the any specific target. It won't be necessarily always the same. One day you may focus on the galaxy and nothing else, and another you may want the full panorama around.

Edited by sanbai, 20 May 2020 - 06:12 PM.

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#23 Carlos823863

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 06:10 PM

How dark is your sky in the absence of the moon? (Look up "Bortle Scale," read the descriptions, and tell us which Bortle Number comes closest to describing your sky darkness.  Sky darkness can have a HUGE impact on what galaxies will look like.

 

Are any artificial lights visible from where you'll be observing from -- streetlights, porch lights, security lights, etc?  If so, how close are they and how many can be seen from your observing location?  Can they be blocked from your view?

 

Answer these questions; and f your sky darkness situation is similar to mine, I'll be able to give you an idea of what galaxies might look like for you.  If your sky is much different from mine, others here (who have experience under skies similar to yours) will be better able to describe what galaxies will look like for you.

I use my telescope at my sisters ranch always clear there is light behind us but its dim so its mostly dark



#24 dusty99

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 06:11 PM

It's good.  Before you posted about the 8.8 I was going to suggest the 9mm Baader Morpheus or 10mm Televue Delos, both of which are better than the Mease UWA 8.8mm, b ut also 3x as much $ (+ or -).

 

 

I think ima go with the meade 8.8mm 82 degree. Is it good?


Edited by dusty99, 20 May 2020 - 06:14 PM.


#25 Astrojensen

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Posted 21 May 2020 - 02:46 AM

With what degree because i only see ones that are 465$

My bad! I thought I had seen them for $199 lately, but that must have been years ago...! 

 

The APM/Lunt 100 degrees are within your budget, though, and are also most excellent eyepieces. 

 

Here's a link to the 9mm: https://www.eyepiece..._p/17101090.htm

 

There's also a 13mm, which is perhaps even better for you, since you observe under fairly dark skies. It'll give 96x and a 1° field, almost ideal for a lot of the Messier galaxies. 

 

https://www.eyepiece..._p/17101125.htm

 

 

A coma corrector has been mentioned and while they're very nice to have, you don't strictly need one at f/5, especially not at these medium magnifications. Save that for later, once you get really hooked and lust for that 20mm 100° eyepiece for those extra wide fields! Then a coma corrector will come into its own.

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark


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