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first eyepieces?

accessories cassegrain Celestron eyepieces
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#1 dalr753

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 03:34 PM

hey guy i just got my first telescope a celestron 6se and was wondering what eyepieces i should get first.

would the celestron 1.25" set with filters be good or are they junk? any good ones i should get first/avoid?



#2 ShaulaB

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 03:41 PM

Avoid the set. You will not use the filters much, you may not like using a Barlow, and the eyepieces are on the lower middle of choices.


Use the eyepieces that came with the scope. See what you think of them.
A suggestion with your scope is to use a zoom eyepiece, 8 to 24mm focal lengths. Some can be had for just under $100.

As you will see, the cost has a wide range. A Televue Plossl from 32 to 20mm might suit you. If you need to wear glasses due to astigmatism, note the eye relief for an e.p. and keep that above 10mm.

Best of luck!
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#3 dalr753

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 03:48 PM

yeah i do wear glasses(thick ones too) and unfortunatly it only came with on 25mm.


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#4 Jim Davis

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 03:56 PM

Asking about eyepieces is a dangerous subject. You will get lots of answers.

 

I tend to stay away from kits, they include things you may end up not using. Nothing particularly wrong with the eyepieces, but you can find better. You don't need a lot to start. Three is normally good.

 

Some good eyepieces:

 

Astrotech Paradigm Dual HD are $60, with a discount for Cloudynights users since they run this web site: https://www.astronom...iece_series=478

 

Agena Astro SWAs are $45 and up, a bit wider field of view, not quite as good on planets as the Dual HD, some are 2" so you would have to buy a 2" diagonal: https://agenaastro.c...-agena_swa.html

 

BST Planetary are similar to the Dual HD for $55, more designed for viewing planets, so they have a lot of shorter focal lengths: https://agenaastro.c...ary.html?cat=10

 

Or just look around an Agenaastro.com, many eyepiece lines available.


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#5 ratnamaravind

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 04:02 PM

Don't buy junk. Buy good stuff once.

 

The 6se is an f/10 which isn't very demanding, so pretty much any design with updated coatings will work well. But don't get kit eyepieces.

 

The Agena Dual ED/Astrotech Paradigm series (same eyepieces) are the biggest bang for buck and have higher light throughput than the inexpensive wide angles. Get the 8, 15, 25. You are all done for $180.

 

For a slightly higher budget and for an even more convenient setup, get a Baader Zoom (~$225 used) and add a decent 32mm plossl ($40?). 

 

If you want the best, get a series of Televue Plossls accommodating the eye relief issue under 15mm noted above. The popular workaround is a 2x barlow. So get the 32, 25, 20, 15 and a 2x barlow. About $500 new or $300 used on CN/Astromart if you are patient.


Edited by ratnamaravind, 27 May 2020 - 04:06 PM.


#6 asterope62

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 04:10 PM

If your budget allows,  and because you wear glasses, I would recommend Tele Vue's DeLite series,  they offer 20mm eye relief. I own three of them and they are great! I'm personally,  due to getting older, trying to replace all of my eyepieces with ones that offer high eye relief. 



#7 dusty99

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 04:14 PM

A good basic set for the C6 is a 32mm Plossl (like the GSO) and then slightly wider field EPs in the 18 and 12mm ranges (the Paradigms already mentioned, Meade HD-60s or Celestron XCel LXs) plus a decent Barlow (the GSO 2.5x is good).  That will give you a good range and be better than the starter kit.



#8 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 04:20 PM

I also recommend the 60-degree Astro-Tech Paradigm Dual EDs that Jim mentioned. 

If you'd like a larger apparent field of view, the 70-degree Bresser eyepieces will work just fine in a slow f/10 SCT.  The 10mm and 15mm Bressers are still available.

 

https://explorescien...e/brand_bresser  - 10mm 

 

https://agenaastro.c..._70.html?cat=10 - 10 and 15mm

 

The 8.8mm Meade UWA has an even larger AFOV of 82 degrees and is currently on sale.  It would serve as a good medium high power eyepiece.

https://www.astronom...waterproof.html

 

You'll get a small discount if you purchase from Astronomics, the sponsor of Cloudy Nights.

