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He would get so rich so quick

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#1 grif 678

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Posted 29 May 2020 - 07:32 PM

Maybe should be in Off Topic?, but since it involves an eyepiece, I will start here.

If someone could invent an eyepiece that can neutralize the clouds, and see through them he would become a millionaire over night. But I guess that would have to involve the objective lens if a refractor, and the mirrors if a reflector.



#2 DLuders

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Posted 29 May 2020 - 07:36 PM

It could be a "she" instead of a "he".   wink.gif  
 


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#3 Shorty Barlow

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Posted 29 May 2020 - 07:57 PM

Or ... https://www.firstlig...-cloud-gun.html


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#4 BillP

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Posted 29 May 2020 - 08:59 PM

If someone could invent an eyepiece that can neutralize the clouds, and see through them he would become a millionaire over night.

Already invented.  Called the "book".  Lets you peer not only through clouds, but also through time, space, and even reality!  It has no limits.  And yes, some inventors (i.e., authors) have indeed become millionaires.


Edited by BillP, 29 May 2020 - 09:00 PM.

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#5 25585

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 12:20 AM

Already invented.  Called the "book".  Lets you peer not only through clouds, but also through time, space, and even reality!  It has no limits.  And yes, some inventors (i.e., authors) have indeed become millionaires.

My inspiration for getting into the hobby was the late great Carl Sagan's "Cosmos" book & TV series.  


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#6 SeattleScott

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 12:21 AM

Already invented. Called the "book". Lets you peer not only through clouds, but also through time, space, and even reality! It has no limits. And yes, some inventors (i.e., authors) have indeed become millionaires.

Spoken like an author

#7 Starman1

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 01:27 PM

Maybe should be in Off Topic?, but since it involves an eyepiece, I will start here.

If someone could invent an eyepiece that can neutralize the clouds, and see through them he would become a millionaire over night. But I guess that would have to involve the objective lens if a refractor, and the mirrors if a reflector.

It has been invented--it's called a radio telescope.


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#8 MartinPond

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 02:16 PM

Well....I think the poster intends an optical view..

   a radio telescope would have pretty low resolution

   in the Solar System, and a massive size for resolution

   across the light-years.

 

Far Red and Near Infrared are used to penetrate a middling

    amount of clouds.  That leaves a basically black+white view,

    but you can use an image receptor and can do it all at the

    eyepiece location (focal plane of scope).  Satellites, stars, etc..

    in daytime.  (not thick clouds of course)

             

 

I did see a mysterious penetration of the fog and the 

    halos/blurring  around bright objects from sky moisture,

    with some quality, coated Ramsdens I made.

   I finally got down to the sea to make the distant seals appear

   again (when a Plossl or Paradign lost them).

 

 

I blew up the image 4x with a monocular....and found the 'secret':

  The best Ramsden was basically tweeked for a small but nearly-uniform

   chromatic edging across the field.  Since the CA from droplets all adds up to

   white, edge-details with a little violet and red are snatched up by the

   eye/cortex, and bam!  The birds and seals and boats pop out.

   The mind seems to fudge out the chromatics, do some edge-detection,

    so you don't notice the tiny CA consciously.   

    So just like some added noise can help with radar/radio,

     the edge-CA lets you see the edge, of  Jupiter or a distant yacht.

 

Who knew....CA can be your friend against the clouds/fog.


Edited by MartinPond, 31 May 2020 - 06:52 AM.


#9 Shorty Barlow

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Posted 30 May 2020 - 02:16 PM

https://www.jodrellb...-heritage-site/



#10 MartinPond

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Posted 31 May 2020 - 06:53 AM

Just try toting that down the road ;-)



#11 bobhen

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Posted 31 May 2020 - 08:08 AM

In the amateur world…

 

A camera can shoot high contrast objects like globular clusters through thin clouds.

 

And a NV Image Intensifier can also deliver real time views of the brighter deep sky objects through thin misty clouds. Obviously if the clouds are too thick there is no chance. And the views will, of course, not be a good as with a clear sky.

 

One night I was shooting video and was wondering why M-15 wasn’t coming up on the screen as usual. After I checked the scope and camera, I looked up. The sky was covered with a thin cloud cover so that only bright Jupiter and a few bright stars shone through. But M-15 was still showing up on the screen.

 

Bob


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#12 elwaine

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Posted 31 May 2020 - 01:25 PM

You can already by one. It comes in 2 sizes: 60mm (for only $8.73) and 80mm ($19.15).

https://www.aliexpre...2932747458.html

Can't wait to try them. 


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#13 RichA

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Posted 31 May 2020 - 02:45 PM

It could be a "she" instead of a "he".   wink.gif  
 

How about "it?"


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#14 faackanders2

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Posted 07 June 2020 - 11:23 PM

I call it the Hubble, or a book of hubble images.  Better that your best image or view from telescope.  And you can look in daytime.  But may not be as much fun as the challenge of finding and looking at an object in your telescope.



#15 MartinPond

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 09:15 AM

I call it the Hubble, or a book of hubble images.  Better that your best image or view from telescope.  And you can look in daytime.  But may not be as much fun as the challenge of finding and looking at an object in your telescope.

Or a NASA database of super-res images.

There is a challenge: where to go in the trans-infinite void!

Picking a random small piece of sky could allow you to find

   things nobody has had the time to find, though.  It happens.



#16 Monoeil

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 09:58 AM

It would be boring. Clouds are part of the game.




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