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Two way offbeat PNs: Kronberger 63 and Abell 19

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#1 astrovienna

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 08:22 AM

Kn63 was discovered around 2010 by Matthias Kronberger of the Deep Sky Hunters group. It's acquired the nickname “Medallion Nebula,” apparently because of its location near the neck of Orion. The progenitor star appears to be the very faint blue star at center.  It’s about 6 arc minutes in diameter, and is so faint that it barely registers even in long exposure CCD images. OIII is much stronger than Ha (which isn’t saying much!).  I found only two images of this PN other than the verification image taken with the Kitt Peak 2.1m reflector - a very nice one by Peter Goodhew on Abin and a very deep one from CHART32 with the 32-inch reflector in Chile.

 

https://pbase.com/sk...image/170728796

 

This image uses OIII for luminance for the PN and maps Ha:OIII:OIII to R:G:B for color. The stars are separate RGB data.  Full details on capture and processing are at the link.

 

Kevin

Attached Thumbnails

  • Kn63.jpg

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#2 astrovienna

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 08:22 AM

If you're wondering how faint "faint" really is, here's a single 20-minute OIII image - one of the best! I can't even imagine what magnitude this PN is.

https://pbase.com/image/170731062

Attached Thumbnails

  • Raw Frame Stretched OIII_frame29_reduced.jpg

Edited by astrovienna, 23 May 2020 - 08:24 AM.

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#3 astrovienna

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 08:27 AM

In contrast to the newly-found Kn63, Abell 19 must have been discovered back in the 1950s to have made it onto George Abell’s list.  There should be some images of it because it’s discussed every now and then in the literature regarding its interaction with nearby ISM.  But I’ve found nothing at all, so this might be the first detailed image of it.  It’s certainly not a showpiece object – magnitude 17, only about 1 arcminute, and lacking much structure – so that probably explains why there are no amateur images of it.  The star at the center of the nebula might not be the progenitor star, since PN central stars are usually blue and this one is rather yellow. This image uses Ha for luminance for the PN and the background nebulosity, and maps Ha:OIII:OIII to R:G:B for color. The stars are separate RGB data.

 

https://pbase.com/sk...image/170703415

 

And inverted Ha and OIII images:

 

https://pbase.com/sk...image/170703420

 

Full details on capture and processing are at the link.

 

Kevin

Attached Thumbnails

  • Abell 19 v2 reduced.jpg

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#4 AarondeVries

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 08:34 AM

Thanks for Kn63 Kevin

 

An interesting and intriguing object and a fine desciption of you post processing as well (those are scary thin subs). 



#5 Astroman007

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 08:42 AM

Kn63 was discovered around 2010 by Matthias Kronberger of the Deep Sky Hunters group. It's acquired the nickname “Medallion Nebula,” apparently because of its location near the neck of Orion. The progenitor star appears to be the very faint blue star at center.  It’s about 6 arc minutes in diameter, and is so faint that it barely registers even in long exposure CCD images. OIII is much stronger than Ha (which isn’t saying much!).  I found only two images of this PN other than the verification image taken with the Kitt Peak 2.1m reflector - a very nice one by Peter Goodhew on Abin and a very deep one from CHART32 with the 32-inch reflector in Chile.

 

https://pbase.com/sk...image/170728796

 

This image uses OIII for luminance for the PN and maps Ha:OIII:OIII to R:G:B for color. The stars are separate RGB data.  Full details on capture and processing are at the link.

 

Kevin

Amazing! Very pretty image too. Thank you for sharing both image and backstory; it is much appreciated here. waytogo.gif



#6 MikeTahtib

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 09:08 AM

As a non-astrophotographer, I found the single frame fascinating, to see what you guys work with. 



#7 schmeah

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 09:09 AM

Two great images of targets that we would never see otherwise. So well done, even more remarkably so from your skies. Thanks for sharing!

 

Derek



#8 Ptarmigan

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 09:49 PM

Nice images of obscure objects! cool.gif waytogo.gif

 

I like seeing obscure objects imaged. cool.gif



#9 leemr

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Posted 23 May 2020 - 11:59 PM

Awesome work, Kevin, thanks for sharing!



#10 Mert

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Posted 24 May 2020 - 05:22 AM

That's impressive, the first time I see this object and it must be extremely

dimm to see your single sub.

Well done!!



#11 H-Alfa

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Posted 24 May 2020 - 05:32 AM

Very interesting target. Thanks for sharing!

Enviado desde mi VOG-L29 mediante Tapatalk

#12 astroian

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Posted 24 May 2020 - 05:40 AM

Great pair of images. Nice to see something other than the usual.

Cheers,
Ian

#13 astrovienna

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Posted 24 May 2020 - 07:23 AM

Thanks for all the nice comments, everyone.  It's a good thing that most deep sky objects aren't this faint.  We never would have discovered them at all!

 

Kevin



#14 Christian-UAE

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Posted 24 May 2020 - 08:52 AM

Very interesting read and images. Thanks for sharing.

Regards
Christian

#15 RTJoe

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Posted 24 May 2020 - 11:02 AM

Very impressive! And many thanks for the very detailed description of your processing workflow!

 

Joachim



#16 astrovienna

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Posted 25 May 2020 - 10:36 AM

Thanks Christian and Joachim.  The folks in my local club suggested that Kn63 be called the Jolly Face or the Pillsbury Doughboy.  :)

 

Kevin




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