 

https://www.cloudyni...y_discount.html



#9 aeajr

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 05:29 PM

If you have glasses and you need to wear them while observing, you will want eyepieces that have at least 20 mm of eye relief.  This is a spec provided by the eyepiece manufacturer.   

 

Many eyepieces can provide this in focal lengths of 20 mm or longer.  However many have designs that provide shorter and shorter eye relief as the focal lengths get shorter.

 

I would look for eyepieces of 8 mm and longer to start.  

 

I am a HUGE fan of zoom eyepieces, but I don't know if they will have enough eye relief for you.


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#10 mr_snout

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 05:53 PM

A Celestron Zoom is a good place to start. See how often u use the scope to see if y want to invest more in the hobby. Televue is a popular high end EP. They are very good, but there are other brands that are a bit less expensive and offer an upgrade to standard EPs. I am a fan of Baader and Explore Scientific. I got carried away with EPs- I have nine, but you probably only need 3-4.

#11 Dennis Tap

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 06:11 PM

I use my Baader Mark IV Zoom on my 5'' and 8''. The Meade 8-24 zoom on my 70mm/400 just feels right. Although it has a smaller FOV, it's weight is ok.



#12 vtornado

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 10:39 PM

Hello and welcome to the forum.

 

One of my most used eyepiece is a 32mm plossl.  In your scope it will give the maximum true field of view in a 1.25 inch eyepiece.

The filters in planetary filter sets are normally very dark, and hold back too much light.  For planets you need lots of light to see details.

Most of the effective filters I have used are the very light tinted ones.

 

Eyepiece kits normally contain eyepieces that are not practical (for example a 4mm plossl, which has no eye relief) or redunant eyepieces

with the included barlow  (like a 32mm eyepiece, 2x barlow and 15mm plossl). 

 

I agree whish Shaula, before buying a lot of eyepieces, use what you have, and note any diffencies.  Buy your first eyepieces here

on the classified.  You will probably buy ones that you don't like (it happens to us all).  Then you can resell them without

losing a lot of money in the deal.

 

For an f/10 scope like yours I would buy eyepieces in the range of 8 - 32.   If you are considering a barlow be careful to space

the focal lengths so you don't get many duplicate magnifications.


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#13 aeajr

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Posted 28 May 2020 - 02:53 PM

This article will tell you everything you need to know.

 

Understanding Telescope Eyepieces- There are recommendations, based on budget,
but the meat of the article is about understanding the considerations and specifications
to know when selecting eyepieces.
https://telescopicwa...cope-eyepieces/


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#14 Supernova74

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Posted 28 May 2020 - 03:29 PM

well your scope is only as good as the eyepieces you use back in the day thay used to be hygens and there are now more modified 2 element equivalents then you had the Kellner,orthscopic,now the more modern standard eyepieces are plossel 

thease are useally the bog standard eyepiece that is supplied in some telescope packages thay are not bad but the feild of view is limited to around 52 degrees.

 

there are a large range of eyepieces available to the Amateur Astronomer and in this day and age don,t have to pay a bomb for skywatcher do some great eyepieces for the money wide feild also but on your sct don,t go overboard With as the sct cassagrain has a central obstruction.

 

the Exsplore scientific range are brilliant eyepieces 

62 degree series start from around $95 

68 degree series around $150 upwards  (note tho the longer focal lengths are more expensive as have more glass)



#15 dalr753

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Posted 28 May 2020 - 05:47 PM

i was looking at some of your recommendations and 2 i liked are are the baader zoom and the televue plossl.

between the zoom and maybe to start an 8mm and 32mm televue what do you guys think? which would be more clear or useful?



#16 aeajr

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Posted 28 May 2020 - 07:14 PM

A zoom is more versatile as you can go through a very wide mag range and never have to change an eyepiece.

 

I don't have and Tele Vue eyepieces but their reputation is excellent. 

 

I consider the Baader Hyperion Zoom as sharp and clear as my Explore Scientific 82s and my Meade Ultra wides, just not as wide of a field of view.


Edited by aeajr, 29 May 2020 - 12:43 PM.

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#17 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 29 May 2020 - 12:26 AM

i was looking at some of your recommendations and 2 i liked are are the baader zoom and the televue plossl.

between the zoom and maybe to start an 8mm and 32mm televue what do you guys think? which would be more clear or useful?

You may find that a 24mm wide-field eyepiece like the 24mm Explore Scientific 68-degree is more pleasing than a 32mm Plössl.  They both produce essentially the same true field of view  but the 24mm will have a larger apparent field, produce a darker background field, and show fainter stars.


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#18 Echolight

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Posted 29 May 2020 - 09:11 AM

I bought an 8-24 zoom for my first eyepiece. Then I could just add a low powered wide angle for a minimalist set. And because I figured it would be useful on any scope I might want now or in the future.

And I figured eventually I'd sometimes want to have two scopes set up at side by side. And one could use the zoom, and I could swap eyepieces on the other. 

 

Not the best at anything. But surely useful and very versatile. I think especially on the long focal length SCT's which are mostly set up with 1.25 inch diagonals. Add a 2x barlow and I can get to 500x on my SCT and 300x on the 150 f/8 achro.

 

I also have a 1.25 inch 40mm for the SCT. And will soon add a similar 2 inch for the refractor.

 

I'll probably also add a 20mm 2 inch for the refractor. But not sure if I want to invest in a 2 inch setup for the C8.


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#19 aeajr

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Posted 29 May 2020 - 12:41 PM

You may find that a 24mm wide-field eyepiece like the 24mm Explore Scientific 68-degree is more pleasing than a 32mm Plössl.  They both produce essentially the same true field of view  but the 24mm will have a larger apparent field, produce a darker background field, and show fainter stars.

I would agree.   

 

Of course the 32 mm Plossl will be about $45 new and the ES 68 will be about $160 new.  But if the cost is not a concern, I would agree the ES 68 24 is a better choice.

 

Eye relief on the 32 mm Plossl is about 22 mm eye relief which should be plenty for your glasses.

 

Eye relief on the 24 mm ES 68 is about 18 mm which will be enough for most eyeglass wearers.  Can't say if it is enough for you. 

 

Something for you to consider. 


Edited by aeajr, 29 May 2020 - 12:48 PM.


#20 LDW47

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 07:57 AM

I would agree.   

 

Of course the 32 mm Plossl will be about $45 new and the ES 68 will be about $160 new.  But if the cost is not a concern, I would agree the ES 68 24 is a better choice.

 

Eye relief on the 32 mm Plossl is about 22 mm eye relief which should be plenty for your glasses.

 

Eye relief on the 24 mm ES 68 is about 18 mm which will be enough for most eyeglass wearers.  Can't say if it is enough for you. 

 

Something for you to consider. 

Basically you pay $120 more for a little darker background and at low power fainter stars, does that matter to most observers, some like a liter background ! Comfortable eye relief is another story ! And boy it sure leaves a lot of $ for more goodies, lol !  Clear comfortable skize !  PS:  Unless of course you are a perfectionist, prestigenist if you will, with an oversized wallet, lol !


Edited by LDW47, 30 May 2020 - 07:59 AM.


#21 dalr753

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 12:19 PM

thank you guys for all the info!


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#22 rajilina

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Posted 01 June 2020 - 09:31 AM

A zoom is more versatile as you can go through a very wide mag range and never have to change an eyepiece.

 

I don't have and Tele Vue eyepieces but their reputation is excellent. 

 

I consider the Baader Hyperion Zoom as sharp and clear as my Explore Scientific 82s and my Meade Ultra wides, just not as wide of a field of view.

I'm giving a +1 to this. 

 

I have the Baader Hyperion Mark IV zoom and it's my most-used eyepiece. Some people don't like zooms, but I do. I got the set with the included matching Barlow, which makes it ideal for grab-and-go because you don't have to tote around a case full of eyepieces to get a full range of magnification. It's got great, sharp, clear optics, and a really smooth nice click-stop operation so you know when you're on a specific magnification. Baader in my opinion is an underrated brand... for the price, they are *really* good.

 

My other most-used eyepieces are Tele Vue Plossls, and while relatively expensive, are top-notch quality. I intend to get a full set of these eventually.




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